Oregon Chapter Of The Wildlife Society public
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Sourcing accurate scientific information can be difficult in this age of polarized content. The goal of the podcast is to give you the opportunity to hear directly from the experts, through long-form conservation about natural history and conservation. This podcast is produced by the Oregon Chapter of The Wildlife Society in partnership with the Oregon Wildlife Foundation. Hosted by John Goodell. John is a wildlife biologist, curator, and conservation educator. He is the President of the Ore ...
 
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Dominique Kone joins us to discuss his M.S. research and recent publication last February informing a prospective sea otter reintroduction in Oregon. He addresses habitat suitability in Oregon, population growth scenarios, and more. His research is a key piece of information suggesting that a sea otter reintroduction is feasible in Oregon, but deci…
 
Professor and Curator Dr. Madonna Moss is an anthropological archaeologist who studies the long term history of Native Americans and First Nations of the Northwest Coast of North America, with a special focus on Tlingit and Haida and their ancestors. Join us for a fascinating discussion about how zooarcheology can help defend indigenous cultural pr…
 
In this episode three leaders from Oregon coast tribes provide heartfelt reflections, as they frame the loss of sea otters and the vision of its return with the history of their own people’s struggles, and how sea otters represent their own interconnectedness to the natural world. Don Ivy Chief of the Coquille Indian tribe; Robert Kentta the Siletz…
 
Dr. Roberta Hall is an anthropologist and Professor Emeritus at Oregon State University. Roberta conducted numerous excavations of shell midden sites on the Oregon coast where she document use of various wildlife including sea otters, and other marine resources by ancient First Peoples. Roberta holds expertise in zoo-archaeology, medical anthropolo…
 
Marine Biologist and Researcher Dr. Shawn Larson from the Seattle Aquarium discusses sea otters up-close! Shawn explores sea otter diet, physiology, reproduction, and genetics - and how her research informs conservation. Video of Shawn presenting her genetics research at the 2018 Oregon Sea Otter Status of Knowledge Symposium https://www.youtube.co…
 
A great conversation with leading sea otter researcher Dr. Tim Tinker. Tim discusses new science and reveals the varied issues effecting sea otter populations across their pacific range - from Alaska to California - including his perspectives on a possible Oregon reintroduction. Produced in Partnership with the Elakha Alliance…
 
Tom Calvanese is a rockfish scientist, the Station Manager of the Port Orford Field Station, and a catalyst behind developing action to address kelp declines along Oregon's south coast. Join us for a multi-dimensional conversation about kelp conservation. Produced in partnership with the Elakha Alliance A great resource from the NOYO Center for Mar…
 
Renowned ecologist Jim Estes shares his story of discovery - from a young graduate student on the Aleutian Islands to scientific breakthroughs revealing the profound ecological effects of a keystone predator Produced in partnership with the Elakha Alliance Jim's memoir: https://www.amazon.com/Serendipity-Ecologists-Understand-Organisms-Environments…
 
Marine biologist Scott Groth is undertaking one of the longest monitoring projects on Oregon's nearshore. While red sea urchin numbers appear normal, purple sea urchin populations have exploded in recent years with alarming impacts to kelp forests. Produced in partnership with the Elakha Alliance Articles about Scott's work: https://newportnewstime…
 
A fascinating window into new discoveries in kelp ecology and conservation with Sara Hamilton - a leading researcher studying trends in kelp forests. Sara is a PhD student at Oregon State University. Part one of a series produced in partnership with the Elakha Alliance Links to learn more: A story map compiled by the Samish tribe and others about t…
 
Geology is a fundamental discipline to major biological concepts such as evolution and biogeography. Join me in a fascinating conversation with Geologist Andrew J. Meigs as he explains the geologic principles behind plate tectonics, volcanism, and mountain-building in the Pacific Northwest. Andrew is a Professor of Geology at Oregon State Universit…
 
Great conversation with Selina Heppell, the Chair of the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Selina discusses her research, describes her department's strategy for the future, and reflects on better ways to attract, train, inspire, and support the next generation of wildlife professionals. OSU Dept of Fisheries and Wild…
 
An inspiring discussion with three leaders in wildlife science and management. Harriet Allen, Evie Merrill, and Wini Kessler are recognized for their scientific accomplishments while leading wildlife programs in state and federal agencies and academia. In addition to their scientific credentials, they are pioneering trailblazers and mentors for wom…
 
A fascinating discussion with Dr. David Shepherdson about the role of zoos in conservation. As the Deputy Director of Conservation at the Oregon Zoo, David discusses how zoos are becoming an essential foundation of conservation success; from the most significant voices in conservation education to leading experts in endangered species recovery prog…
 
Free-roaming horses and burros represent one of the most challenging and complex issues in the realm of western public land policy. In this episode we talk with Keith Norris, the Director of Policy and Communications with The Wildlife Society. Keith gives an overview of the issues and reveals important science based details and perspectives often l…
 
A great conversation with Christian Hagen and Jeremy Maestas about the natural history and conservation of the greater sage-grouse. Christian is a leading grouse scientist and research professor at OSU. Jeremy is a sagebrush ecologist at the NRCS and part of the Sage Grouse Initiative team implementing grouse conservation projects on private lands …
 
In this episode we join leading bat experts Dr. Tom Rodhouse and Roger Rodriguez to discuss the natural history and conservation of bats. Tom and Roger reveal fascinating facts about bat biology while also discussing their research, and new impacts to bat populations in the Pacific Northwest and beyond. To learn more about the Northwest Bat Hub: ht…
 
