show episodes
 
Tom Wilmer’s six-time Lowell Thomas award-winning podcast — recorded live on location across America and around the world — showcases the arts, culture, music, nature, history, science, wine and spirits, brewpubs, the culinary arts and more. He covers nouns and verbs: people, places, things, and action — everything from baseball to exploring South Pacific atolls, and interviewing the "real" Santa Claus in the Arctic. Tom's feature, recorded live at Harland & Wolfe Shipyards in Belfast Northe ...
 
Our mission is to educate people about America's industrial history and to encourage and inspire future innovation. We do this by creating engaging experiences that highlight the many fascinating technical and business innovations that have taken place in this region and continue to change the world. Located in the Francis Cabot Lowell Mill, an icon of the American Industrial Revolution, the Museum brings together intriguing artifacts, cultural insights, and inspiring stories to delight peop ...
 
The purpose of this book "is to tell in simple fashion the story of some Americans who showed that they knew how to live and how to die; who proved their truth by their endeavor; and who joined to the stern and manly qualities which are essential to the well-being of a masterful race the virtues of gentleness, of patriotism, and of lofty adherence to an ideal." (from the Introduction)
 
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show series
 
Brenda Lacombe was a fun loving, teenager, who just had a baby. She fell in love with her baby and was aiming to make herself into a great mother. She'd never get the chance. Brenda left her grandmother's apartment just before 1:00am on a Sunday-Monday morning in 1982. She is reported to have made and or received some phone calls from the apartment…
 
Atheism in Five Minutes, by Professor Teemu Taira, is part of Equinox Publishing’s “Religion in 5 Minutes” series. It offers insights into a number of commonly held questions about the ideas, practices, and attitudes concerning atheism and atheists. The volume highlights approaches based on the study of religion, sociology, history, anthropology, p…
 
In this episode, I am joined by the poet and critic Dana Gioia to discuss Charles Baudelaire's famous book of poems, Les Fleurs du Mal, or The Flowers of Evil. We tackle some big questions in this episode, such as whether and how evil can be beautiful, the nature of Catholic art and poetry, original sin, and the poet as a damned figure.I hope you e…
 
Through extensive use of primary resources and fieldwork, Karli Shimizu's book Overseas Shinto Shrines: Religion, Secularity and the Japanese Empire (Bloomsbury, 2022) examines overseas Shinto shrines and their complex role in the colonization and modernization of newly Japanese lands and subjects. Shinto shrines became one of the most visible symb…
 
Thomas Mortimer was a sales professional, his wife Laura was an economist in Boston. Money should not have been an issue, however Thomas was laid off and had been out of work for 18 months. Thomas and his wife lived with Laura's mother Ragna and the couple's two beautiful children in Winchester, Ma. Thomas had just found another executive level sal…
 
Given the popularity and success of the Hindu-Right in India’s electoral politics today, how may one study ostensibly ‘Western’ concepts and ideas, such as the secular and its family of cognates, like secularism, secularisation and secularity in non-Western societies without assuming them simply as derivative, or colonial legacies or contrast cases…
 
Station Nightclub Fire 2003-Scott James wrote the definitive book on the Station Nightclub Fire, in West Warwick, Rhode Island. The book "Trial By Fire" takes the reader by the lapels and propels them trough the actual fire and the grisly aftermath. The author also sheds light on some inaccurate local reporting and political maneuvering, that was u…
 
Amanda Furiasse received her PhD in Religion and Graduate Certificate in Museum Studies from Florida State University in 2018. Her research unfolds at the convergence of religion, health, and technology and explores how African communities use religious ritual as a mechanism to heal from violence and trauma. She is Co-Founder and Curator at the Rel…
 
Ruth Terry was named as the Lady of the Dunes in Provincetown, Massachusetts. The horrifying and mutilated remains were discovered by a teenage girl on Race Point beach in July 1974. She went unnamed for forty-eight years. Ruth Terry apparently had several aliases, as did her husband Guy Rockwell Muldavin. He never reported her missing and he was s…
 
The issue of how science and religion relate to one another has been a major controversy of our age. It helped fuel the rise of the New Atheist movement in the early 21st century for example. It has also been a major area of contention within the growing field known as "Big History" that seeks the scientific study of the history of the entire unive…
 
Claus was never a warm and cuddly person, however his indifference to his wife's first insulin overdose and his open affair around Newport, raised suspicions, when Sunny suffered an almost identical overdose a year later. Sunny's biological son Alex, contacted a lawyer-Investigator, they discovered a black bag containing insulin vials and barbitura…
 
In this episode, I am joined by Christopher Snyder, professor of history and director of British Studies at Mississippi State University, to discuss J.R.R. Tolkien's fiction and virtue ethics. We discuss Tolkien's background , training, academic work and influences, how to think about his fiction and its enduring value, and what role virtue plays i…
 
Before the OJ Simpson trial, the Claus Von Bulow case was the trial of the century. It was the first nationally televised criminal trial. This case has it all wealth, sex and murder. This case provides a peek into the secretive lives of socialites. Sunny Von Bulow inherited over 200 million dollars at age three. She was a constant on the Manhattan …
 
