show episodes
 
The American Enterprise Institute’s Danielle Pletka and Marc Thiessen address the questions we’re all asking in their podcast, “What the Hell Is Going On?” In conversational, informative and irreverent episodes, Pletka and Thiessen interview policymakers and experts, asking tough, probing questions about the most important foreign policy and security challenges facing the world today.
 
Whether you are working hard or hardly working, join AEI Resident Fellow Brent Orrell as he explores national trends and public policies affecting the vitality of the American workforce and how to prepare yourself for success in our rapidly-changing economy. And whatever else happens, we promise it will take your mind off of your job.
 
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Are You Kidding Me?

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Are You Kidding Me?

American Enterprise Institute

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Sometimes the very strategies meant to help children have the opposite effect. Join AEI’s Naomi Schaefer Riley and Ian Rowe as they look behind the headlines at the public policies and cultural agendas driving child welfare and education. Rowe and Riley bring to light practices that will make you ask, “Are you kidding me?”
 
Hosts Daniel Wiser, Jr., and Daniel Kane sit down with the authors of National Affairs essays to discuss pivotal issues — from domestic-policy debates to enduring dilemmas of society and culture — that are often overlooked by American media. Each episode promises a fresh view on contemporary and permanent questions across a wide range of topics, all with one central theme: to help you think a little more clearly.
 
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Explain to Shane

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Explain to Shane

American Enterprise Institute

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Technology has become increasingly important to policy debates, but these debates won’t be productive without an understanding of how the technology in question works. AEI Visiting Fellow Shane Tews interviews tech industry experts to explain how the apps, services, and structures of today’s information technology systems work, and how they shape our social and economic life.
 
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The Campus Exchange

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The Campus Exchange

The American Enterprise Institute

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The Campus Exchange is AEI’s podcast for college students who are seeking to improve the quality and diversity of public policy dialogue on campus. Every two weeks, The Campus Exchange features recordings from live events with AEI scholars on topics ranging from economics, foreign policy, domestic policy, and society and culture. These conversations are organized for and moderated by members of AEI’s Executive Council Program, which connects top undergraduates across the country with the ide ...
 
Elisabeth Braw, scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, presents 'On the Cusp' which focuses on how governments, business and civil society can work together to strengthen countries' defence against existing and emerging threats. Each episode she interviews a guest who is a leader in their respective field.
 
Dig into the art of disagreement and the power of love with social scientist Arthur Brooks. Against the backdrop of a toxic political climate engendered by the 2016 presidential election, season one focuses on the ways we can better disagree with our friends, family, and community. The second season focuses on love: what it means to find meaning in our work, loving our country, and how to love our enemies. Produced by the Vox Media Podcast Network.
 
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show series
 
Housing policy in America is inextricably linked with employment opportunities, small business ventures, education access, and a host of other issues that directly impact economic opportunity. Understanding the history of low income housing in America is key to understanding and reimagining housing policy today. On this episode of Hardly Working, I…
 
This week, the AEI Podcast Channel presents the latest Kitchen Sync Conversation. David E. Sanger is a White House and national security correspondent, and a senior writer. In a 38-year reporting career for The New York Times, he has been on three teams that have won Pulitzer Prizes, most recently in 2017 for international reporting. His newest boo…
 
For the past two years, American children have had their lives upended as schools across the country transitioned to remote learning and introduced harsh measures to help curb the spread of COVID-19. As a result, most students have fallen far behind in school, and many children and teenagers are experiencing grave mental health problems. With distr…
 
New discoveries, inventions, and innovations — ideas — are at the heart of scientific progress and economic growth. But that means a growing economy depends on an accelerating production of new ideas. In this week's episode of "Political Economy," I'm joined by Didier Sornette to talk about where these ideas come from, why they've been in decline, …
 
