show episodes
 
From the PBS science series NOVA, a biweekly podcast digging into the science behind the headlines. Alok Patel takes you behind the scenes with the people—scientists, engineers, technologists, mathematicians and more—working to understand our world. Now it's more critical than ever to distinguish fact from fiction and find science-based answers to the most pressing questions of our time. Subscribe, and learn more by visiting pbs.org/novanowpodcast.
 
An award-winning, original, investigative series made by the team behind the acclaimed PBS documentary show, FRONTLINE. From the long and deadly arm of 9/11, to a police shooting in West Virginia with a startling twist, to what life is really like for children living in a Kenyan refugee camp, each episode follows a different reporter through an investigation that sometimes is years in the making. The FRONTLINE Dispatch – because some stories are meant to be heard. Produced at FRONTLINE’s hea ...
 
Under the Radar with Callie Crossley looks to alternative presses and community news for stories that are often overlooked by big media outlets. In our roundtable conversation, we aim to examine the small stories before they become the big headlines with contributors in Boston and New England. For more information, visit our website: wgbhnews.org/utr
 
MASTERPIECE Studio is your backstage pass to the PBS series—from Sherlock to Poldark. After the show, turn off the TV and tune in to MASTERPIECE Studio for the scoop with host Jace Lacob. Listen for exclusive interviews with the cast and crew of your favorite shows. Get the history lowdown behind the people and places you see on screen, and hear revealing stories from the set. MASTERPIECE Studio is made possible by Viking Cruises and Raymond James. Sponsors for MASTERPIECE on PBS are Viking ...
 
NOVA brings you short audio stories from the world of science -- anything from hurricanes to mummies to neutrinos. For more science programming online and on air, visit NOVA's Web site at pbs.org/nova, or watch NOVA broadcasts Wednesday nights on PBS.
 
Every Friday, Amy Walter brings you the trends in politics long before the national media picks up on them. Known as one of the smartest and most trusted journalists in Washington, D.C., Amy Walter is respected by politicians and pundits on all sides of the aisle. You may know Amy her from her work with Cook Political Report and the PBS NewsHour where she looks beyond the breaking news headlines for a deeper understanding of how Washington works, who's pulling the levers of power, and how it ...
 
On Sept. 13, 2018, at 4:04 p.m., an alarm sounded at a natural gas monitoring center in Columbus, Ohio. High-pressured natural gas had just been released into a low-pressure gas line in Massachusetts’ Merrimack Valley. Soon, buildings in Lawrence, Andover and North Andover would explode and catch fire. Thousands of people would be ordered to flee their homes and seek safety on the streets. WGBH Reporters were there to collect their stories and get answers to the questions on everyone’s mind: ...
 
The Scrum is a weekly politics podcast from WGBH News, Boston's PBS and NPR affiliate (89.7 FM), hosted by Adam Reilly and Peter Kadzis. The Scrum focuses on Boston and Massachusetts politics, but makes frequent forays into the national scene — especially when local individuals and issues of note make their influence felt. Talk back to us on Twitter (@reillyadam, @kadzis) or via email: scrum@wgbh.org.
 
NOVA brings you short video stories from the world of science, including excerpts from our television programs, video dispatches from producers and correspondents in the field, animations, and much more. For more science programming online and on air, visit NOVA's Web site at http://www.pbs.org/nova and watch NOVA broadcasts Wednesday nights on PBS. Please note that this feed requires QuickTime 7. Free upgrade available at apple.com/itunes.
 
Watch full episodes of PBS' From the Top at Carnegie Hall, showcasing America’s most extraordinary young musicians aged 8 to 18. Based on the popular NPR program and hosted by acclaimed pianist Christopher O’Riley, the television series takes viewers behind the scenes with today’s rising young musicians, and captures the excitement of their Carnegie Hall debuts.
 
What happens to all that stuff on America’s favorite antiques show once the cameras leave town? DETOURS reveals the stories, secrets, and surprises of TV treasures which go beyond the screen. Join host Adam Monahan, a longtime producer with WGBH’s Antiques Roadshow on a journey of discovery from behind the scenes of the hit PBS series. Each episode tells the deeper story of one object, amazing and amusing listeners along the way. From WGBH and PRX.
 