In 2003 women started disappearing in hardscrabble Woonsocket, Rhode Island. A mild mannered warehouse worker. The police were eventually tipped off by an anonymous caller, who's stated that the police needed to speak with the victim of a near fatal assault. The victim pointed them to a local man with no police record and appeared to be an upstandi…
 
Charles Ponzi was always one to take a short cut. Mr Ponzi hoodwinked his way to a Bank manager position in Montreal, he saw that the bank president was using new investment money to fund payments coming due. The problem was that the investors would take the money and run, not reinvest. Ponzi saw the flaw in this game and the bank soon collapsed. A…
 
In this episode, I team up again with Karen Swallow Prior, this time to discuss what many people call "the great American novel" Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter. We talk about sin, guilt, and repression, and how Hawthorne's story is more complicated and interesting than most people make it out to be.As always, I hope you enjoy our conversa…
 
rom the perspective of Protestant America, nineteenth-century Mormons were the victims of a peculiar zealotry, a population deranged––socially, sexually, even racially––by the extravagances of belief they called “religion.” Make Yourselves Gods: Mormons and the Unfinished Business of American Secularism (U Chicago Press, 2019), by Dr. Peter Coviell…
 
What caused a loving father and husband to violate the sacred trust given to a father and husband? That remains a true mystery, but Kenneth Seguin's actions are well documented. He had previously suffered through some depression and was fully assisted by his wife Maryann. The details surrounding this triple homicide are hard to fathom. Kenneth drug…
 
For much of America’s rapidly growing secular population, religion is an inescapable source of skepticism and discomfort. It shows up in politics and in holidays, but also in common events like weddings and funerals. In The Secular Paradox: On the Religiosity of the Not Religious (NYU Press, 2022), Joseph Blankholm argues that, despite their desire…
 
In 1997 Sal Sicari lead his fellow pedophile Charles Jaynes to his neighbor in East Cambridge, Ma, ten year old Jeffery Curley. When Jeffery resisted their sexual advances, Jaynes placed a gas soaked rag over the child's mouth and used his obese body to suffocate Jeffery. The duo sexually defiled the boy's body and later dumped the body in coastal …
 
In this episode, I speak with the poet, critic, and biographer Paul Mariani, professor emeritus at Boston College. We discuss his new book, All that Will be New and his biography of Robert Lowell, The Lost Puritan. We discuss Lowell's life, poetry, and his struggle with the permanent things: religion, marriage, art, family. Given the influence of H…
 
Assistant Attorney General Paul McLaughlin was a dedicated prosecutor who believed that he could help urban communities, through removing career criminals from the city's streets. Paul was ramping up a trial for a violent carjacking, where there was significant witness intimidation. Unbeknownst to Paul, a local gangbanger was stocking him, he had a…
 
In Positive Atheism: Bayle, Meslier, d’Holbach, Diderot (Edinburgh University Press, 2021), Dr. Charles Devellennes looks at the religious, social, and political thought of the first four thinkers of the French Enlightenment: Pierre Bayle, Jean Meslier, Paul-Henri Thiry d’Holbach and Denis Diderot to explicitly argue for atheism as a positive philo…
 
Melanie was a typical high school freshman in 1989, she was looking forward to getting her braces off and whatever else life promised. She had an older boyfriend and this was a secret, because the older teen had a girlfriend. Melanie was invited to a late night party in the woods at a remote site where kids were known to gather. The police have see…
 
In this episode, I speak with my friends, Fr. Thomas Joseph White, OP and Fr. Jonah Teller, OP about the relationship between art, truth, and beauty, sacred and profane music, how music might be integral to religious life, and whether the banjo is beautiful. Long time listeners will remember Thomas Joseph from our very first episode on Flannery O'C…
 
The FBI knew they had to record Gerry Angiulo and his brothers discussing mafia business in order to prove a RICO case. The north-end mob was bringing in $45,000 a week in gambling alone, the downfall was, from all the big mouths in the executive suite on Prince Street. The tapes were pure gold for the FBI and the media. As soon as the handcuffs we…
 
Gerry brought hundreds of millions into the Mafia's coffers, this kept him safe, but Gerry's mouth almost got him killed…more than once. New England Godfather, Raymond Patriarca had to mediate on Gerry's behalf. Hitman Joe Barboza almost cost Gerry his freedom in a corrupt FBI investigation, but after that Gerry ushered in the most profitable perio…
 
Gerry Angiulo and his brothers ruled the Boston mafia for generations. He was often stereotypical, He was loud and obnoxious, he was often cruel to the people who committed crimes for the family, calling them suckers. Gerry's big mouth was his Achilles heal and the FBI knew it. They installed an illegal wiretap at one of his bar's in the combat zon…
 
Jassy was escaping a cycle of domestic violence, but she was now free of her tormentor. She went out to a Boston Nightclub and fought with friends. Jassy was celebrating and appeared intoxicated. She tried to get into someone else's Uber. A "gentleman" was willing to drive her home and out of the freezing February night. Louis Coleman III is curren…
 
Brianna craved independence and she was on her way to life goals she had set. She appeared to fall into a tough crowd that was involved in hard drugs. Some poor decisions led to some teenage strife. She departed her job late at night and her car was found the next day at an old landmark in the area. The police seemingly could not ascertain that her…
 
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