Conservatives have been on the sidelines of climate-policy debates for several decades now. In recent years, however, a new force has appeared in climate politics: the Eco-right. Guests Alex Bozmoski and Nate Hochman join us to discuss the different factions within this movement of scrappy, conservative-leaning non-profits and think tanks, and expl…
 
Description: Young people who graduate from high school, get a job, and get married before they have children are less likely to live in poverty later in life. Given the importance of this information, some have suggested that this ordering of milestones—known as “the success sequence”—be taught in K-12 schools. In this episode, Naomi and Ian are j…
 
This week, the United States will mark one year since the disgraceful and violent Capitol insurrection of January 6, 2020. The culmination of Trump’s ‘Big Lie’ surrounding the 2020 presidential election, last year’s Capitol riots marked a focal point in America’s political polarization and may have brought the country closer to a constitutional cri…
 
Klon Kitchen is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), where he focuses on the intersection of national security and defense technologies and innovation. Through his research, he works to understand and explain how emerging technologies are shaping modern statecraft, intelligence, and warfighting, while focusing on cybersecurit…
 
As today’s supply chain challenges create bottlenecks across the economy, consumers and businesses of all sizes are dealing with unprecedented situations involving lack of component parts, trapped inventory, and delayed deliveries. But what if we could digitize parts of the supply chain and make them more efficient? Where, if at all, can technology…
 
The debate around online content moderation is not slowing down. People remain bitterly divided over whether social media platforms should take down more content, or not moderate at all. But this issue is not limited to the US: Across the world, authoritarian regimes are using online censorship to silence dissenters, and are retaliating against cit…
 
In this episode of Hardly Working, Brent Orrell is joined by AEI nonresident fellow and cultural critic Thomas Chatterton Williams. Williams’s two books Losing My Cool, published in 2010 and Self Portrait in Black and White, published in 2019, tie together personal memoir and philosophy to provide a fresh perspective on America’s history of racial …
 
This week, AEI presents the latest Kitchen Sync Conversation. Yuval Levin is the director of Social, Cultural, and Constitutional Studies at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI). He also holds the Beth and Ravenel Curry Chair in Public Policy. The founding and current editor of National Affairs, he is also a senior editor of The New Atlantis and…
 
Description: In March 2021, the California Department of Education approved the final version of the ethnic Studies Model Curriculum. In October 2021, Governor Gavin Newsom signed Assembly Bill No. 101 into law, making California the first state to require an ethnic studies class for graduation. In this episode, Naomi and Ian are joined by Dr. Weny…
 
While the scientific community has reached a broad consensus about climate change and the warming planet, just how well does the general public understand this consensus? In this week's episode of the podcast, Steven E. Koonin is here to discuss what we know about climate change, what we don't, and how we should respond to the warming planet. Steve…
 
Despite President Biden’s vow to leave no man behind, when the last American plane departed Kabul in August, hundreds of American citizens and thousands of our Afghan allies were left stranded and at the mercy of the Taliban. In the face of government inaction, a group of US veterans formed Project Exodus Relief, a non-partisan volunteer effort ded…
 
What does it mean to be a good citizen? How is American government meant to function? What does the present ideological state of our parties indicate? The American Enterprise Institute’s Dr. Jay Cost is joined by students from the University of Georgia to discuss insights that James Madison, Founding Father and America’s fourth president, can offer…
 
Amidst today’s labor shortage, employers are learning an important truth: we have no “extra” people. Unfortunately, many qualified workers are “hidden” from real consideration for jobs by ineffective artificial intelligence hiring screens, overly strict credentialing requirements, or a narrowmindedness from companies on how seemingly disparate skil…
 
First detected last month in South Africa, the new Omicron strain of the coronavirus has been designated a “variant of concern” by both the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control. Dozens of countries have detected Omicron infections, and in the United States, at least 16 states have reported cases. While scientists are still …
 
When it comes to federal investment in research and development, failures like Solyndra are held up as evidence of wasteful government spending while success stories go largely unnoticed. But what kind of returns do we see on investments in scientific research by government? And should government funding emphasize basic or more practical, applied r…
 