Hosted by international garden design sensation Jamie Durie and featuring Chef Michel Nischan's James Beard award-winning "Homegrown" cooking segments, The Victory Garden equips viewers with the confidence and inspiration to roll up their sleeves, get their hands dirty, and live outdoors.With so many Americans aspiring to care for the environment and create their own outdoor living spaces, The Victory Garden's unique fusion of garden design, earth-to-table cooking, and eco-conscious how-to t ...
 
In October 1947, the House Un-American Activities Committee opened its hearing into Communist influence in the movie business and promptly denounced 19 prominent directors, producers, screenwriters, and actors as enemies of the state. One of them was Hollywood screenwriter Gordon Kahn, whose films include All Quiet on the Western Front and The African Queen. In this six-part personal history of the Hollywood Blacklist, Gordon Kahn's son, Morning Stories producer Tony Kahn, tells the story of ...
 
NEXT was a radio show and podcast that aired its final episode in May 2021 after a successful five-year run. The weekly program focused on New England, one of America's oldest places, at a time of change. NEXT was produced at Connecticut Public Radio and featured stories from journalists across the New England News Collaborative. Most recently, the program was hosted by Morgan Springer. With New England as our laboratory, NEXT asked questions about how we power our society, how we move aroun ...
 
This eleven-part podcast series, a companion to PBS' Valentine's Day television special, The Hidden Epidemic: Heart Disease In America, features best-selling author, Dr. Michael F. Roizen, M.D. and Larry King of CNN's Larry King Live and the Larry King Cardiac Foundation, along with Julie Bain, Health Director at Reader's Digest magazine. In conversation with Julie Bain, Dr. Roizen explains ten different, easy steps you can take to a healthier heart. In the eleventh podcast, Larry King tells ...
 
Beware, these scary stories will transform you! The Creeping Hour is a horror anthology series hosted by the Creeps, three friends who listened to so many scary stories that they turned into monsters themselves. Gather your whole family to shiver with fright as you listen to the terrifying tales of The Creeping Hour. Listen if you dare. Don’t say we didn’t warn you! The Creeping Hour is a co-production of WGBH and Elie Lichtschein. It is appropriate for all ages and recommended for kids ages ...
 
Produced live at WGBH Studios in Boston, Basic Black *is the longest-running program on public television focusing on the interests of people of color. The show, which was originally called *Say Brother, was created in 1968 during the height of the civil rights movement as a response to the demand for public television programs reflecting the concerns of communities of color. Each episode features a panel discussion across geographic borders and generational lines with the most current stori ...
 
What's your story? WGBH's first-ever live action online series, "One Guest," asks that question and finds answers that are sometimes offbeat, always interesting, and definitely leave you wanting more. Hosted by WGBH talent from various departments within the foundation, "One Guest" is a series of short-form webisodes that feature one-on-one interviews with people throughout New England. And they all have a story to tell.
 
The Truth About Cancer video podcast is an eight-part video series. It is a continuation of the discussions begun in TAKE ONE STEP: A Conversation About Cancer with Linda Ellerbee. Each episode is two to five minutes long. Participating in the podcast discussions are U.S. News and World Report health editor Dr. Bernadine Healy; breast cancer surgeon and Breast Cancer Research stamp mastermind Dr. Ernie Bodai; neurologist and leading palliative care expert Dr. Richard Payne; and counseling ps ...
 
Bird news airs on Wednesdays at 8:35am, Thursday at 12:35pm and Fridays at 4:30pm.E. Vernon Laux is an author and ornithologist who's been birding the Cape and Islands for nearly 40 years. He's the resident naturalist and land manager for the Linda Loring Foundation on Nantucket.
 
Daily highlights from The Takeaway, the national morning news program that delivers the news and analysis you need to catch up, start your day, and prepare for what's ahead. The Takeaway, along with the BBC World Service, The New York Times and WGBH Boston, invites listeners every morning to learn more and be part of the American conversation on-air and online at thetakeaway.org.
 
