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TGC Podcast

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TGC Podcast

The Gospel Coalition

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The Gospel Coalition Podcast features keynote and breakout sessions from our national, regional, and women's conferences. We exist to equip the next generation of believers, pastors, and church leaders to shape life and ministry around the gospel.
 
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Gospelbound

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Gospelbound

The Gospel Coalition, Collin Hansen

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Gospelbound, hosted by Collin Hansen for The Gospel Coalition, is a podcast for those searching for firm faith in an anxious age. Each week, Collin talks with insightful guests about books, ideas, and how to navigate life by the gospel of Jesus Christ in a post-Christian culture.
 
Read the Bible features devotional commentaries from D.A. Carson’s book For the Love of God (vol. 1) that follow the M’Cheyne Bible reading plan. This podcast is designed to be used alongside TGC's Read The Bible initiative (TGC.org/readthebible).
 
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Recorded

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Recorded

The Gospel Coalition

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Psalm 102 reminds us to record what God has done so that future generations will praise him. The Gospel Coalition's story-telling podcast, Recorded, chronicles a variety of stories of God’s redemptive and transformative work. These narratives testify to the beauty of the gospel on display in this generation—in many places and in surprising ways. Whether your faith is strong or struggling, tune in to Recorded for encouraging snapshots of God’s faithfulness, nearness, and love.
 
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TGC Q&A

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TGC Q&A

The Gospel Coalition

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Each week, we’re joined by Council members of The Gospel Coalition Council and friends who provide biblical perspective on your most pressing questions. Whatever your doubts or questions may be, this is a space where we hope to share biblical insight into life’s questions together.
 
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You're Not Crazy

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You're Not Crazy

Sam Allberry, Ray Ortlund, The Gospel Coalition

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Are you a young pastor who might be tempted to give up, to even hate the ministry, wondering what on earth you signed up for? In this new podcast, pastors Ray Ortlund and Sam Allberry set out to encourage and remind you that you're not crazy.
 
Explore what it means to follow Jesus Christ within the cultural context of New York City. Join the pastoral team at Trinity Grace Church (TGC) for sermons, teachings, and conversations recorded live at our weekly worship gathering in the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn. Each episode is framed and contextualized specifically for our local congregation and city. This podcast is a production of Trinity Grace Church, a non-denominational Christian church in New York City. Our vision as a ch ...
 
The Gym Closet (A Krave Gym Podcast) is for ATHLETES by ATHLETES. You were born an Athlete, You'll die an Athlete, it's in your DNA. Tyler Robinson, Owner/Strength & Conditioning Coach @ Krave Gym & co-host and Wife Amber Robinson, Owner/Strength Coach & Boss Babe, talk about what it means to live like an athlete. Whether you have a Krave Gym in your state or not learn how to JOIN THE TEAM!
 
This podcast seeks to fire the imagination of Christians who long to practice their faith at work. The podcast features interviews of people who try to practice their faith at work. Guests may be famous or unknown. They may be very successful, quietly faithful, or instructive in their woes. We typically interview mature Christians, but there are exceptions. The common thread is a desire to live by one’s faith and convictions. Guests include professional athletes, award-winning broadcasters, ...
 
The Spurgeon Fellowship Spokane, in partnership with The Gospel Coalition Inland Northwest, seeks to encourage and equip pastors in the Inland Northwest regional area. For more information visit https://inw.thegospelcoalition.org. If you are experiencing a technical difficulty with this podcast or one of the episodes please contact Jason at jjupchurch@yahoo.com.
 
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show series
 
We have already talked about the LCACA in the episode Anatomy of a Confusion (Large Catechism Edition). In this episode, we discuss President Harrison’s statement to resume distribution of this volume, despite severe and thoughtful criticism online and personally from pastors and laity synod wide. ----more---- Host: Fr. Jason Braaten Regular Guest:…
 
“We deserved the flood . . . we are given the ark, and his name is Jesus.” –– Melissa Kruger In her keynote message at TGCW22, Melissa Kruger uses the story of Noah and the flood to illustrate God's unchanging character and grace. She points out three key takeaways: God is just, therefore salvation is needed. God is gracious, therefore salvation is…
 
