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Death, Sex & Money is a podcast about the big questions and hard choices that are often left out of polite conversation. Host Anna Sale talks to celebrities you've heard of—and to regular people you haven't—about the Big Stuff: relationships, money, family, work and making it all count while we're here. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, The Experiment, The New Yorker Radio Hour and many others.
 
Politics Brief is the go-to source for 2018 election news, selected from the best WNYC has to offer. Daily segments include original reporting on the New York metro region, along with interviews and analysis focused on the national scene from groundbreaking shows like On the Media, The Takeaway and The New Yorker Radio Hour. Produced by WNYC Studios, home of other great podcasts including Radiolab, Snap Judgment, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin. Category: News & Politics
 
What the hell is Super Tuesday and where does it come from? Why does Iowa vote first? What’s a caucus? Who gets to be a delegate? How to Vote in America is a weekly micro podcast that tries to make sense of our crazy democracy and what seems like a never-ending 2020 election process. In this podcast, we take small bites at big issues to help you understand something most people should, but probably don’t: voting. Hosted by The Takeaway’s Politics Host Amy Walter. WNYC Studios is a listener-s ...
 
It’s been 50 years since the uprising at the Stonewall Inn—an event that is widely considered to be the catalyst for the LGBTQ civil rights movement. To commemorate this moment, we’re bringing you an all new podcast series that celebrates queer stories and voices. Join Kathy Tu and Tobin Low, hosts of the Nancy podcast, for a special series of episodes that explore how this moment in history—and the setback and achievements that followed—have shaped the LGBTQ experience today. For more on ou ...
 
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As a kid, Jonathan was good at soccer and making friends. But by the age of eighteen, he was a drug dealer facing his first serious conviction. For his third conviction, although the charges were for nonviolent offenses, he received a twenty-one-year prison sentence. In 2019, after serving seventeen years, he was released under the First Step Act, …
 
The Supreme Court last week heard oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, a case that could lead to the closure of Mississippi’s last remaining abortion clinic. A law in the state bans most abortions after the fifteenth week of pregnancy—well before the time of fetal viability, which is the Supreme Court’s standard. The case…
 
Colin Barrett reads her story “A Shooting in Rathreedane,” from the December 13, 2021, issue of the magazine. Barrett is the author of the story collection “Young Skins,” which won the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award and the Guardian First Book Award in 2014. A new collection, “Homesickness,” will be published in May.…
 
The United States has the largest prison population in the world. But, until the publication of Michelle Alexander’s book “The New Jim Crow,” in 2010, most people didn’t use the term “mass incarceration,” or consider the practice a social-justice issue. Alexander argued that the increasing imprisonment of Black and brown men—through rising arrest r…
 
Last weekend, just as many Americans were returning from Thanksgiving feasts with family and friends, reports of a new coronavirus variant, called Omicron, began to proliferate worldwide. Though there is some preliminary evidence that Omicron may be more transmissible and less responsive to the current COVID-19 vaccines than previous variants, the …
 
The Scottish actor and I talk about body image, celebrating aging, why he isn't in a monogamous marriage, and the joys of taking ecstasy. If you or a loved one needs support around an eating disorder, you can call or text the National Eating Disorders Association's helpline at (800) 931-2237. If you're not already subscribed to our newsletter, sign…
 
Aimee Mann, the celebrated Los Angeles singer and songwriter, recently released an album called “Queens of the Summer Hotel.” The album was inspired in part by Susanna Kaysen’s best-selling memoir “Girl, Interrupted,” about Kaysen’s time in a psychiatric hospital. Mann sat down with Atul Gawande at The New Yorker Festival to talk about the new albu…
 
Growing up, Rachel Held Evans was a fiercely enthusiastic evangelizer for her faith, the kind of kid who relished the chance to sit next to an atheist. But when she experienced doubt, that sense of certainty began to crumble. “We went to all these conferences about how to defend your faith, how to have an answer for what you believe,” her sister Am…
 
At The New Yorker Festival, Dave Grohl talked with Kelefa Sanneh about Grohl’s new book, “The Storyteller: Tales of Life and Music.” Grohl, who was the drummer for Nirvana and then the frontman of the Foo Fighters, recalls his earliest experiences of taking music seriously—harmonizing with his mom to Carly Simon on the car radio. Grohl also talks a…
 
On the air, Yesi Ortiz is a warm, flirty host for a popular L.A. hip hop station. Off the air, she's a single parent of six adopted kids. Managing both roles is more than a challenge. If you're not already subscribed to our newsletter, sign up! Every Wednesday, we send out podcast listening recommendations, your stories from our inbox, and behind-t…
 
Mexico is a deeply Catholic nation where abortion was, for a long time, criminalized in many states; just a few years ago Coahuilla, near the U.S. border, imposed jail time on women who had the procedure. This year, Stephania Taladrid reported, Mexico’s ten-member Supreme Court voted unanimously to deciminalize abortion throughout the country—to th…
 
