show episodes
 
Risky Business is a weekly information security podcast featuring news and in-depth interviews with industry luminaries. Launched in February 2007, Risky Business is a must-listen digest for information security pros. With a running time of approximately 50-60 minutes, Risky Business is pacy; a security podcast without the waffle.
 
These are the audio tracks from Sports Cards Live (on YouTube), the live sports cards talk show where you are part of the show. Host and lifelong collector Jeremy Lee is joined by industry insiders, passionate collectors, content creators and engaging discussions ensue. Guests have Included: Karvin Cheung (Inventor of Exquisite & The Cup) Chris Carlin (Upper Deck), Brian Gray (Leaf CEO), Tim Getsch (COMC President), Jeromy Murray (President, Beckett), Ken Goldin (Goldin Auctions), Patrick Be ...
 
Christian Felix and Shonali Bhowmik became fast friends while working as temporary workers at a huge law firm in Manhattan. They share a love of laughing and giving each other hell. They may be called hipsters, old school, mainstream, irreverent, classic, country, gangster, or rock n' roll. All labels apply. Special guests, music, and attitude every episode. Past guests include: Jeremy O. Harris, Chelsea Peretti, Hannibal Buress, Keisha Zollar, H Jon Benjamin, Amber Tamblyn, JD Samson, Sanji ...
 
At Pilgrim Faith, human wonder fuels the quest for Christian wisdom. A podcast of The Davenant Institute, co-hosted by our Teaching Fellows Joseph Minich (PhD, University of Texas at Dallas)and Dale Stenberg (MDiv, Whitfield Theological Seminary), Pilgrim Faith hosts conversations with expert guests to engage contemporary issues with historic Christian wisdom.
 
Everyday consumers are being bombarded with the next “big thing” in health, wellness, and fitness. What’s the future of keeping ourselves healthy and what’s just a passing fad? Along with some of the best experts in the field, Joey will tackle diet fads, medicinal, fitness fads, bio-hacking and food fads. He’ll also experience the topic first hand, whether that’s jumping into a Cryo Chamber, completing a 5-day water fast, or going on a 30-day hot-new-diet. Fad or Future aims to provide clari ...
 
NumberOneBeats Weekly Radio Show Hosted By A.C.K. ! The Show will be presented in many different FM Radios like Radio FG USA, Number1 FM Turkey, Heat Radio Greece, We-love-house.fm Germany, DJR’ADIO, Daltica Radio, Clublovers fm, VIP TV and many more stations in different Countries like Belgium, Canada, Malta, Ibiza, Spain, U.S.A, Hungary, Bulgaria, Russia .... Near NumberOneBeats Records tracks supports the show also many talented new comers. Curtainly supporting and playing in the past and ...
 
In a world that seems to favor top performers, we often overlook the mindset and the methods of everyday entrepreneurs—the underdogs and the misfits who have no particular advantage in life—yet somehow manage to succeed. Author and entrepreneur Gary Schoeniger has traveled the world interviewing entrepreneurs and exploring the research to expose the hidden logic that exposes opportunities, optimizes engagement, and unleashes human potential. Whether you want to start a business, engage your ...
 
My Roots Are Showing is the new podcast from Irish arts journalist and broadcaster Nadine O'Regan, in which well known people in the world of culture and beyond reveal their stories and inspirations. Recent guests include the actor Domhnall Gleeson, director Lenny Abrahamson, Shirley Manson from the band Garbage and broadcaster and author Graham Norton.
 
The Ethical Recruiter is about offering inspiring storytellers from the business world a platform to positively disrupt, and empower change. Change to not just the recruitment process, but within the wider business and workplace community, overall. We seek to inspire business owners who might one day be considering recruiting, as well as other recruitment companies. This is NOT a recruitment podcast. If you're a candidate wanting careers advice, you'll definitely benefit from listening to th ...
 
Welcome to the "Speaking of Wealth" podcast showcasing profit strategies for speakers, publishers, authors, consultants, and info-marketers. Learn valuable skills to make your business more successful, more passive, more automated, and more scalable. Your host, Jason Hartman interviews top-tier guests, bestselling authors and experts including; Dan Poynter (The Self-Publishing Manual), Harvey Mackay (Swim With The Sharks & Get Your Foot in the Door), Dan Millman (Way of the Peaceful Warrior) ...
 
