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The Host Unknown Podcast

51
The Host Unknown Podcast

Host Unknown, Thom Langford, Andrew Agnes, Javvad Malik

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Host Unknown is the unholy alliance of the old, the new and the rockstars of the infosec industry in an internet-based show that tries to care about issues in our industry. It regularly fails. With presenters that have an inflated opinion of their own worth and a production team with a pathological dislike of them (or “meat puppets” as it often refers to them), it is with a combination of luck and utter lack of good judgement that a show is ever produced and released. Host Unknown is availab ...
 
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This week in InfoSec (12:04) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account and further afield 24th June 1998: The NSA published the Skipjack encryption algorithm used by the Clipper chip, after the algorithm was declassified. Clipper Chip https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1275882063753699328 24th June 2012: In the wake …
 
This Week in InfoSec (08:56) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account and further afield 17th June 1997: Hackers deciphered computer code written in the Data Encryption Standard (DES), which had been designed to be an impenetrable encryption software. A group of users organised over the Internet cracked the software -- the…
 
This week in InfoSec (06:06) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account and further afield 3rd June 1983: The science fiction film WarGames is released. Notable for bringing the hacking phenomena to the attention of the American public, it ignites a media sensation regarding the hacker sub-culture. The film’s NORAD set is th…
 
This Week in InfoSec (07:52) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account and further afield 31st May 1999, Sega released the video game Zero Wing for the Sega Mega Drive system in Europe. The game was never released in North America, and was relatively unknown until years later when the poorly translated opening scene was pop…
 
The European Cybersecurity Blogger Awards 2022 - Vote Here! We’re the 5th category down: “The Underdogs - Best Non-Vendor Cybersecurity Podcast” This Week in InfoSec (06:25) With content liberated from the “Today in InfoSec” twitter account and further afield 26th May 1995: Realising his company had missed the boat in estimating the impact and popu…
 
This Week in InfoSec (07:03) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account and further afield 15th May 2003: In the Friends episode "The One in Barbados, Part One", Ross Geller's laptop was infected by the Kournikova worm when Chandler Bing checked his email on it and opened an email claiming to contain nude images of tennis pl…
 
This Week in InfoSec (07:30) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account and further afield 9th May 2006: Jeanson James Ancheta became the first person to be charged for controlling a botnet. He had hijacked around 500,000 computers and was sentenced to 57 months in prison, forfeiture of a 1993 BMW and $58,000 in profit, and …
 
This week in infosec I was a teenage botmaster Rant of the week (Thom, how do I add images to this section?) I want to use the images and description you used here https://podcast.hostunknown.tv/episodes/episode-102-end-of-an-era Never mind. I'll type it out. Rant is about EC Council being EC council Billy Big balls The Indian government has issued…
 
This Week in Infosec (09:52) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account and further afield [None] Rant of the Week (10:59) https://twitter.com/johnjhacking/status/1520877711094394884?s=21&t=nryrC32Sfqnyb1x0_0K2YA Full story: https://twitter.com/johnjhacking/status/1521629688120156160?s=21&t=nryrC32Sfqnyb1x0_0K2YA Billy Big b…
 
This Week in InfoSec (09:26) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account and further afield 26th April 2013: LivingSocial informed its employees that 50 million users' names, emails, dates of birth, and SHA1 hashed passwords were compromised. LivingSocial Hacked https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1519039747301199872 26…
 
This Week In InfoSec (10:15) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account and further afield 1st April 1998: Hackers changed the MIT home page to read "Disney to Acquire MIT for $6.9 Billion". https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1245550127806201857 MIT says "Disney buys MIT" hack revealed by low price 1st April 2004: The…
 
This Week in InfoSec (09:55) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account and further afield 31st March 1999: The hugely successful motion picture, The Matrix, is released on this day. Many call it a classic (ok, that’s me), many call it influential (ok, me again), but no one can deny that the impact it had on many aspects of …
 
Links https://www.theguardian.com/uk/canoe Authentication oufit Okta investigating Lapsus$ breach report Lapsus$: Oxford teen accused of being multi-millionaire cyber-criminal Netflix to Charge Password Sharers Background Check Company Sued Over Data Breach Okta Confirms 2.5% of Customers Impacted by Lapsus Breach Medical Service Leaks 12,000 Sensi…
 
This Week in InfoSec (08:06) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account and further afield 15th March 1985: The first Internet domain symbolics.com is registered by Symbolics, a Massachusetts computer company. 16th March 2018: National Lottery owner Camelot has warned of a "low level" cyber-attack that affected customer acco…
 
This Week in InfoSec (08:22) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account and further afield 6th March 1992: The Michelangelo virus, so-named because it activates on March 6, the birthday of Michelangelo, begins infecting computers. The virus will also make news in 1993. It was one of the earliest viruses to receive widespread…
 