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show series
 
The island nation of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean continues to suffer from its worst drought in four decades. The lack of rain in southern Madagascar has led to crop failure and mass hunger, all said to be driven by climate change. The UN’s World Food Program says that more than a million people don’t have enough food, and tens of thousands are o…
 
In Russia, there's a green light for a new vaccine trial. The idea is to combine a first dose of the Russian vaccine, Sputnik V, with a second dose of the British AstraZeneca shot. The country’s registry of approved clinical trials shows the small study was scheduled to start July 26 and will enroll 150 volunteers. Related: Immunized but banned: EU…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne talked about the For the People Act, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s (D-CA) rejection of two Republican appointees to a select committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capital attacks. He also remembers the life and legacy of civil rights activist Bob Moses. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a seni…
 
Climate deniers are on the hot seat, as temperatures soar and extreme weather blows through communities across the country. Plus, oil pipelines are on pause — or shut down completely — including the infamous Keystone XL pipeline. And a history-making appointment, as the first African American is named to lead the U.S. Forest Service. Those stories …
 
Students and teachers had their worlds flipped upside down last year when the pandemic forced most to swap chalkboards for Zoom screens. A large part of teaching online, for many, became visual. But what about the challenges of online learning for those who are visually impaired or blind? Our neighbors at Perkins School for the Blind, in Watertown,…
 
Iranians have had enough of their long drought — specifically in Iran's southwestern Khuzestan province, where people are protesting the severe water shortage. They say their hardships are about poor water management. Related: Planting dense urban forests could save Karachi from extreme heat For the past week, crowds of demonstrators have been met …
 
Iranians have had enough of their long drought — specifically in Iran's southwestern Khuzestan province, where people are protesting the severe water shortage. They say their hardships are about poor water management. Related: Planting dense urban forests could save Karachi from extreme heat For the past week, crowds of demonstrators have been met …
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: District Attorney Rachael Rollins discusses investigations into the attack of Rabbi Shlomo Noginski in Brighton, and the shooting in Winthrop that claimed the lives of Air Force veteran Ramona Cooper and retired state trooper David Green. She also talks about her plans to review drug cases that may have been compromise…
 
Democratic Strategy Ahead of 2022 Midterm Elections Six months into Biden’s presidency, The Takeaway looks at the administration's strategy ahead of the 2022 midterm elections. Conservatives Are Changing Their Tune on Vaccines A significant number of high-profile members of conservative media are now urging their audiences to get vaccinated. What t…
 
In Japanese, the word “karoshi” translates to “death by overwork.” As reports of workplace burnout have skyrocketed since the pandemic, it’s a phrase that aptly encapsulates a feeling that thousands of workers have experienced over the past year. But the issue is neither temporary nor solely catalyzed by the pandemic; instead, we face a long-term h…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We start the show by opening phone lines, talking with listeners about the potential return of happy hour. Jenifer McKim shares the latest installment of the investigative series “Unseen,” explaining how dating apps like Grindr perpetuate the abuse, assault, and trafficking of underage boys. McKim is an investigative r…
 
Ever spotted a strange object in the sky? According to a recent report released by the U.S. government, nearly 150 aerial objects observed between 2004 and 2021 remain unidentified—with the exception of one large deflated balloon. The sightings of these objects, once called UFOs and now referred to as Unidentified Aerial Phenomena (UAP), can have a…
 
How exactly can we build a future based on understanding and connection among people of diverse backgrounds— rather than prejudice, misinformation and suspicion that are the fuel for violence? According to the late journalist John Wallach, the answer is to instill this awareness at a young age. He went on to found a truly daring experiment in break…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by opening phone lines, talking with listeners about the Child Tax Credit. Dr. Joseph Cooper explains the history of protest at the Olympics, following the International Olympic Committee urging athletes to remain politically neutral during the Tokyo games. Dr. Cooper is the inaugural J. Keith Motley …
 
Farmwork is hard work. It doesn't stop, even in extreme heat. Many farmworkers across North America are dealing with unbearable temperatures this summer. In the US, many of the people who work in the fields, growing and harvesting fruits and vegetables, are immigrants. Only a handful of states have any labor standards specifically to deal with extr…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We open the show by talking with listeners about the return of mask mandates. Christopher Muther talks about the Winthrop High School students behaving badly on American Airlines Flight 893. He also discusses the opening of the ‘Quin House, and the LGBTQ+ history behind Rehoboth Beach. Muther is a travel writer and col…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by talking with listeners about the rising death toll of unvaccinated Americans, and whether it’s time for mandatory vaccines. Michael Curry explains how communities of color were disparately impacted by the COVID-19 crisis, and shares his thoughts on mandating vaccines. Curry is the president and CEO…
 
