Khn And Just Human Productions public
[search 0]
More

Download the App!

show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
Over 70% of Indigenous people in the United States live in urban areas. But urban Indian health makes up less than 2% of the Indian Health Service’s annual budget. While enrolled members of federally recognized tribes can access the Indian Health Service or tribally run health care on their reservations, Indigenous people who live in cities can fin…
 
Lanor Curole is a member of the United Houma Nation. She grew up in Golden Meadow, a small bayou town in Southern Louisiana. The impacts of repetitive flooding in the area forced her to move farther north. Louisiana’s coastal wetlands lose about 16 square miles of land each year. This land loss, pollution from the 2010 BP oil spill, and lingering d…
 
Mending broken trust may be a first step for investigators who want to increase the participation of Native people in medical research. “There's such a history of extractive research in Indigenous communities, such that ‘research’ and ‘science’ are sometimes dirty words,” said Navajo geneticist and bioethicist Krystal Tsosie. Poor communication and…
 
Correction: This episode was updated on July 27, 2022, to accurately characterize Dr. Charles Eastman’s academic milestone. In 1890, Dr. Charles Eastman became one of the first Native people to graduate from medical school in the United States. Today, one of his descendants, Victor Lopez-Carmen, is a third-year student at Harvard Medical School. He…
 
Abby Abinanti is chief judge of the Yurok Tribal Court and a member of the tribe. While previously working in the California court system, she was discouraged and angered by the number of cases in which Indigenous families were separated or tribal members were removed from their communities because of nontribal foster care placements or incarcerati…
 
Rachael Lorenzo works to address reproductive health disparities in Native communities. In 2018, they founded Indigenous Women Rising, a fund that provides financial help for Native people seeking an abortion. Historically, the federal government has restricted Native people’s reproductive autonomy. Between 1973 and 1976, more than 3,500 Native peo…
 
In 2020, during the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic, Zoel Zohnnie was feeling restless. Growing up on the Navajo Nation, he said, the importance of caring for family and community was instilled at an early age. So Zohnnie wanted to find a way to help members of his tribe. One need in particular stood out: water. American Indian and Alaska Na…
 
Editor’s Note: This episode includes descriptions of violence that some might find disturbing. Intimate partner violence, also known as domestic violence, can take the form of physical, sexual, or psychological abuse. If you or someone you know is experiencing intimate partner violence, help is available. StrongHearts Native Helpline provides cultu…
 
People living on and near the Navajo Nation have been grappling with the legacy of 40-plus years of uranium mining. According to EPA cleanup reports and congressional hearings, mines were abandoned, radioactive waste was left out in the open, and groundwater was contaminated. This episode is the second half of a two-part series about uranium mining…
 
On the morning of July 16, 1979, a dam broke at a uranium mine near Church Rock, New Mexico, releasing 1,100 tons of radioactive waste and pouring 94 million gallons of contaminated water into the Rio Puerco. Toxic substances flowed downstream for nearly 100 miles, according to a report to a congressional committee that year. In the 1970s, uranium …
 
Reagan Wytsalucy was looking for a lost orchard. Martin Reinhardt wanted to know more about and better understand the taste of Indigenous foods before European colonization in North America. They followed different paths, but their goals were similar: to reclaim their food traditions to improve the health and vitality of their communities. Native f…
 
Travel to the forests outside the Grand Canyon to follow Dr. Sophina Calderon and other Navajo Nation leaders as covid-19 tests the Diné people. Roughly 30% of the homes on the Navajo Nation rely on wood-burning stoves for heat. Many of those households haul wood from nearby forests. That’s what Calderon was doing when she realized the pandemic’s r…
 
In the years leading up to the pandemic, Dr. Celine Gounder, the host of the American Diagnosis and EPIDEMIC podcasts, had the opportunity to care for patients part-time at several Indian Health Service facilities around the United States. Working on the “rez,” one theme came up over and over: resilience. In this latest season of American Diagnosis…
 
"Science is harmed when scientists don't take into account the bias that comes along with inherently being a human." -Kafui Dzirasa As a result of centuries of discrimination, and lack of access to education and opportunity, African Americans comprise only 5% of active physicians in the United States today. Former-Surgeon General David Satcher, who…
 
"Nobody really wants to leave their community and I don't blame them because it's our culture and we shouldn't have to move just to have clean air to breathe. That should be God-given right to drink clean water, to breathe clean air.” -Hilton Kelley During the modern environmental movement of the late 60’s and early 70’s, landmark legislation was p…
 
"As we enter into a time of climate change, one of the things we're realizing is these communities that have been systematically oppressed are now the spaces people with money want to be in because all around us is sinking" - Nicole Crooks In this bonus episode of AMERICAN DIAGNOSIS, we’re going to look at how climate change is impacting the health…
 
"This can't continue to go on and if I have to be the one to take up the mantle, then I'll do that because that's what my daughter would have done." -Wanda Irving The United States is the richest country in the world with some of the most advanced medical treatments available anywhere. But you’d never know it if you knew how many mothers die in — a…
 