This Week in InfoSec (08:37) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account and further afield 7th March 1997: During a hearing on Microsoft’s alleged antitrust activities, Bill Gates admits Microsoft’s contracts bar Internet content providers from promoting Netscape’s browser. Eventually, Internet Explorer dominates the web bro…
 
This Week in InfoSec (11:37) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account and further afield 23rd February 2005: The discovery of the first mobile phone virus, Cabir, is accounced. Specifically, Cabir is a worm which infects phones running the Symbian OS. Whenever an infected phone is activated, the message “Caribe” is display…
 
This Week in InfoSec (07:54) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account and further afield 15th February 1999 Computer owners (dominated by Linux users) marched on Microsoft’s offices demanding refunds for the copies of Windows that came pre-installed on their computers. This day came to be known as Windows Refund Day. 15th …
 
This Week in InfoSec (04:44) February 5th 2009 Come on Kaspersky, if you think you’re hard enough.. February 5th 2009 The Sophos snowball fight February 9th 2009 Hacked road sign warns of British invasion Rant of the Week (16:01) Hackers are hitting Britain where it hurts by targeting some of its favourite savoury snacks, with the likes of Hula Hoo…
 
This Week in InfoSec (05:24) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account and further afield 30th January 1982: The first computer virus was written. Richard Skrenta writes the first PC virus code, which is 400 lines long and disguised as an Apple II boot program called “Elk Cloner“. 3rd February 1986: "Vaporware" Announced. T…
 
This Week in InfoSec (07:20) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account and further afield 26th January 2011: Facebook Enables HTTPS So You Can Share Without Being Hijacked. Facebook announced Wednesday it would begin supporting a feature to protect users from having their accounts hijacked over Wi-Fi connections or snooped …
 
This Week in InfoSec (06:23) With content liberated from the “Today in InfoSec” twitter account and further afield 19th January 1999: The Happy99 worm first appeared. It invisibly attached itself to emails, displayed fireworks to hide the changes being made, and wished the user a happy New Year. It was the first of a wave of malware that struck Mic…
 
This week in Infosec (06:30) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 12th January 1981: Time Magazine published "Superzapping in Computer Land". Its primary focus was four 13-year-olds from New York City who broke into 2 computer networks and destroyed 1 million bits of data. Yes, a whopping 0.125 MB. Have a read of the a…
 
This Week in InfoSec (6:20) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 1st January 1997: The Cult of the Dead Cow admitted it was responsible for the Good Times virus hoax of 1994. Good times virus https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1212558619205607426 [Covered this story last month so will axe it] 2nd January 1975: G…
 
This Week in InfoSec With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 16th December 1988: 25-year-old computer hacker Kevin Mitnick was charged for crimes including theft of software from DEC (Digital Equipment Corporation), including VMS source code and allegedly causing $4 million in damages to DEC. Ex-Computer Whiz Kid Held on …
 
Andy’s mattress This Week in InfoSec (11:46) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 7th December 1999: The Recording Industry Association of America sues the peer-to-peer file sharing service Napster alleging copyright infringement for allowing users to download copyrighted music for free. The RIAA would eventually win i…
 
This Week in InfoSec (06:57) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 4th December 2013: Troy Hunt launched the site "Have I Been Pwned? (HIBP)". At launch, passwords from the Adobe, Stratfor, Gawker, Yahoo! Voices, and Sony Pictures breaches were indexed. https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1335020238765744129 1st D…
 
This Week in InfoSec (11:00) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 23rd November 2011: It was reported that Apple took over 3 years to fix the iTunes installer vulnerability which the FinFisher remote spying Trojan exploited. Apple Took 3+ Years to Fix FinFisher Trojan Hole https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1331…
 
IRISSCON - https://www.iriss.ie/ This week in Infosec (12:19) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 15th November 1994: The earliest known example of the Good Times email hoax virus was posted to the TECH-LAW mailing list. Variants of the hoax spread for several years. In 1997, Cult of the Dead Cow (cDc) claimed respons…
 
This Week in InfoSec (09:55) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 10th November 1983: At a security seminar, Len Adleman used "virus" in connection with self-replicating computer programs. Afterwards, use of the term took off. But it wasn't the first use of "virus" in this way - the 1973 movie "Westworld" used it to de…
 
This week in infosec With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account Honourable mention for the Morris Worm 3rd November 2000: A Dutch hacker gained access to Microsoft's network by exploiting a vulnerability Microsoft issued a patch for 10 weeks earlier. The Patch MS Forgot to Apply https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1323…
 
This Week in InfoSec (08:13) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 29th October 1969: The first message sent over the ARPANET was from Leonard Kleinrock’s UCLA computer, sent by student programmer Charley Kline at 10:30 PM to the second node at Stanford Research Institute’s computer in Menlo Park, California. The messag…
 