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show series
 
California is often used as a synecdoche for the United States itself - America in microcosm. Yet, California was, is, and will always be, Native space. This fact is forcefully argued by Damon Akins and William J. Bauer, Jr. in We Are the Land: A History of Native California (University of California Press, 2021). Akins, an associate professor hist…
 
How does the record industry work? In Getting Signed: Record Contracts, Musicians, and Power in Society (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), David Arditi, Associate Professor in Sociology and Anthropology at University of Texas at Arlington, analyses the ideology of getting signed and getting a record contract to show the alienating and exploitative effects…
 
Whether referring to a place, a nonhuman animal or plant, or a state of mind, wild indicates autonomy and agency, a unique expression of life. Yet two contrasting ideas about wild nature permeate contemporary discussions: either that nature is most wild in the absence of a defiling human presence, or that nature is completely humanized and nothing …
 
What is the future of the book? In Book Wars: The Digital Revolution in Publishing (Polity, 2021) John Thompson, Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge, examines the impact of digital technology on the publishing industry. The book grapples with broad questions of the changing nature of capitalism, the idea of information capital, an…
 
California is often used as a synecdoche for the United States itself - America in microcosm. Yet, California was, is, and will always be, Native space. This fact is forcefully argued by Damon Akins and William J. Bauer, Jr. in We Are the Land: A History of Native California (University of California Press, 2021). Akins, an associate professor hist…
 
Gospel music evolved in often surprising directions during the post-Civil Rights era. Claudrena N. Harold's in-depth look at late-century gospel, When Sunday Comes: Gospel Music in the Soul and Hip-Hop Eras (U Illinois Press, 2020), focuses on musicians like Yolanda Adams, Andraé Crouch, the Clark Sisters, Al Green, Take 6, and the Winans, and on t…
 
Kincraft: The Making of Black Evangelical Sociality (Duke University Press, 2021) by Todne Thomas takes a deep dive into the social and religious lives of two black evangelical churches in the Atlanta metro area. Thomas ethnographically renders the ways in which black evangelicals engage in a process of producing kin or crafting relatedness through…
 
Since the mid-nineteenth century, Americans have known the Adirondack Mountains of upstate New York as a site of industrial production, a place to heal from disease, and a sprawling outdoor playground that must be preserved in its wild state. Less well known, however, has been the area's role in hosting a network of state and federal prisons. A Pri…
 
Why did hundreds of thousands of Thai people rise up in opposition to elected governments in 2006, 2008 and 2013-14? What were the ideological underpinnings of the yellow shirt movement? How did the original People’s Alliance for Democracy differ from the later People’s Democratic Reform Committee? Were the yellow shirts simply trying to provoke mi…
 
I've had 18 years of formal education - why is writing so hard? Today's guests Dr Katherine Firth explains the disease's cure. The book Level Up Your Essays guides the reader through university essay writing, running through stages including essay plans, developing research strategies, writing with distinction, finishing strongly with editing, and …
 
Listen to this interview of Brooke Rollins, Assistant Professor of English at Lehigh University. We talk about lots of Greeks and about one Frenchman and (if you write) also about you. Brooke Rollins : "I think there is a way that practice in reading and writing–––that it lines up so nicely with physical training. You know, to run a marathon, you d…
 
During the years of the Early Republic, prominent Native leaders regularly traveled to American cities--Albany, Boston, Charleston, Philadelphia, Montreal, Quebec, New York, and New Orleans--primarily on diplomatic or trade business, but also from curiosity and adventurousness. They were frequently referred to as "the Chiefs now in this city" durin…
 
During the years of the Early Republic, prominent Native leaders regularly traveled to American cities--Albany, Boston, Charleston, Philadelphia, Montreal, Quebec, New York, and New Orleans--primarily on diplomatic or trade business, but also from curiosity and adventurousness. They were frequently referred to as "the Chiefs now in this city" durin…
 
Javier Guerrero's "Narcosubmarines: Outlaw Innovation and Maritime Interdiction in the War on Drugs" (Palgrave MacMillan, 2020) is about the encounters of Colombian drug smugglers and the Colombian Navy, both in the open seas and along coastlines. Guerrero specifically examines the technologies involved in the War on Drugs, such as the narcosubmari…
 
