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CancerCast

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CancerCast

Weill Cornell Medicine

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New scientific developments are transforming the future of cancer treatment and care. Hosted by world-renowned hematologist and medical oncologist Dr. John Leonard, CancerCast is your window into research breakthroughs, innovative therapies and honest accounts of living with and beyond cancer. Questions or suggestions? Email us at cancercast@med.cornell.edu.
 
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Odd Time

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Odd Time

Charles Cornell

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Odd Time is a group podcast among an unlikely cast of characters hosted by YouTuber Charles Cornell and featuring conversations about anything and everything from music and YouTube to disturbing missed connections dug up from the depths of Craigslist. Frequently featuring an array of co-hosts including ultra-productive YouTuber Thomas Frank, 350lb monster Realtor Vinny Pallone, music and fashion extraordinaire Amrom Svay and many other regular guests.
 
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Back to Health

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Back to Health

Weill Cornell Medicine

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Back To Health is your source for the latest in health, wellness and medical care for the whole family. Our team of world-renowned physicians at Weill Cornell Medicine, are having in-depth conversations covering trending health topics, wellness tips and medical breakthroughs here on Back to Health. We understand that medicine is complex and can be overwhelming, that’s why we’ve developed this podcast as a resource for you, your loved ones and our community. We believe that knowledge is empow ...
 
Going Out With Jake Cornell is a podcast about dining, nightlife, dancing, drinks and everything else that falls under the umbrella of “going out.” Here, comedian and former NYC hospitality pro Jake Cornell chats with celebs, comedians, restaurant owners and more about their perfect nights out. Tune in for restaurant recommendations, tips for making the most of nights out, and lots of laughs. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
DairyVoice is a podcast, with new episodes available twice a month. The series has an exclusive focus on dairy producers and associated industry professionals that need help with cost-savings, efficiency, and other invaluable industry information. The podcast series, features expert speakers from across the United States on topics such as Cow Comfort, Business Management, dairy cash flow, and other current industry issues that arise.
 
Fresh from the Hill: Inside Stories of Noteworthy Cornellians will give you an inside look into the lives of some of our most notable young Cornellians. Learn who they are and what role Cornell University played in their professional and personal lives. Communicator Award of Excellence winner 2020. Created and produced by Amanda Massa. Music by Kia Albertson-Rogers '13. Artwork by Chris Kelly.
 
Features conversations with people who offer pieces of the puzzle of “a world that just might work” -- provocative approaches to business, environment, health, science, politics, media and culture. Guests have included Michael Lewis, Ken Burns, Arianna Huffington, Paul Krugman, Temple Grandin, Bill Maher, Cornel West, Doris Kearns Goodwin, and Norman Lear. [http://terrencemcnally.net]
 
Join Toral Patel from the Department of Inclusion and Belonging as she dives into discussions on topics related to diversity and inclusion in the workplace. She will interview colleagues throughout Cornell who are working to build spaces of belonging for all Cornell employees and provide information on how you can begin building these spaces today.
 
Vox Conversations brings you discussions between the brightest minds and the deepest thinkers; conversations that will cause you to question old assumptions and think about the world and our role in it in a new light. Join Sean Illing and his colleagues across the Vox newsroom for new episodes every Monday and Thursday.
 
The Build On Beauty Podcast covers topics ranging from physical health and spiritual enlightenment to social, relational, and entrepreneurial subject matters. Our goal is to ensure that your life is not fragmented by the frailty of aesthetics but fortified with the wisdom, knowledge, and information that builds secure foundations upon which greatness stands. Our host, radio personality, and beauty industry veteran, Cornell Jermaine, will engage skillfully with our guests to bring our listene ...
 
What do two people named Emily have in common other than a name? A love of sports, wine, and talking about both. With backgrounds working in the sports industry, they’re here to give you all of their thoughts from the field to Twitter, and everything in between; dating, pop culture, and wine recommendations.
 