In this episode we discuss sea otter population restoration with Robert Bailey, the Board President of the Elakha Alliance. "Elakha" is the Chinook and Clatsop Indian word for sea otter. In the late 1990s, the Elakha Alliance was organized by members of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Coquille Indian Tribe and others to promote the r…
 
A discussion with Monty Gregg, a wildlife biologist with the USFS, about implementing conservation projects using the power of partnerships. Proactive conservation on our public lands is a critical,yet challenging goal in an era of declining funds and little public support. Monty discusses his approach to partnerships - demonstrating how non-govern…
 
Part three of a three part series dedicated to the naturalist and explorer, John Kirk Townsend. In 1839, Townsend published his journal as a book entitled "A Narrative of a Journey Across the Rocky Mountains to the Columbia River". The journal recounts the then 24 year old's trip from Missouri to the mouth of the Columbia River in 1834, with fellow…
 
Part two of a series dedicated to the naturalist and explorer, John Kirk Townsend. In 1839, Townsend published his journal as a book entitled "A Narrative of a Journey Across the Rocky Mountains to the Columbia River". The journal recounts the then 24 year old's trip from Missouri to the mouth of the Columbia River in 1834, with fellow naturalist a…
 
Part one of a series dedicated to the naturalist and explorer, John Kirk Townsend. In 1839, Townsend published his journal as a book entitled "A Narrative of a Journey Across the Rocky Mountains to the Columbia River". The journal recounts the then 24 year old's trip from Missouri to the mouth of the Columbia River in 1834, with fellow naturalist a…
 
This episode is primarily oriented to students, early professionals, and others considering wildlife careers. We explore the various career tracks in the wildlife profession with Quentin Hays, a wildlife biologist and professor who brings personal perspectives from his diverse work in agency, academic, and private sectors. Instead of delving into s…
 
A fascinating conversation with wildlife biologist Paul Henson about Endangered Species Act implementation. Paul is the State Director for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Oregon Office where, among other duties, he supervises a team of dedicated biologists who implement ESA recovery strategies across a spectrum of listed species. Paul discusse…
 
Few issues are more important than the over-arching capacity to fund conservation now and into the future. In this episode we explore a key piece of funding legislation recently introduced to the Oregon State legislature, HB 2829, The Oregon Conservation and Recreation Fund. It's successful passage requires immediate support from Oregonians. We exp…
 
A conversation with biologists Brian Bangs and Chris Allen about a pioneering success story recovering the once Endangered Oregon Chub. The Oregon Chub was de-listed in 2015 - the first fish ever removed from the federal Endangered Species Act list. Brian is a native fish biologist and Oregon Chub project lead for ODFW. Chris Allen is an endangered…
 
An eye-opening conversation with Dr. Burke Hales and Dr. George Waldbusser about the effects of ocean acidification on ocean ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest. Professors and research partners at Oregon State University, Burke and George definitively linked an increase in ocean acidification to the collapse of oyster seed production at a commerci…
 
Leland Brown with the Oregon Zoo, and Jim Akenson with the Oregon Hunter's Association discuss lead exposure in scavenging birds of prey, and how to increase hunter adoption of non-lead ammunition. Leland is a hunter, wildlife biologist, and the Non-lead Hunting Education Coordinator at the Oregon Zoo. Leland is a national leader in building outrea…
 
A fascinating conversation with Taal Levi, Assistant Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Taal is a geneticist and ecologist with a broad research focus including assessing the ecological consequences of wildlife over-exploitation, fisheries management, the ecology and conservation of predators, disease …
 
A conversation with Mark Penninger about the natural history and conservation of the bighorn sheep. Mark is the Forest Biologist for the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest, and a bighorn sheep and mountain goat specialist. Called the "koepa" by the Northern Paiute people, the bighorn sheep is an icon of the mountain West; yet complex disease issues ha…
 
A fascinating conversation with Michael P. Nelson, an environmental scholar, writer, teacher, speaker, consultant, and Professor of Environmental Ethics and Philosophy. He holds the Ruth H. Spaniol Chair of Renewable Resources and serves as the Lead Principal Investigator for the HJ Andrews Experimental Forest Long-Term Ecological Research program …
 
A conversation with Kim Nelson, a Research Wildlife Biologist in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University. Kim is a leading researcher on pacific seabirds and particularly the marbled murrelet. The marbled murrelet is listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act and listed as endangered in California and Washingt…
 
The North American Model of Wildlife Conservation is considered an exemplary example of success but new challenges loom on the horizon. In this episode, we will be talking to Davia Palmeri, the Conservation Policy Coordinator with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Davia is an expert on conservation policy. Davia will discuss the history o…
 
A conversation with Jay Bowerman, a leading Oregon herpetologist and expert on the Oregon Spotted Frog. Jay received his B.S. and M.S. from the University of Oregon, and has been a researcher and conservation educator in Central Oregon over the last 40 years. Jay reveals the unique natural history and conservation of this imperiled species. To supp…
 
Postscript: This episode was recorded in early September, 2018. On February 5th, 2019 Tom passed away at the age of 91. We are saddened to hear the news of his passing. As a leader in the field of conservation biology, he leaves a global legacy and an model of conservation action to emulate. The Peregrine Fund's page In Memorium: https://www.peregr…
 
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