Constance Congdon's 2 Washington Square (Broadway Play Publishing, 2020) is a free-wheeling adaptation of Henry James' novel Washington Square set on the cusp of the 1960s as one era gives way to a startlingly different one. As always, Congdon's dialogue crackles with intensity and wit, echoing James' own razor-sharp observations of characters from…
 
In an age characterized by rampant anti-intellectualism, Kathleen Fitzpatrick in her 'Generous Thinking: A Radical Approach to Saving the University' (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2021) charges the academy with thinking constructively rather than competitively, building new ideas rather than tearing old ones down. She urges us to rethink how we …
 
In today's powerful conversation I'll be chatting with Leigh Ewin. Leigh coaches people around the world in the art of conscious breathwork. He's trained with several of the world’s top recognized breathwork evangelists and specializes in guiding group breathwork sessions and has a subtle yet powerful manner of which he brings people together. Leig…
 
Do you have all the Pillars of Wellness? Is your doctor looking at all of the markers for your health? Dr. Matt Chalmers is an award-winning chiropractor in Frisco, TX, where he lives with his beautiful wife Lulu, and his two boys, Zain and Laith. He was featured in the book How the Chiropractor Saved My Life by Dr. Deborah Bain and voted “Best in …
 
Author, Radio Host, and Theologian David L. Gray joins me today to discuss Critical Race Theory. We discuss how it originated, how it perpetuates a culture of victimhood, and other issues that spring from it. It is an interesting conversation. My internet was not the best during our interview and I did my best to edit dead air. I have reached out t…
 
In an “other world” composed of language—it could be a fathomless Martian well, a labyrinthine hotel, or forest—a narrative unfolds, and with it the experiences, memories, and dreams that constitute reality for Haruki Murakami’s characters and readers. Memories and dreams in turn conjure their magical counterparts—people without names or pasts, fan…
 
Every good story needs a villain, and some of the early chroniclers of the pilgrim and puritan settlements found all they needed for this type of character in Thomas Morton. Peter C. Mancall tells the story in The Trials of Thomas Morton: An Anglican Lawyer, His Puritan Foes, and the Battle for a New England (Yale UP, 2019), in what reads perhaps l…
 
This Ideas Roadshow Collection includes five Ideas Roadshow books that have been developed from filmed wide-ranging conversations with the following leading neuroscientists: Lisa Feldman Barrett (Northeastern University), Jennifer Groh (Duke University), Kalanit Grill-Spector (Stanford University), John Duncan (Cambridge University) and Miguel Nico…
 
Every good story needs a villain, and some of the early chroniclers of the pilgrim and puritan settlements found all they needed for this type of character in Thomas Morton. Peter C. Mancall tells the story in The Trials of Thomas Morton: An Anglican Lawyer, His Puritan Foes, and the Battle for a New England (Yale UP, 2019), in what reads perhaps l…
 
In recent times, US-Russia relations have deteriorated to what both sides acknowledge is an “all time low.” Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election and Putin’s continued support for the Assad regime in Syria have placed enormous strain on this historically tense and complex relationship. In Russia and America: The Asymmetric Rival…
 
Shake and Bake is the story of Archie Clark, one of the top playmaking guards in the 1970s pre-merger NBA. While not one of the game’s most recognized superstars, Clark was a seminal player in NBA history who staggered defenders with the game’s greatest crossover dribble (“shake and bake”) and is credited by his peers as the originator of today’s p…
 
For most of the eighteenth century, British protestantism was driven neither by the primacy of denominations nor by fundamental discord between them. Instead, it thrived as part of a complex transatlantic system that bound religious institutions to imperial politics. As Katherine Carte argues, British imperial protestantism proved remarkably effect…
 
It is lady's night on Sports Cards Live! We sit down with Kristina Thorson, Co-Founder of Card Ladder and from the House of Jordans Podcast and Sports Card Culture on YouTube to discuss how she got into the hobby, her love of going to shops, collecting with a partner, her role at Card Ladder, the upcoming National, being a woman in the hobby and a …
 
In an era of rampant Islamophobia, literary representations of Muslims and anti Muslim bigotry tell us a lot about changing concepts of cultural difference. In Islamophobia and the Novel (Columbia University Press, 2018), Peter Morey, Professor at the University of Birmingham, analyzes how recent works of fiction have framed and responded to the ri…
 
Twelve companies of American missionaries were sent to the Hawaiian Islands between 1819 and 1848 with the goal of spreading American Christianity and New England values. By the 1850s American missionary families in the islands had birthed more than 250 white children, considered Hawaiian subjects by the indigenous monarchy and U.S. citizens by mis…
 