“The Good Ol’ Grateful Deadcast,” the official Grateful Dead podcast, is a series devoted to exploring the music and mythology behind one of the most enduring, progressive, and influential bands in the history of recorded music. The podcast’s tagline is “For The Committed And The Curious,” as episodes will invite new fans to explore the band’s enormous mythology in digestible chunks and enlighten life-long Dead Heads about corners of the band’s history they never knew existed. No topic will ...
 
As we navigate the balance between hope and uncertainty, we invite you to join Dr. Cornel West & Professor Tricia Rose on The Tight Rope, a weekly program where we welcome listeners and guests as thought collaborators. The Tight Rope is rich in creative, unfiltered dialogue on topics ranging from culture, art, and music to the contours of systemic racism, philosophy, the power of Socratic self-examination, and the possibilities of a peaceful and just world. Our innovative and interactive for ...
 
Health Conscious is an independent project produced by students at Cornell University’s Sloan Program in Health Administration. We created the show with the intention of informing students as well as the wider public about important topics in health care. We aim to bring insights from renowned health leaders to curious minds everywhere. New episodes will be released just about every other week, so subscribe now for more Health Conscious.
 
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Tyme

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Tyme

Cornell Timmons

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This is a random channel where anything can qhappen.Topics may change and differ but I'll try to keep all topics in order and some what informal and entertaining. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tyme/support
 
Good Code is a weekly podcast on ethics in our digital world. We look at ways in which our increasingly digital societies could go terribly wrong, and we speak with those trying to prevent that. If you like TV shows, think of it as Black Mirror meets The Good Place: Dystopian scenarios, with a way out. Good Code is a collaboration of Cornell Tech's Digital Life Initiative and visiting journalist Chine Labbe.
 
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Vanessa Walker's Principles in Power: Latin America and the Politics of U. S. Human Rights Diplomacy (Cornell University Press, 2020) explores the relationship between policy makers and nongovernment advocates in Latin America and the United States government in order to explain the rise of anti-interventionist human rights policies uniquely critic…
 
Transcript here: https://otter.ai/u/M3TkiRTh1MaYHgLdLQGE4a4X2TIBook info here: https://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/9781501764417/ploughshares-and-swords/#bookTabs=1This episode, we speak with Jayita Sarkar, author of the new paperback and open access ebook Ploughshares and Swords: India’s Nuclear Program in the Global Cold War. Jay Sarkar is …
 
Singing Like Germans: Black Musicians in the Land of Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms by Kira Thurman (Cornell University Press, 2021) is a truly interdisciplinary study. Dr. Thurman’s work sits at the intersection of German Studies, History, and Musicology. Beginning in the 1870s with concerts given by the Fisk Jubilee Singers, Singing Like Germans cov…
 
The 11th episode of a podcast hosted by Entrepreneurship at Cornell, Startup Cornell, features Stephanie Wisner ’16, co-founder of Centivax, a therapeutics company that’s creating universal vaccines to reduce and eradicate the remaining complex pathogens of the 21st century. She is also the author of a newly-released book, “Building Backwards to Bi…
 
1973 looms large as we live out the 50th anniversary of the Watergate Hearings and Roe v Wade. Let’s look at the fears and forces in response to ‘60s changes that fueled the long Christo-Authoritarian march to a Supreme Court forcing minority rule on America. In my recent conversation with KEVIN BOYLE about his book THE SHATTERING: America in the ‘…
 
Welcome to News from the Castle. Our hosts Dempsey, Amber, and Jordan go through this week's biggest news! Listen to us talk about John Williams' retirement, Marvel’s releases at Comic Con, News on Agatha: House of Harkness and Kraven the Hunter, What is happening with the Lion King Prequel, 20th Century's Barbarian, and what in the Santaverse is g…
 
Daniel Silva’s Embodying Modernity: Global Fitness Culture and Building the Brazilian Body (U Pittsburgh Press, 2022) examines the current boom of fitness culture in Brazil in the context of the white patriarchal notions of race, gender, and sexuality through which fitness practice, commodities, and cultural products traffic. The book traces the im…
 
