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Gastropod

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Gastropod

Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley

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Food with a side of science and history. Every other week, co-hosts Cynthia Graber and Nicola Twilley serve up a brand new episode exploring the hidden history and surprising science behind a different food- or farming-related topic, from aquaculture to ancient feasts, from cutlery to chile peppers, and from microbes to Malbec. We interview experts, visit labs, fields, and archaeological digs, and generally have lots of fun while discovering new ways to think about and understand the world t ...
 
Each week we bring you a new, in-depth exploration of the space where science and society collide. We’re committed to the idea that making an effort to understand the world around you though science and critical thinking can benefit everyone—and lead to better decisions. We want to find out what’s true, what’s left to discover, and why it all matters.
 
The Science series presents cutting-edge research about biology, physics, chemistry, ecology, geology, astronomy, and more. These events appeal to many different levels of expertise, from grade school students to career scientists. With a range of relevant applications, including medicine, the environment, and technology, this series expands our thinking and our possibilities.
 
The Architect Podcast Network is a production of ARCHITECT, the journal of the American Institute of Architects. Here, we talk with the innovators working at the cutting edge of design, technology, and practice in architecture.
 
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Quarantining during COVID certainly wasn’t the first time we’ve had to restrict our movements to prevent the spread of disease. Far from it. Take, for instance, that time in the 14th century when the Black Death decimated populations (killing off, some suggest, 60% of the entire European population). And take some other alarming maladies like yello…
 
It seems like it’s been a couple months since the last ‘up to date’ segment of the podcast, so Adam Bristol is back to share just what exactly has been on his mind lately. From genetically modified mosquitoes to NASA knocking asteroids off course, it turns out there’s quite a lot occupying his thoughts. Not to be outdone, Indre counters with some p…
 
We’re not to blame for climate change. It’s a part of the natural cycle. The earth is flat. The round Earth conspiracy is orchestrated by NASA and other government agencies. No one should get the coronavirus vaccine. Bill Gates wants to use it to implant microchips in people. This is, of course, all bunk. But how can we change the minds of people w…
 
If you’ve ever engaged in mortal combat with a patch of ragweed, dandelion, or crabgrass in your garden, you might understand the twin emotions of rage and begrudging admiration when it comes to weeds: They. Just. Won’t. Die. When it comes to commercial agriculture, weeds pose a more existential threat—globally, the proportion of our harvest that i…
 
There aren’t many in this world who can be called a real-life Lorax. In fact, there’s just one: Dr. Meg Lowman. Lowman was nicknamed that by National Geographic for her enthusiasm and knowledge of all things trees. A true tree hugger, Lowman, executive director of the TREE Foundation, has been up in the branches and crowns for decades, learning and…
 
If there’s one thing we can probably all agree on, it’s that water is a necessary component for life, right? Well, here to muddy up that argument is the adorable tardigrade which, it turns out, can survive extreme drying or dehydration, and can be revived by simply adding water. Much of what is known about these remarkable creatures comes courtesy …
 
Bourbon has to be aged in barrels, by law; whiskey usually spends years in barrels, by custom; and between 20-30 percent of wine spends some time in one. And almost all of those wooden vessels are made from just two kinds of tree: American white oak and French oak. This episode, we tell the story—and try the whiskey—of the distiller and the barrel-…
 
Why do Black people have a higher death rate than white people from COVID-19? Why do the working class have higher instances of respiratory diseases? If someone is saddled with debt, what does that do to their bodies? Inflamed illuminates the hidden relationships between our biological systems and the injustices of our political, social, and econom…
 
Nina Kraus, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist who has done groundbreaking research on sound and hearing for more than three decades. She's the Hugh Knowles Professor of Neurobiology, Communication Sciences, and Otolaryngology at Northwestern University, and she has been a frequent guest on Indre’s other podcast, Cadence: What Music Tells Us About the Mind…
 