In 2014 and 2015, students at dozens of colleges and universities held protests demanding increased representation of Black and Latino students and calling for a campus climate that was less hostile to students of color. Their activism recalled an earlier era: in the 1960s and 1970s, widespread campus protest by Black and Latino students contribute…
 
A new approach to puritan studies has been emerging in recent decades, but until now, no single volume has tried to gather in a comprehensive way the new histories of this literature. In A History of American Puritan Literature (Cambridge UP, 2020), edited by Kristina Bross and Abram Van Engen, eighteen leading scholars in the field help to mark a …
 
Despite enormous advances in medical science and public health education over the last century, access to health care remains a dominant issue in American life. U.S. health care is often hailed as the best in the world, yet the public health emergencies of today often echo the public health emergencies of yesterday: consider the Great Influenza Pan…
 
Most music students have been taught that the New World Symphony was the first piece of classical music written in an American national style which Antonín Dvorák invented when he utilized influences from Black music in the second movement. The impression most textbooks leave is that this innovation was instantly approved by composers and critics a…
 
Despite enormous advances in medical science and public health education over the last century, access to health care remains a dominant issue in American life. U.S. health care is often hailed as the best in the world, yet the public health emergencies of today often echo the public health emergencies of yesterday: consider the Great Influenza Pan…
 
In this episode, I interview Anahid Nersessian, professor of English at UCLA, about her book, Keats’s Odes: A Lover’s Discourse (University of Chicago Press, 2021). In 1819, the poet John Keats wrote six poems that would become known as the Great Odes. Some of them—“Ode to a Nightingale,” “To Autumn”—are among the most celebrated poems in the Engli…
 
A new approach to puritan studies has been emerging in recent decades, but until now, no single volume has tried to gather in a comprehensive way the new histories of this literature. In A History of American Puritan Literature (Cambridge UP, 2020), edited by Kristina Bross and Abram Van Engen, eighteen leading scholars in the field help to mark a …
 
Dr. Kenneth Howell joins me today to discuss the Eucharist and the early church fathers. He recently wrote book titled "Mystery of the Altar" which provides a daily reflection about the eucharist based on the wisdom of the saints. Dr. Howell has done extensive work in translating the work of the church fathers particularly in regard to the Eucharis…
 
The private tax returns of America's wealthiest few individuals were just leaked to the non-profit journalists at ProPublica and they reveal an American plutocracy that has completely avoided paying personal taxes. We already knew that the wealthiest corporations were able to maneuver the tax code to their benefit, but the levels at which the ultra…
 
One year to the day after George Flloyd’s murder, Dr. Jamila Lyiscott discusses her book on racial justice in education: Black Appetite. White Food. Issues of Race, Voice, and Justice Within and Beyond the Classroom (Routledge, 2019) A community-engaged scholar-activist, nationally renowned speaker and spoken word artist, Assistant Professor of Soc…
 
He's the destroyer of evil, the pervasive one in whom all things lie. He is brilliant, terrifying, wild and beneficent. He is both an ascetic and a householder, both a yogi and a guru. He encompasses the masculine and the feminine, the powerful and the graceful, the Tandava and the Laasya, the darkness and the light, the divine and the human. What …
 
What does ethnography look like when presented as fiction? In this episode, we talk with Alexandros Plasatis, author of the new book Made by Sea and Wood, in Darkness (Spuyten Duyvil, 2021) a linked book of short stories based on the lives of Egyptian immigrant fishermen and other marginalized residents of a Greek town. Alexandros describes the fie…
 
Tonight's (June 5) After Hours Guest is Chris McGill, Co-Founder of Card Ladder and Co-Host of Sports Cards Culture. We debrief the Nat Turner episode and talk about the Babe Ruth "record" sale. Saturday Night at 9:15pm PST / 12:15am PST after your regularly scheduled episode of Sports Cards Live. YouTube.com/c/sportscardslive #cardladder #sportsca…
 
As regular listeners know, the soap box podcasts we publish here at Risky.Biz are wholly sponsored. That means everyone you hear in one of these podcasts, paid to be here. And this edition of Soap Box has become an annual thing – it’s our once-yearly catch up with Jerrod Chong, the chief solutions officer of Yubico, makers of the Yubikey and YubiHS…
 
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