Mark Jamison is a nonresident senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, where he works on how technology affects the economy, and on telecommunications and Federal Communications Commission issues. Dr. Jamison has served on the FCC transition team for President-elect Trump, as a special adviser to the chair of the governor of Florida’s in…
 
The extent to which lawyers, corporate executives, and government officials focus on cybersecurity fluctuates with the threat level posed by malicious cyber actors. In light of numerous ransomware attacks on critical industries, lawmakers are looking at more regulatory obligations to mitigate the risks these threats pose. Companies, meanwhile, are …
 
Cryptocurrencies like bitcoin have few fans in Washington, but thanks to increasing worries over the long-term stability of the dollar, they have piqued the interest of some major investors. In an era of rapid growth in deficits and debt and rising inflation, cryptocurrencies may be pointing us toward a new monetary order. Guest Avik Roy joins us t…
 
NASA last launched astronauts into space with its final Space Shuttle mission in the summer of 2011. But, nine years later, a rocket built by SpaceX lifted off at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and carried two astronauts to the International Space Station. How did this private company, in less than 20 years, go from a fledgling startup to one …
 
On Wednesday, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health, a landmark case centered on a 2018 Mississippi law that bans most abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy. The legal battle is the most consequential test of abortion rights in decades, and the outcome will have direct implications on the fate of the court’s 1973…
 
With automation changing the nature of work before our very eyes, it is more important than ever that we begin to re-think our approach to education, the workforce, and yes, even thinking itself. In this episode of Hardly Working, Brent is joined by journalist and acclaimed science writer Annie Murphy Paul to discuss how we can tap into our bodies,…
 
Description: A student in Boston public schools recently knocked her principal unconscious during school hours. A girl was recently sexually assaulted in a Loudon County, Virginia, school, and administrators falsely denied knowledge of its occurrence. What is causing an increase in school violence and how can administrators use their resources to i…
 
When we think of infrastructure, roads and bridges are among the first things that come to mind. But over the past decade, massive investments in warehouse-scale data centers constitute a new kind of infrastructure build up. And that cloud computing infrastructure might be the beginning of a new economic revolution. My guest today is Mark Mills, an…
 
One of our greatest hits…. Originally broadcast on June 23, 2021. The national conversation about race is making its way through the US education system. Seemingly overnight, debates about whether to teach children critical race theory have taken hold of state legislatures and school board meetings across the country. But what exactly is critical r…
 
When we hear the word “vocation”, many people think vocational training and technical education. But, the word “vocation” has deeper roots in the idea of a calling or an occupation to which a person is especially drawn, suited, trained, or qualified. By no means is this calling obvious, and in fact finding vocation often means a series of unpredict…
 
Critical race theory has transformed from a once-obscure academic concept to an issue at the forefront of America's political discourse. In the wake of Glenn Youngkin's victory in Virginia, many have viewed his opposition to critical race theory and his concerns surrounding the teaching of race in schools as a significant factor in his success in t…
 
De-extincted woolly mammoths, genetically engineered livestock, and transgenic crops: Are biologists opening a Pandora's box that will lead to the further destruction of the natural world? In this episode of "Political Economy," Beth Shapiro joins the podcast to discuss that question, explain the latest discoveries in synthetic biology, and explore…
 
How can children enjoy the groundbreaking innovations of the digital age with sufficient guardrails around their personal data? What existing laws and regulations aim to protect children online, and what steps must businesses of all sizes take to comply with them? On this episode of “Explain to Shane,” Shane sits down with Rick Lane, founder and CE…
 
This week, the AEI Podcast Channel presents a live episode of What the Hell is Going On. You can find the podcast on Apple, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. In the Virginia governor’s race, Republican Glenn Youngkin defeated former Governor Terry McAuliffe in a state that President Biden won by 10 points in 2020. In New Jersey, a state B…
 