“If there is magic on this planet,” anthropologist Loren Eiseley said, “it is contained in water.” Humans have been trying to contain that magic for millennia. Giulio Boccaletti knows this more than most anyone. With Water: A Biography, Boccaletti showcased the revealing history of how the distribution of water has shaped human civilization. We all…
 
Who among us hasn’t, at some point, wondered just what exactly a bear manager or a danger tree feller blaster does? Well, Mary Roach, America’s funniest science writer, TED 20 Most Watched list member, and increasingly frequent guest on this podcast has, and now she’s written a book for our collective enlightenment. In today’s episode, Mary discuss…
 
There are bird nests that you can eat. Some birds go “anting,” a behavior in which they rub ants all over their feathers and skin. A mockingbird can emit up to 200 distinct noises. These facts, and many more, are encapsulated in Christopher Leahy’s new book, Birdpedia: A Brief Compendium of Avian Lore. Leahy highlights his A to Z treasury of bird f…
 
For a lot of Americans, tofu conjures up images of bland, squishy cubes: a sorry alternative to meat. Even in Asia, where tofu was born, the soybean was initially seen as unappetizing, not to mention flatulence inducing. This episode, we tell the story of how people in what's now northeastern China figured out how to turn this legume of last resort…
 
No one would be surprised to hear that anxiety has become a staple of modern life, particularly over the past year and a half, but what may surprise some is that anxiety is a necessary component in our lives that can be managed and kept at a level which actually optimizes our performance. On today’s podcast, Indre is joined by the legendary Dr. Wen…
 
Indre welcomes back Sam Kean, the New York Times bestselling author of The Icepick Surgeon, The Bastard Brigade, Caesar's Last Breath, The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons, and more. Sam has won many awards for his writing, and he's been featured on Radiolab, All Things Considered, and of course, Inquiring Minds. His own podcast, The Disappearing …
 
Four bakers, one evening, and one challenge: Who can steam the best spotted dick? On this week’s action-packed episode, Tom Gilliford, Selasi Gbormittah, and Yan Tsou of Great British Bake-Off fame, along with honorary Gastropod member (and Cynthia’s partner) Tim Buntel, compete to see who can master this most classic of British puddings for the fi…
 
Protecting wild animals and preserving the environment are two ideals so seemingly compatible as to be almost inseparable. But in reality, between animal welfare and conservation science there exists a space of underexamined and unresolved tension: wildness itself. When is it right to capture or feed wild animals for the good of their species? How …
 
Of all the side effects of opioid use that exist, one that is only recently starting to get the attention it deserves is that of becoming amnestic. That doesn’t mean that this effect hasn’t been on the radar of some researchers over the years, though. As far back as 2016, Neurology Specialist, Dr. Jed Barash, brought some case studies to Indre’s at…
 
If you thought it was high time for us to get into the weeds with cannabis science and economics, then you’re in the right place: Welcome back to part two of our miniseries on cannabis edibles! This episode, we meet with leading cannabis researcher Adie Rae to figure out the biology behind the difference between inhaling and eating weed, as well as…
 
One undeniable side effect of the pandemic is that a lot of parents have spent far more time than they ever expected with their kids, and more often than not were left questioning their own parenting decisions frequently along the way. Given that, Melinda Wenner Moyer’s new book, How To Raise Kids Who Aren’t Assholes, could not be more timely as it…
 
As Adam wisely notes, ‘Science forges ahead’, making it high time for another ‘up to date’ segment of Inquiring Minds where he and Indre examine some recent instances of science in the news that they find particularly interesting. From tutoring parrots to migratory bird seed spreaders to the sheer beauty of Adam’s kombucha-infused microbiome, you’r…
 
Edible cannabis products are hot right now: Snoop's got some, Willie Nelson's got some—even Martha Stewart's making fancy French-style gummies. In states where it’s legal, you can buy everything from marshmallows to macarons, all laden with THC, the psychoactive compound in cannabis. This commercial boom may be recent, but the history of edibles go…
 
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