In Bedlam in the New World: A Mexican Madhouse in the Age of Enlightenment (UNC Press, 2022), Cristina Ramos tells us the story of Mexico city’s oldest public institution for the insane, the Hospital de San Hipólito. This institution, founded in 1567, was the first mental hospital in the New World. Remarkable as this fact may be, this book is not s…
 
Vanessa Walker's Principles in Power: Latin America and the Politics of U. S. Human Rights Diplomacy (Cornell University Press, 2020) explores the relationship between policy makers and nongovernment advocates in Latin America and the United States government in order to explain the rise of anti-interventionist human rights policies uniquely critic…
 
The Hygienic Apparatus: Weimar Cinema and Environmental Disorder (Northwestern UP, 2022) traces how the environmental effects of industrialization reverberated through the cinema of Germany’s Weimar Republic. In the early twentieth century, hygiene encompassed the myriad attempts to create healthy spaces for life and work amid the pollution, diseas…
 
The Unfinished History of the Iran-Iraq War: Faith, Firepower, and Iran’s Revolutionary Guards (Cambridge UP, 2021) represents a fascinating and carefully documented intellectual history of how Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps document, remember, and contest the Iran-Iraq War and of its ramifications for the religious, cultural, and politi…
 
With I Am Jugoslovenka!: Feminist Performance Politics During and After Yugoslav Socialism (Manchester UP, 2022), Jasmina Tumbas examines forms of feminist political and artistic engagement in Yugoslavia and its successor nations. By bringing together a wide range of materials—from performance and conceptual art, video works, film and pop music, le…
 
In Bedlam in the New World: A Mexican Madhouse in the Age of Enlightenment (UNC Press, 2022), Cristina Ramos tells us the story of Mexico city’s oldest public institution for the insane, the Hospital de San Hipólito. This institution, founded in 1567, was the first mental hospital in the New World. Remarkable as this fact may be, this book is not s…
 
The Hygienic Apparatus: Weimar Cinema and Environmental Disorder (Northwestern UP, 2022) traces how the environmental effects of industrialization reverberated through the cinema of Germany’s Weimar Republic. In the early twentieth century, hygiene encompassed the myriad attempts to create healthy spaces for life and work amid the pollution, diseas…
 
They call her Doc and she sold with 40 pregnancies for a record price of $1,925,000. She’s S-S-I Doc Have Not 8784-ET (EX-94, EX-96-MS at 4y5m). From the heart of the Dellia family by Woodcrest King Doc, she’s got big number offspring and show winning type. In this episode, the sale co-manager and buying partner Tim Abbott talks with Joel Hastings …
 
Vox's Constance Grady talks with writer Jonathan Lethem about his 2003 work The Fortress of Solitude in this recording from a live Vox Book Club event. They discuss the prescient and still-relevant themes of the novel — like the issues of appropriation in art, gentrification, and superheroes, how Lethem approaches "realism" in his writing, and the …
 
In Brecht and the Bible: A Study of Religious Nihilism and Human Weakness in Brecht's Drama of Morality and the City (UNC Press, 2020), Father G. Ronald Murphy argues that Brecht, atheist and Marxist though he was, was also a sensitive reader and interpreter of the Bible. Murphy persuasively shows that Brecht's use of Biblical texts was not only sa…
 
This podcast is a recorded panel discussion on “War and Peace: America's Humane War and the Crisis in Ukraine.” The panel was part of the Annual Conference of the Connecticut/Baden-Württemberg Human Rights Research Consortium (HRRC) held on May 12, 2022 at the University of Connecticut in Hartford. The discussion considers the recent book Humane: H…
 
James Stafford teaches at Columbia University, where he specializes in the political and intellectual history of Ireland, Britain and Western Europe since 1750, with a particular interest in questions of political economy and international order. In this interview he discusses his new book The Case of Ireland: Commerce, Empire and the European Orde…
 