This Week in InfoSec (13:03) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 20th October 1996: Twenty-five years ago today. Happy birthday, Ping of Death. Ping of Death https://twitter.com/ajMSFT/status/1450833383597043713?s=20 15th October 1985: 50 FBI agents raided more than 20 homes, seizing 25 personal computers (mostly Comm…
 
This Week in Infosec With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 13th October 1999: An episode of the "True Life" documentary series titled "I'm a Hacker" aired on MTV. Afterwards one of the hackers featured on the show, Shamrock, issued a statement revealing that the whole thing was a hoax to dupe MTV. D'oh MTV made to look …
 
This Week in InfoSec (08:01) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 8th September 2009: FBI director Robert Mueller disclosed that his wife banned him from banking online after he nearly fell for an email phishing scam. Wife bans FBI head from online banking https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1314002293226905600 3…
 
Jav's Record Breakers 14th October https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/biggest-virtual-cybersecurity-lesson-tickets-166314899341 https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/organizers-of-security-serious-week-aim-to-set-new-guinness-world-records-title-for-viewership-of-an-online-security-lesson-301376191.html This week in Infosec With content liberated from …
 
This Week in InfoSec (04:56) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 18th September 2015: Google notified Symantec that the latter issued 23 test certificates for five organizations, including Google and Opera, without the domain owners' knowledge. Symantec performed an audit and announced that an additional 2,622 test ce…
 
This Week in InfoSec (04:09) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 16th September 2008: 20-year-old David Kernell compromised the Yahoo! email account of US vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin, then posted her emails to 4chan. 2 years later he was found guilty and sentenced to a year in prison. At age 30 he died of …
 
This Week in InfoSec (11:14) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 5th September 1983: The term "hacker" was used by Newsweek, mainstream media's earliest known use of the term in the pejorative sense. The magazine's cover photo of 17-year-old 414s (hacker group) member Neal Patrick was captioned '414 "Hacker" Neal Patr…
 
This Week in InfoSec With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 1st September 1997: Nmap was first released as a simple port scanner via an article in issue 51 of Phrack magazine which included the source code. http://phrack.org/issues/51/11.html https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1300864278497558528 31st August 2014:…
 
This week in Infosec (13:24) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 25th August 1991: Linux completes 30 years. It was on this date in 1991 that Linus Torvalds announced the first version. He actually wanted to call it as Freax, but his friend Ari Lemmke named it as Linux, which he accepted. Version 1.0 would later be re…
 
This week in Infosec With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 14th August 2013: Affinity Health Plan was fined $1,215,780 for a HIPAA violation after a photocopier purchased by CBS for an investigatory report in 2010 revealed medical info. At $1.2M, photocopy breach proves costly https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1…
 
This Week in Infosec (14:29) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 10th August 2001: A Japanese woman, Kumiyo Kishi, was arrested for accessing her coworker's email account, then contacting the user's ISP to regain access after the coworker changed their password. Japan arrests woman for email snooping https://twitter.c…
 
This Week in InfoSec (07:40) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 30th July 2013: Chelsea Manning (their name was Bradley Manning at the time) was found guilty of espionage, theft, and computer fraud, as well as military infractions. United States v Manning https://twitter.com/todayininfosec/status/1421171398656024587 …
 
This week in Infosec (06:42) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 27th July 1979: The first edition of Computer Security was published. It was written by David K. Hsiao, Douglas S. Kerr, and Stuart E. Madnick. And to think, some of you probably are surprised there were computers in 1979, never mind computer security! C…
 
This week in Infosec (08:10) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 16th July 2001: Russian programmer Dmitry Sklyarov was arrested the day after DEF CON for writing software to decrypt Adobe's e-book format. Charges against him were later dropped and the trial against his employer resulted in not guilty verdicts. United…
 
This week in Infosec (10.28) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 14th July 1998: Ethereal was first released publicly as version 0.2.0. Its creator, Gerald Combs, thought it was cool that Bob Metcalfe named Ethernet after luminiferous ether so he picked a name beginning with ether. Since 2006 the network protocol anal…
 
This weeks show is 33% off but the content is still as average as ever! This week in Infosec - 3 mins 11 secs Billy Big Balls - 12 mins 49 secs Rant of the week - 20 mins 52 secs Industry News - 30 mins 56 secs Tweet of the week - 38 mins 20 secs THIS WEEK IN INFOSEC With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 4th July 1994: …
 
This Week in InfoSec (08:03) With content liberated from the “today in infosec” twitter account 30th June 1998: AOL confirmed a leaked spreadsheet containing info of 1,300 AOL community leaders had been stolen from an employee's account. Not around then? AOL was kind of a big deal - it bought Time Warner in 2000 and was worth $200 billion before im…
 
This week in Infosec With content liberated from the “today in infosec” Twitter account 19th June 1987: The first Summercon hacker conference was held in St. Louis, Missouri and was run by the hacker zine Phrack. It's still going strong - the 33rd edition took place virtually last year with in-person attendance returning to NYC next month. https://…
 
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