Food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Monday, sharing his thoughts on lab-grown foie gras after Paris-based start-up Gourmey raised $10 million from investors to produce foie gras from cell cultures. While many lab-grown meats lack the texture of their natural counterparts, Kummer says that foie gras is especially suited for cell-c…
 
You may know Amelia Earhart as the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. But it's likely you don't know that she lived and worked right here in Boston. Her time spent here was brief, yet critical: This was the place that kicked off her worldwide stardom when she became the first female passenger to fly across the Atlantic in 1928. To m…
 
What is the state of comedy like now in the state of Massachusetts as we emerge from the pandemic? In a year of such loss, increased violence against Asian Americans, and police brutality against Black lives, is it even okay to be funny? Well, if we ever needed a laugh it’s now, so we’re yukking it up with some local women comedians to kick off our…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Rep. Jake Auchincloss discusses the expansion of the Child Tax Credit, and updated us on the status of Congress’ infrastructure bill. He also talks about the evacuation of Afghan citizens who aided the U.S. Rep. Auchincloss is the Democratic congressman representing Massachusetts’ 4th Congressional District. Next, we t…
 
Rep. James Clyburn on Voting Rights, the Filibuster and More Top Democratic lawmakers, including House Majority Whip James Clyburn, are urging their colleagues in the Senate to reform the filibuster in order to pass voting rights legislation. Inflation Is On the Rise in the U.S. As cities and states across the country reopen, inflation is on the ri…
 
A migration crisis is already underway, and it's caused, at least in large part, by climate change, according to modeling by ProPublica and the New York Times Magazine. Their expert analysis shows that without the proper preparation and political will, it will worsen as soon as 2050. Michael Oppenheimer, a professor of Geosciences and International…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Natalie Rodriguez shares her experience opening a restaurant before the start of the pandemic, and explains how her business survived the COVID-19 crisis. Rodriguez is the chef and owner of Nuestra, an authentic Puerto Rican restaurant in Worcester. Then, we talk with listeners about an increase in customers behaving b…
 
How exactly can we build a future based on understanding and connection among people of diverse backgrounds— rather than prejudice, misinformation and suspicion that are the fuel for violence? According to the late journalist John Wallach, the answer is to instill this awareness at a young age. He went on to found a truly daring experiment in break…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners how they felt about the shift to remote working. Jonathan Gruber explains how Los Angeles Angels player Shohei Ohtani is breaking the economic rule of comparative advantage. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts hea…
 
Dozens of people have died in chaotic stampedes as South Africa deals with some of the worst unrest the country has seen in years. Looters ransacked shopping malls in two provinces, stealing food, liquor and clothing. Police and the military fired stun grenades and rubber bullets at the rioters and arrested hundreds of people. Violence continues in…
 
A new report from Sheffield Hallam University in the United Kingdom found that Chinese companies in the solar supply chain in Xinjiang are using Uyghur workers from government-forced labor programs. The report is part of a growing body of evidence of human rights abuses associated with the production of solar materials in China. Related: Reflection…
 
A new report from Sheffield Hallam University in the United Kingdom found that Chinese companies in the solar supply chain in Xinjiang are using Uyghur workers from government-forced labor programs. The report is part of a growing body of evidence of human rights abuses associated with the production of solar materials in China. Related: Reflection…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We start the show by talking with listeners about this month becoming the third rainiest July in Massachusetts on record. Trenni Kusnierek talks about the racist attacks against Black athletes on England’s national football team, and COVID-19 restrictions at the Tokyo Olympics. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NB…
 
The Atlantic’s Corby Kummer returned to Boston Public Radio on Tuesday, weighing in on a recent survey by analysts at the investment bank UBS, which found workers at the popular breakfast-to-go chain Dunkin’ Donuts near the bottom in terms of employee retention. Kummer called the survey “all over the map,” but said most of the chains that fared bes…
 
Last week, LGBTQ student groups in China woke up to find their social media accounts abruptly shut down. It came after several feminist activists had similar shutdowns back in April. When Chinese activist Li Maizi saw another feminist being attacked online by nationalist trolls, she felt that she had to respond. After posting, she found her Weibo a…
 