"We used to be a nation where people were one bad gene or one bad traffic accident away from bankruptcy. That's not true anymore." -Jonathan Gruber It's been 10 years since President Barack Obama signed the Affordable Care Act into law. Some of its most popular provisions included protections for people with pre-existing conditions, allowing childr…
 
Transcript “Despite all of those other cues, my white coat, my scrubs, you know, somebody just looked out the window and saw danger. And even the officers who came to talk to me couldn't override their biases that said danger. And this is not a unique experience at all. I have friends, particularly black men who have trained at some of the best ins…
 
EPIDEMIC is a new, weekly podcast on the coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2 / COVID-19). Hear from some of the world’s leading infectious disease and public health experts. We’ll help you understand the latest science, the bigger context, and bring you diverse angles—from history and anthropology to politics and economics—depth and texture you won’t get elsew…
 
Tomorrow is the second anniversary of the Parkland shooting. How have the survivors channeled their grief into advocacy? What were some of the tough lessons they had to learn about inclusion along the way? And how do we all move forward as a nation together? Guests: David Hogg and Tyah-Amoy Roberts, student members of the Board of Directors of the …
 
Black and brown communities have borne the brunt of gun violence for decades. But when it comes to the national debate about gun safety or gun violence prevention, their efforts have largely been overlooked. Now that new constituencies have come to the table, how do we make sure POC don’t just have a seat, but a real voice? Guests: Kayla Hicks, Dir…
 
Joseph Sakran was shot in the neck as a teenager. He went on to become a trauma surgeon. When the NRA tweeted doctors should "stay in their lane," Joseph and others were outraged. Joseph started #ThisIsOurLane, an umbrella for health care providers and all the other communities who've lived and borne witness to gun violence. Guests: Dr. Joseph Sakr…
 
Vets know guns and gunfights better than most of us. Guns are a big part of their identity. So why have so many stepped up to speak out in favor of gun safety and gun reform? Guests: Peter Lucier, Marine veteran, Afghanistan; Kyleanne Hunter, Vice President of Programs for the Brady Campaign, U.S. Marine Corps Legislative Liaison Officer, and Marin…
 
For a long time, there was a passion gap between the gun-rights and gun violence prevention movements. But then Sandy Hook and Parkland sparked a change… for moms and youth. Guests: Allison Volkmann, Project Director for the Doctors for America Gun Violence Prevention Initiative; Anneliese Dickman, Milwaukee Program Manager for the Brady Campaign’s…
 
Many social movements—including civil rights, women's rights, gay rights, and environmental protection—have their origins in the 1960s. In the aftermath of the assassinations of JFK, RFK, and MLK, the NRA joined the American Culture Wars and became the militant gun-rights advocacy organization we know today. But there hasn't been an analogous gun v…
 
Switzerland has one of the highest gun ownership rates in the world. The United States is the only other developed country with more guns per capita than Switzerland. And yet, Switzerland has one of the world's lowest crime and gun homicide rates in the world. Is there a way to have a strong gun culture without gun violence? Guests: Nora Markwalder…
 
Americans have the right to own guns. But what responsibilities do gun owners have? to themselves? their families? and their communities? Guests: Tony Gomez, Manager of Seattle & King County's Violence and Injury Prevention Unit; Cassandra Crifasi, Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Deputy Director of the Ce…
 
Gun owners, their kids, and their families and friends are dying from gun-related suicides. By the numbers, this is the biggest gun violence problem we've got. We live in two very different worlds when it comes to guns in the U.S. The people for whom their only experience of guns is as a problem… and the people for whom guns will never be a problem…
 
Seventeen states and DC have red flag laws, aka Extreme Risk Protection Orders. But it's not enough to pass a law. That's just the beginning of the work that needs to be done. Guests: Tami Tunnell and Peter Contos, Illinois Coalition Against Handgun Violence; Shannon Frattaroli, Associate Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; …
 
Extreme risk protection orders, aka red flag laws, have been passed in 17 states and DC, and now Congress is considering a federal red flag law. But how do Extreme Risk Protection Orders work? And do they save lives? Guests: Jeffrey Swanson, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Duke University School of Medicine; Amy Barnhorst, Vi…
 
Saying mass shooters are “evil” is overly simplistic and doesn’t do much to prevent them from killing. But understanding what they have in common, like suicidality, may help us intervene before it’s too late. Guests: Sue Klebold, the mother of one of the Columbine shooters, a suicide prevention activist, author of A Mother's Reckoning: Living in th…
 
People die by suicide when they think they’re a burden on others, when they’re socially isolated, and when they have the ability to injure themselves lethally. Dying by suicide is really hard to do. It's not an impulsive act. You need to have the knowledge and means to act on your feelings – with lethality. Guests: Thomas Joiner, Professor of Psych…
 