Open Hearts, Closed Doors: Immigration Reform and the Waning of Mainline Protestantism (NYU Press, 2021) uncovers the largely overlooked role that liberal Protestants played in fostering cultural diversity in America and pushing for new immigration laws during the forty years following the passage of the restrictive Immigration Act of 1924. These e…
 
Dr. Brett Malcolm Grainger is a scholar of American religion and an award-winning journalist. He is Assistant Professor of Theology and Religious Studies at Villanova University and the author of Church In The Wild: Evangelicals In Antebellum American and In The World but Not of It: One Family's Militant Faith and the History of Fundamentalism in A…
 
In Subversive Habits: Black Catholic Nuns in the Long African American Freedom Struggle (Duke UP, 2022), Shannen Dee Williams provides the first full history of Black Catholic nuns in the United States, hailing them as the forgotten prophets of Catholicism and democracy. Drawing on oral histories and previously sealed Church records, Williams demon…
 
Dana Lerner '14 is currently the co-producer of the revival of COMPANY. COMPANY was recently nominated for nine Tony Awards and won five, including best revival of a musical. As a producer, Dana was nominated and won best revival of a musical. Revisit this episode from 2019 to get an exclusive look behind the scenes of Broadway. ___________________…
 
From grasshoppers to grubs, an eye-opening look at insect cuisine around the world. An estimated two billion people worldwide regularly consume insects, yet bugs are rarely eaten in the West. Why are some disgusted at the thought of eating insects while others find them delicious? Edible Insects: A Global History (Reaktion Books, 2021) provides a b…
 
The Families' Civil War: Black Soldiers and the Fight for Racial Justice (U Georgia Press, 2022) tells the stories of freeborn northern African Americans in Philadelphia struggling to maintain families while fighting against racial discrimination. Taking a long view, from 1850 to the 1920s, Holly A. Pinheiro Jr. shows how Civil War military service…
 
The economist and historian Deirdre Nansen McCloskey has been best known recently for her Bourgeois Era trilogy, a vigorous defense, unrivaled in scope, of commercially tested betterment. Its massive volumes, The Bourgeois Virtues, Bourgeois Dignity, and Bourgeois Equality, solve Adam Smith's puzzle of the nature and causes of the wealth of nations…
 
Beginning in 1955, West Germany recruited millions of people as guest workers from Yugoslavia, Italy, Greece, Spain, Portugal, and especially Turkey. This labor force was essential to creating the postwar German economic miracle. Employers fantasized that foreign "guest workers" would provide labor power in their prime productive years without havi…
 
Beginning in 1955, West Germany recruited millions of people as guest workers from Yugoslavia, Italy, Greece, Spain, Portugal, and especially Turkey. This labor force was essential to creating the postwar German economic miracle. Employers fantasized that foreign "guest workers" would provide labor power in their prime productive years without havi…
 
Half a century after the Holocaust, on European soil, Bosnian Serbs orchestrated a system of concentration camps where they subjected their Bosniak Muslim and Bosnian Croat neighbors to torture, abuse, and killing. Foreign journalists exposed the horrors of the camps in the summer of 1992, sparking worldwide outrage. This exposure, however, did not…
 
Victor Seow’s Carbon Technocracy: Energy regimes in Modern East Asia (U Chicago Press, 2021) is an account of the modern “world that carbon made” through the case study of the Fushun colliery in Manchuria. “Carbon technocracy” is a system dedicated to the optimal exploitation of fossil fuel resources. It is, as Seow shows, a system of consistent wa…
 
In her eighteenth-century medical recipe manuscript, the Philadelphia healer Elizabeth Coates Paschall asserted her ingenuity and authority with the bold strokes of her pen. Paschall developed an extensive healing practice, consulted medical texts, and conducted experiments based on personal observations. As British North America’s premier city of …
 
Ever wonder about the Roman catacombs? Look no further. Today I talked to William "Chip" Gruen of Muhlenberg College about his article "Roman Catacombs" from the collection The Reception of Jesus in the First Three Centuries (2019) from Bloomsbury. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium…
 