For several years, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has been working to modernize the use of key sections of spectrum airwaves — known as C-band — for commercial deployment. Through a series of auctions, the FCC sold the license rights to C-band airwaves to commercial 5G mobile telecommunications providers, unleashing a massive wave of p…
 
Description: The child tax credit (CTC) in the United States has always required its recipients to work. Yet the recent proposal from the Biden administration eliminates the work requirement in the CTC. Ensuring that parents earn a small amount of money benefits kids and helps lift families out of poverty. How can we ensure our policies align with …
 
In the 1960s, President Lyndon B. Johnson began the so-called War on Poverty, expanding the federal government’s role in reducing poverty in the United States. At one level, this effort has been an overwhelming success: consumption poverty (the number of people who cannot afford basic goods and services) has fallen from 30 percent to 3 percent. At …
 
On the heels of a summer of billionaire space flights and William Shatner's recent rocket trip, some Americans are echoing old arguments about the wastefulness of space exploration. Alongside this controversy, massive declines in launch costs and a burgeoning space economy have renewed interest in manned missions to the Moon and Mars. In today's ep…
 
This past August, we learned that China tested a nuclear-capable hypersonic missile that circled the globe before streaking towards its target. This advanced weapons capability surprised many in the US intelligence community and has sparked both questions and concerns surrounding the true extent of China’s military modernization. Thomas Karako join…
 
Oriana Skylar Mastro is a nonresident senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, where she focuses on Chinese military and security policy in the Asia-Pacific and rising power challenges to the international order. She also serves in the United States Air Force Reserve as a strategic planner at US Indo-Pacific Command. Oriana joins Phoebe …
 
The case of Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization — which the Supreme Court will hear this term — offers the cleanest opportunity since 1973 for the Court to revisit its abortion jurisprudence. A review of that jurisprudence shows that, regardless of anyone’s views of abortion itself, basic fidelity to the Constitution and the rule of law de…
 
In this week's Virginia governor's race, Republican Glenn Youngkin defeated former Governor Terry McAuliffe in a state that President Biden won by 10 points in 2020. In New Jersey, a state Biden won by 16 points, Democratic Governor Phil Murphy only defeated his Republican challenger by a razor-thin margin. What do these elections tell us about the…
 
Expanding economic opportunity for working and middle-class families has been a policy priority for decades, but there are better and worse ways to approach this end-goal. In fact, policies of the past have at times ended up being counterproductive, putting further constraints on working-class families or discouraging healthy behaviors like two-par…
 
The United States' unprecedented withdrawal from Afghanistan this past summer has left a wake of questions and uncertainty. What does a new Afghanistan mean for Iran and U.S. allies in the region? How did U.S. foreign policy progress to this point and what are the lasting implications of this decision? AEI's Michael Rubin is joined by students at S…
 
Despite the Biden administration heralding the pull-out from Afghanistan as a "success," America's tumultuous retreat has sparked outrage and shame both in the United States as well as abroad. Following the suicide bombing at Hamid Karzai International Airport that killed 13 US service members and close to 170 Afghan civilians, Five For Fighting's …
 
World's Fairs hosted in American cities, like Chicago in 1893 and New York in 1964, are remembered as odes to progress. The United States showcased its prowess on the world's stage and exhibitions awed visitors with the latest technological marvels. But America hasn't hosted a World's Fair in nearly 40 years. In this episode, Charles Pappas explore…
 
Congress passed Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act in 1996 when the internet was just coming onto the horizon for commercial use, and there was a need to protect nascent platforms from liability for user-generated content. Often coined “the 26 words that created the internet,” Section 230 is widely credited for fostering the innovative e…
 
The Biden administration is pushing forward its legislative agenda with the Build Back Better program, and Democrats have a number of tax proposals to pay for it. Looking to the largest corporations and the wealthiest Americans, congressional Democrats are constrained by President Biden's pledge not to raise taxes on Americans earning less than $40…
 
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