An astonishing scene unfolded in Cuba over the weekend as thousands took part in anti-government demonstrations across the island. In Bejucal, a town south of Havana, protesters cheered, "Libertad, libertad!" ("Liberty, liberty!") This was a rare moment in a nation that typically cracks down hard on dissent. Protesters took to the streets to expres…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: EJ Dionne talks about the death of former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards. He also weighs in on the Supreme Court’s ruling on two Arizona voting laws, and term limits for Supreme Court justices. Dionne is a columnist for The Washington Post and a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. His latest book is "Code Red: Ho…
 
The U.S. Supreme Court has gutted most of the Voting Rights Act. In a Washington Post column after the decision was announced on July 1, EJ Dionne wrote dryly that the day may as well come to be known as “Oligarchy Day.” EJ Dionne joined Boston Public Radio on Monday, to discuss the ruling, and its implication for American democracy. He said the Su…
 
Digging in the dirt and pulling up weeds is so last century. Whatever you thought about farming is being reimagined, with a new generation plowing the industry into the future. The tools and rural open spaces — which have so long defined traditional farming — are being left behind. More and more, today's farms are in urban areas — with vertical far…
 
At first it seems like a familiar story of office politics, but very soon “The Other Black Girl” unfolds into a tension-filled tale exploring performative diversity policies, unconscious bias, microaggressions and old-fashioned backstabbing. Author Zakiya Dalila Harris’ pitch perfect dialogue, pop culture witticisms, and sharp-edged satire frames t…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by opening phone lines, asking listeners if they thought it was time for the government and employers to mandate vaccines. Andy Ihnatko talks about the multiple states that have filed an antitrust lawsuit against Google, and offers tips on safely handling damaged lithium-ion batteries. Ihnatko is a te…
 
July 2021 is a big month for Amazon’s Founder and former CEO, Jeff Bezos. Not only did he step down as CEO of the company he built into a $1.63 trillion empire, he will also fly into space on the first crewed flight of his New Shepard rocket ship. And yet, the space trip is just the most recent of Bezos’ boundary-breaking endeavors. Bezos and his c…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updates us on the latest political headlines, from vaccine hesitancy amid the rise of the Delta COVID-19 variant to the Supreme Court’s recent ruling on voting rights. Todd is the moderator of “Meet The Press” on NBC, host of “Meet The Press Daily” on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Next, we t…
 
As temperatures continue to rise this summer, the U.S. is experiencing increasingly worse drought conditions with more than 93% of land in seven Western states affected. Though this decades-long dry spell is concentrated in the Western part of the country, droughts have widespread consequences, affecting everything from our national food supply to …
 
For decades, Cuba has sent thousands of health workers to other countries on medical missions, responding to disasters and other situations. The humanitarian efforts mask a program that relies on forced labor and that has earned Cuba billions of dollars, according to Maria Werlau, executive director of the US nonprofit Cuba Archive. “Many people al…
 
This documentary includes our interview with John Lewis, remarkable civil rights leader and the “conscience of Congress.” Mr . Lewis died at age 80 on July 17, 2020. In a country founded of the people, by the people and for the people: What does it mean to be an actively engaged citizen? How can we stimulate more critical thinking and a more delibe…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: Jonathan Gruber explains the economics behind condominiums, from condo ownership to building expenses. He also argues for stronger protections for homeowners in the event of major structural repairs. Gruber is the Ford Professor of Economics at MIT. He was instrumental in creating both the Massachusetts health-care ref…
 
On Wednesday’s Boston Public Radio, food writer Corby Kummer derided the American lunchtime phenomena known as the “sad desk lunch,” where workers are forced to eat at the work spaces in order to save time and boost productivity. The back-and-forth was sparked by a recent New York Times story about the salad chain Sweetgreen, whose owners are prese…
 
Today on Boston Public Radio: We start the show by opening phone lines, asking listeners what they thought could boost nationwide vaccination rates. Trenni Kusnierek talks about Sha’Carri Richardson’s one-month suspension after she tested positive for marijuana. She then discusses Los Angeles Angels player Shohei Ohtani. Kusnierek is a reporter and…
 
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