Today I talked to Claire Bellerjeau about her book (co-authored with Tiffany Yecke Brooks) Espionage and Enslavement in the Revolution: The True Story of Robert Townsend and Elizabeth (Lyons Press, 2021). In January 1785, a young African American woman named Elizabeth was put on board the Lucretia in New York Harbor, bound for Charleston, where she…
 
Benjamin Franklin grew up in a devout Protestant family with limited prospects for wealth and fame. By hard work, limitless curiosity, native intelligence, and luck (what he called "providence"), Franklin became one of Philadelphia's most prominent leaders, a world recognized scientist, and the United States' leading diplomat during the War for Ind…
 
In The Faddan More Psalter: The Discovery and Conservation of a Medieval Treasure Dr. John Gillis explores the conservation, construction, and context of an early medieval psalter discovered by chance in a bog at Faddan More, Co. Tipperary in July 2006. The different facets of this find are discussed in-depth, along with the pre-existing and newly …
 
Satan's transformation from opaque functionary to chief antagonist is one of the most striking features of the development of Jewish theology in the Second Temple Period and beyond. Once no more than an "accuser" testing members of the human community, Satan, along with his demons, is presented by Jewish apocalyptic texts and the New Testament as a…
 
In 1885 Jane and Leland Stanford cofounded a university to honor their recently deceased young son. After her husband’s death in 1893, Jane Stanford, a devoted spiritualist who expected the university to inculcate her values, steered Stanford into eccentricity and public controversy for more than a decade. In 1905 she was murdered in Hawaii, a vict…
 
How much does the average person know about Alexander Hamilton (1755 or 1757 – 1804)? Would we have guessed that this hero of many fiscal conservatives wrote, “A national debt, if it is not excessive will be to us a national blessing; it will be a powerful cement of our union…?” Most of us know that he was killed by his political enemy Aaron Burr i…
 
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Shanghai became a cosmopolitan hub with communities of Japanese, British, Russians, Jews, and others including Indians – most of whom were Sikhs. The story of Indians in Shanghai has however been largely elided. From Policemen to Revolutionaries: A Sikh Diaspora in Global Shanghai, 1885-1945 (Br…
 
Seán William Gannon's book The Irish Imperial Service: Policing Palestine and Administering the Empire, 1922–1966 (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) explores Irish participation in the British imperial project after ‘Southern’ Ireland’s independence in 1922. Building on a detailed study of the Irish contribution to the policing of the Palestine Mandate, it…
 
Today we're joined by David DeJesus, multi instrumentalist and newly appointed Director of Jazz Studies at Purchase College! We talk all things Jazz Studies, as well as the shocking lack of music instruction in schools these days. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-…
 
Sean Illing talks with author Ryan Holiday about Stoicism — a philosophy with roots in ancient Greece and which flourished in early imperial Rome — and how it can help us live fulfilling lives today. In addition to explaining what Stoicism is and how we can practice it, Holiday addresses the critical idea that Stoicism is a philosophy for elites, u…
 
In Proscribing Peace: How Listing Armed Groups as Terrorists Hurts Negotiations (Manchester UP, 2021), Dr. Sophie Haspeslagh offers a systematic examination of the impact of proscription on peace negotiations. With rare access to actors during the Colombian negotiations with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia People's Army (FARC), Dr. Haspe…
 
Today’s guests are Meredith Farmer and Jonathan D.S. Schroeder, the co-editors of a bracing new collection of essays about the figure of Ahab in Melville’s novel Moby-Dick. Meredith is the Assistant Teaching Professor of Core Literature at Wake Forest University. Her book Melville’s Leaks: Science, Materialism, and the Reconstitution of Persons is …
 
In this episode of New Books in Literary Studies, John Yargo spoke with Mahshid Mayar about how children’s puzzles and schoolbooks at the turn of the 20th century helped shape U.S. political relations with the world. Professor Mayar is an assistant professor of American Studies at Bielefeld University and research associate at the English Departmen…
 
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