show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
This week, a new app launched exploring the history of Dublin's Docklands. Where do the Docklands begin, and what remains are left of its industrial past? This episode explores the changing fortunes of Dublin's Docklands, and the working class communities who lived and worked alongside it. Oh, and a disappearing elephant! Dublin Discovery Trails: h…
 
On the outskirts of Dublin city, a series of memorial crosses mark sites were bodies were discovered in 1922 and 1923. A sad part of the Civil War conflict, they are a reminder of how the conflict deteriorated in the city. In a war with no clean hands, as discussed in this show, they show how former comrades could turn on one another. Historian Joh…
 
When Pele visited Dublin with Santos in 1972, one Irish newspaper proclaimed him to be "Soccer's Sinatra." In a country that came late to television - and which fell in love with the global game thanks in no small part to the magic of Pele in the 1970 World Cup - Santos vs Bohemians/Drumcondra was the hottest ticket in town. The game proved somewha…
 
Luke McManus has produced North Circular, a documentary which brings the viewer on a journey from the Wellington Testimonial all the way through the north inner-city. He chatted to me about the NCR, the various people who call it home and what it means for Dublin today. North Circular info: https://twitter.com/northcircular_ Vote for TCB for Eason'…
 
Each year, Dublin City Council hosts the Winter Lights festival, lighting up key buildings and sites around Dublin. Myself and historian Fergus Whelan went for a walk through some of the 2022 locations, from the Marshalsea Prison to Wolfe Tone Park. Did you know that the 'Father of the Scottish Enlightenment' is buried in Dublin, or that Smithfield…
 
Dermot Looney has spent years working away on a history of Saint Patrick's Athletic. The final product, which includes a beautiful introduction by Brian Kerr, is something much broader - an important social history of Inchicore. Saint Pat's emerge as a club strongly connected to the railway works, and with surprising connections from the very begin…
 
What can we learn about a subject by looking at 100 objects? Thanks to Siobhán Doyle, author of a new study 'A History of the GAA in 100 Objects', for getting into material culture, museums and the social history of the Gaelic Athletic Association with me. From Michael Cusack (was he 'The Citizen?') to yellow sliothars, we're talking about.....stuf…
 
Sam Stephenson (1933-2006) is one of the most important - and divisive - architects in the history of the Irish capital. As the Central Bank returns to view, we're looking at it and other Stephenson projects in the city. Some, like the Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies (DIAS), have recently become protected structures. Others have already been l…
 
Housing is today the issue of issues in Ireland, but what can we learn from looking back? Over the course of a century, the Irish state has had successes and failures when it comes to housing. Eoin Ó Broin is the author of Home: Why Public Housing is the Answer, he's also someone firmly at the centre of the political debates around housing in Irela…
 
In recent weeks, a headstone was unveiled in Deansgrange Cemetery honouring Kathleen and Stephen Behan. The parents at 70 Kildare Road in Crumlin, their children would produce an astonishing array of songs and plays capturing the Irish experience. This podcast includes voices from the day, as well as rich archive. Support TCB: www.patreon.com/three…
 
This episode of the podcast is dedicated to the memory of Mícheál Ó Doibhilín. In 1922, thousands of people from Belfast and other northern cities were arriving into Dublin and other places in the new Free State. Where would these people be housed, and what kind of life could they expect? There was surprising opposition to what the press termed the…
 
In Temple Bar, a plaque honours the Hirschfeld Centre. At Bow Lane East, an aging sign is all that remains of Incognito, a gay sauna that made it to the front of the international press in the early 1990s for all of the wrong reasons. Then there's Dublin Castle, a site of joy and scandal. These are just some of the many sites of memory that help us…
 
Last week, a series of commemorative brass plaques were unveiled on Dublin 8's Donore Avenue in honour of six victims of the Holocaust with connections to Dublin. These memorial stones are part of a truly global project honouring the victims of the Holocaust, but marked the first on Irish soil. This edition of the podcast explores the background to…
 
Sarah Cecilia Harrison (1863–1941) lived many lives in one. A Suffragist, a social campaigner, a nationalist and an artist, she was closely aligned with Hugh Lane in the battle for a modern art gallery in London. The first female member of Dublin Corporation, she is the subject of a new study. Editor Margarita Cappock joins me to discuss her import…
 
Joseph Brady is a geographer with a special interest in the changing landscape of the city and county of Dublin. A discussion on Dublin since the 1970s brings us through things like smog, the stinking Liffey, the quays and the changing docklands. Some change was good, some wasn't, and some remains on the table. Brady's new study Dublin from 1970 to…
 
Alderman Tom Kelly is one of Dublin's great forgotten heroes. A Councillor who championed housing (even before the houses of the city were collapsing in 1913) he came from Dublin's tenements and insisted on the need to replace them with good quality housing. Part of his legacy is The Tenters, a series of streets in Dublin 8. Cathy Scuffil is a Hist…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2023 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login