show episodes
 
Join Kojo and resident analyst Tom Sherwood on Fridays at noon for our weekly review of the politics, policies and personalities in the District of Columbia, Maryland and Virginia. Each week Kojo and Tom help make sense of legislation, hold elected officials accountable and provide in-depth analysis of local issues and elections. The Politics Hour is also a vital forum for Washingtonians to engage directly with their local leaders.
 
Explosions and smoke-filled tunnels. Frustrated riders and epic commutes. This is the new normal on Washington’s Metro. Metropocalypse, a weekly podcast from WAMU 88.5, explores the unprecedented plan to rebuild tracks and re-engineer culture on the nation’s second largest transit system. Send questions & ideas to metro@wamu.org.
 
When a city changes, you can feel it in its local food culture. As the pandemic spread across the U.S., local restaurants closed or adapted, with many relying heavily on takeout and delivery in unprecedented ways. This season on Dish City, hosts Patrick Fort and Ruth Tam discover how food delivery became normal and ponder if it actually benefits restaurants, couriers and diners during the pandemic. From WAMU.
 
Sound Sessions from Smithsonian Folkways is an audio journey into the rich, eclectic, and sometimes eccentric Smithsonian Folkways archive. Host Sam Litzinger and archivist Jeff Place comb the stacks for music and stories about this historic record label for monthly broadcasts that feature newly digitized audio, including rare outtakes, interviews, and never-before-heard recordings. Programs cover American folk icons, emerging artists who are continuing and transforming musical traditions ar ...
 
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show series
 
D.C.'s Deputy Mayor for Public Safety and Justice Chris Geldart talks about how the city is preparing for a right-wing rally amid other weekend events. D.C. Attorney General Karl Racine (D) discusses his lawsuit against Amazon, addressing debt collection practices, and his initiatives to combat hate in the District and across the country.…
 
Twenty years later, September 11, 2001 still feels close to us in the Washington region. In this special program from the WAMU newsroom, we bring you the stories of that day, told from voices across our region. We look at how the events of 9/11 changed us in ways we can’t miss, and in ways we barely notice. We hear how workers at the Pentagon addre…
 
"Quick sign up! Flexible hours! Be your own boss!" The perks of gig work are well-known, but do they actually reflect the reality of drivers working for food delivery apps? Patrick and Ruth try driving for DoorDash to find out. Plus, they interview three drivers in D.C., Seattle, and Denton, Texas, to see how gig workers are fighting for better wor…
 
DoorDash started a decade after its competitors, but now controls half of the food delivery market in the U.S. What can we learn from the very first order its founders delivered? And how did all these third-party platforms reshape the way we think of food delivery? Ruth and Patrick explore the origins of DoorDash and examine whether the "magic wand…
 
In the '60s, delivering pizzas meant wrapping hot pies in a blanket or driving them to customers over open flames. With those humble (and, uh, life-threatening) beginnings, how did we get to the quick and easy delivery everyone knows and loves today? From heatproof bags to rotating ovens, Patrick Fort and Ruth Tam investigate how 'big pizza' change…
 
On a cold November night in 1976, a New York City restaurateur named Misa Chang started sliding delivery menus under her neighbors’ doors for her Chinese restaurant in Manhattan. Chang wasn’t the first to offer delivery, but when delivery gained traction in U.S. cities, Chinese restaurants were often the first to do it. As dishes like chop suey and…
 
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