Greg Jackson reads his story “The Hollow,” from the November 29, 2021, issue of the magazine. Jackson, a winner of the National Book Foundation’s 5 Under 35 award, is the author of the story collection “Prodigals,” which came out in 2016. His first novel, “The Dimensions of a Cave,” will be published in 2023.…
 
Mexico is a deeply Catholic nation where abortion was, for a long time, criminalized in many states; just a few years ago, Coahuila, near the U.S. border, imposed jail time on women who underwent the procedure. But, this year, as Stephania Taladrid reported, Mexico’s ten-member Supreme Court voted unanimously to decriminalize abortion throughout th…
 
The Supreme Court, with a six-to-three majority of conservative justices, is hearing critical cases on abortion rights. If it approves restrictive state laws, large swaths of the country might quickly ban abortion. Jia Tolentino co-hosts a special episode on the future of abortion rights for Americans, which includes a discussion of the legal issue…
 
This month, Britney Spears was released from the conservatorship that had overseen her finances, communications, and professional and personal life for more than thirteen years. The details of the arrangement were shrouded in mystery and poorly covered by the media. But over the past two years, things started to change, as the #FreeBritney movement…
 
After storms and other climate disasters, legions of workers appear overnight to cover blown-out buildings with construction tarps, rip out ruined walls and floors, and start putting cities back together. They are largely migrants, predominantly undocumented, and lack basic protections for construction work. Their efforts are critical in an era of …
 
After storms and other climate disasters, legions of workers appear overnight to cover blown-out buildings with construction tarps, rip out ruined walls and floors, and start putting cities back together. They are largely migrants, predominantly undocumented, and lack basic protections for construction work. Their efforts are critical in an era of …
 
Gish Jen reads her story “Detective Dog,” from the November 22, 2021, issue of the magazine. Jen has published five novels, including “World and Town” and “The Resisters,” which came out last year, as well as the story collection “Who's Irish?” A new story collection, “Thank You, Mr. Nixon,” will come out in January.…
 
“Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992” premièred nearly thirty years ago, but it’s one of the most current and important plays on Broadway right now. Anna Deavere Smith pioneered a form now known as verbatim theatre: instead of creating characters and writing dialogue, she would interview dozens or hundreds of people about an event, and weave a story from t…
 
In August, 2020, during a period of civil unrest after the police shooting of Jacob Blake in Kenosha, Wisconsin, the seventeen-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse shot three people, killing two and maiming the third. Rittenhouse’s actions ignited a political firestorm. To some, he was a right-wing vigilante radicalized by conservative rhetoric about the thre…
 
In the U.S., nearly 200,000 people die every year from accidental injuries. But what happens when you cause one of those accidents—and you survive? We're looking for our next intern! Is it you? To find out more about eligibility and to apply, go to wnyc.org/careers. If you're not already subscribed to our newsletter, sign up! Every Wednesday, we se…
 
Growing up, Rachel Held Evans was a fiercely enthusiastic evangelizer for her faith, the kind of kid who relished the chance to sit next to an atheist. But when she experienced doubt, that sense of certainty began to crumble. “We went to all these conferences about how to defend your faith, how to have an answer for what you believe,” her sister Am…
 
Cal Newport, the author of “A World without Email” and other books, has been writing about how the shutdown has affected businesses and the culture of work. Remote operation, he says, has raised fundamental questions about the purpose of work, its role in our lives, and how productivity is measured. While most companies are asking employees to retu…
 
Yiyun Li reads her story “Hello, Goodbye,” from the November 15, 2021, issue of the magazine. Li is the author of two story collections and four novels, including “Where Reasons End” and “Must I Go,” which was published last year. She won the Windham-Campbell Literature Prize in 2020.By WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
 
Cal Newport, the author of “A World without Email” and other books, has been writing about how the shutdown has affected businesses and the culture of work. Remote operation, he says, has raised fundamental questions about the purpose of work, its role in our lives, and how productivity is measured. While most companies are asking employees to retu…
 
This week, the Republican Glenn Youngkin defeated the Democrat Terry McAuliffe to become the next governor of Virginia. Meanwhile, in New Jersey, the Democrat Phil Murphy narrowly won a gubernatorial race he was expected to dominate. The results further destabilize a Democratic Party struggling to find consensus on the infrastructure and social-spe…
 
A listener we're calling Jack wants to tell his dad that a passion for firearms is no longer something they share. We're looking for our next intern! Is it you? To find out more about eligibility and to apply, go to wnyc.org/careers. If you're not already subscribed to our newsletter, sign up! Every Wednesday, we send out podcast listening recommen…
 
Wole Soyinka is a giant of world literature. A Nobel laureate, he’s written more than two dozen plays, a vast amount of poetry, several memoirs, and countless essays and short stories—but, up until recently, only two novels. His third novel was published this past September, forty-eight years after the previous one. It's called “Chronicles from the…
 
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