With almost 400 million guns in the U.S., law enforcement officers have good reason to fear for their lives. Every civilian they encounter in the line of duty could be armed and dangerous. Guests: Mark Jones, retired ATF agent and Senior Policy Advisor to the Illinois Council Against Handgun Violence; Franklin Zimring, Professor of Law at the Unive…
 
Have we entered the era of Minority Report and “true crime”? Yes… and no. Artificial intelligence, machine learning, facial recognition, and IPOs are very much part of the story, but so are paper records and microfiche. American law enforcement straddles the digital age… and the stone age. Guests: Paul Neudigate, Assistant Police Chief, Cincinnati …
 
Cops are supposed to enforce laws, reduce crime, and make communities safer. But what happens when cops don’t make people feel safe? When people don’t trust the police? When cynicism about the legal system sets in? And when, as in the case of the Baltimore Gun Trace Task Force, the cops are criminals? Guests: Daniel Webster, Professor at the Johns …
 
We typically think of policing as something that’s done by police officers. But what if the most important policing… is self-policing... by individuals and communities? Guests: Sirena Cotton, Founder of Roc the Peace in Rochester; Harold Pollack, Professor at the University of Chicago, and Co-Director of the Crime Lab and Health Lab; Patrick Sharke…
 
Up until recently, Oakland and New Orleans shared something in common: they had some of the highest murder rates in the country. They implemented some of the same strategies focused on high-risk individuals, but gun shootings and homicides dipped in one city, but in the other, not. Why the difference? Guests: Vaughn Crandall, Co-Director of the Cal…
 
Urban gun violence is driven by small groups of high-risk individuals—what some of us call "gangs." They're high-risk for perpetrating violence and for being shot and killed. Guests: David M. Kennedy, Professor of Criminal Justice and Director of the National Network for Safe Communities at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, and author of Don't …
 
How are guns transmitted from person-to-person? How do they make their way from legal sources into the hands of criminals, and how we can block that transmission? Guests: Sheriff Lonny Pulkrabek, Johnson County, Iowa; Daniel Webster, Professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Director of the Center for Gun Policy and Research…
 
Gun violence isn’t random. Both guns and violence spread like infectious diseases through social networks—in the real world and online. Understanding how gun violence spreads can help us control the contagion. Guests: Gary Slutkin, Founder of Cure Violence, Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Illinois-Chicago, and TEDMED 2013 speaker; An…
 
Australia shares a similar history and culture to our own. But yet after the Port Arthur massacre in 1996, Australians came to see the need for gun regulation very differently. Australia’s newly elected conservative prime minister at the time passed sweeping gun reform. How did that real-world experiment play out? What happens when you reduce the n…
 
In the late 1950s, England and Wales switched from coal-based gas to natural gas in their ovens, which was a lot less toxic. Suicide rates dropped dramatically. This has a lot to teach us about gun violence. Instrumentality refers to how good a weapon is as an instrument of killing. Gas was cheap, available and lethal — as are guns in the U.S. toda…
 
The majority of Americans with guns own them for self-defense. But how common is defensive gun use? And what do these self-defense incidents look like? Guests: David Hemenway, Professor of Health Policy and Director of the Harvard Injury Control Research Center, and the author of Private Guns, Public Health; Sara Solnick, Chair of Economics at the …
 
Since the late 1990s, two economists have dueled over whether more guns lead to more or less crime. In this episode, you’ll hear from both and learn whose science prevails. Guests: John Donohue III, economist, Professor of Law at Stanford University, and research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research; and John Lott, economist, Presi…
 
How do you walk that fine line of being black and carrying a gun? with law enforcement? and the public at large? Can it be done? Guests: Justin McFarlin, U.S. Army veteran, and founding member of Everytown USA’s Veterans Advisory Council; Maj Toure, Founder of Black Guns Matter; and Jennifer Carlson, Assistant Professor of Sociology at the Universi…
 
The Civil Rights Movement is famous for its nonviolent tactics, but was it really nonviolent? What role did guns play? Can you have a nonviolent movement and still be armed? Guests: Charles E. Cobb, journalist, author of “This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed,” and former activist with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; and Akinyele U…
 
The black tradition of gun ownership is as long as our nation's history. But Blacks' rights to carry guns have been challenged at every turn. What's that history? And how did it inform attitudes among Civil Rights leaders and beyond? Guests: Nicholas Johnson, Professor of Law, Fordham University; Lisa Lindquist-Dorr, Associate Professor and Associa…
 
What does it mean to be a “good guy with a gun” versus a “bad guy with a gun,” and how can you tell them apart? Who are the “sheep,” the “sheepdogs,” and the “wolves”? What does it mean to be law-abiding or not? And how much is the desire to own a gun about self-defense versus identity? Guests: Alexandra Filindra, Associate Professor of Political S…
 
Happy New Year! Here’s a post-holiday bonus episode before we get back to our regularly scheduled programming next week. In December 2018, I gave a keynote address at the Institute for Health Improvement’s annual meeting in Orlando, Florida. I talked about the importance of storytelling in medicine… why health care providers need to share their per…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login