The Team recaps the winners of 2022 Live to Lift Season and talks all about the new 2023 Make A Move Season. Krave Gym Started the movement LIVE LIKE AN ATHLETE. At Krave Gym our goal is to inspire our athletes to achieve things they once thought were impossible BOTH in the gym and in life. Our TEAM Training Sessions are proven to be more energizin…
 
Bildad the Shuhite is scandalized by Job’s response to Eliphaz and offers his own searing rebuttal (Job 8). “How long will you say such things?” Bildad asks. “Your words are a blustering wind” (Job 8:2). We would say they are nothing but hot air. From Bildad’s perspective, Job is charging God with perverting justice. “Does the Almighty pervert what…
 
In the first episode of The Gods of Our Age, Mark Preus walked us through an introduction. That the people of Rome, Galatia, Corinth, and Ephesus could hardly not know that they were idolaters when Paul preached to them. They had idols of stone and wood and precious metals. They had temples with statues devoted to their gods. We know from Luther’s …
 
In the second part of his response to Eliphaz, Job addresses God directly (Job 7), though we are meant to understand that this agonizing prayer is uttered in such a way that Eliphaz and his friends overhear it. In fact, as we shall see, there is a tight connection between chapters 6 and 7. The first ten verses of moving complaint, full of descripti…
 
Job’s response to Eliphaz takes up two chapters. In Job 6 he argues as follows: (1) In the opening verses (Job 6:1–7) Job insists he has every reason for bemoaning his situation: his anguish and misery are beyond calculation (Job 6:2–3). Nor does Job flinch from the obvious: in God’s universe, God himself must somehow be behind these calamities—“Th…
 
In their booklet “Gospel-Centered Ministry,” TGC cofounders Don Carson and Tim Keller describe how the redemptive story of Scripture, or biblical theology, culminates in Jesus Christ and his gospel. And from Christ, that gospel then guides us in how we live every aspect of our lives. I’ve never seen a book do this work more effectively than Christo…
 
Two pastors thinking out loud about the upcoming Gospel reading. This episode is devoted to the Gospel reading for Sexagesima, Luke 8:4–15 ----more---- Host: Fr. Jason Braaten Regular Guest: Fr. Dave Petersen ----more---- Become a Patron! You can subscribe to the Journal here: https://www.gottesdienst.org/subscribe/ You can read the Gottesblog here…
 
In the second part of his speech (Job 5), Eliphaz presupposes the stance he adopts in the first part (see yesterday’s meditation), yet adds several new wrinkles to his impassioned presentation. First, he says that Job’s approach to God in this crisis is fundamentally flawed. By all means call on God (Job 5:1)—but why imagine that someone as exalted…
 
The first speech of Eliphaz takes up two chapters. In the first part (Job 4), Eliphaz gives shape to his argument: (1) The opening lines are seductive (Job 4:2-4). One might almost think that Eliphaz is respectfully pursuing permission to offer helpful counsel to Job, in the same way that Job in times past has offered helpful counsel to others. But…
 
From Job 3 until the first part of the last chapter of the book, with a small exception at the beginning of chapter 32, the text is written in Hebrew poetry. The book is a giant drama, like a Shakespearean play. Speech follows speech, the movement of the drama carried forward on the sustained argument between Job and his three “friends.” Eventually…
 
It’s one thing to endure with steadfast loyalty when the losses, however painful, are all external; it is quite another thing to endure when one loses one’s health (Job 2). Some reflections: (1) We are still dealing with innocent suffering. God himself declares of Job, “There is no one on earth like him; he is blameless and upright, a man who fears…
 
The Bible deals with the reality of evil in many different ways. Sometimes justice is done, and is seen to be done, in this life. Especially in the New Testament, the final recompense for evil is bound up with judgment to come. Sometimes suffering has a humbling role, as it challenges our endless hubris. War, pestilence, and famine are sometimes Go…
 
In this episode, we take a look at what happened around the release of Luther’s Large Catechism with Annotations and Contemporary Applications (L-CACA), what the good, the bad, and the ugly are, analyzing particular statements in particular essays, and why it was a confused project on multiple layers. ----more---- Host: Fr. Jason Braaten Regular Gu…
 
History looks different in different cultures. I do not simply mean that different cultures interpret the same past differently (though that is often the case), but that the understanding of what history is may vary from culture to culture. Indeed, even within one culture there are often competing notions as to what history is. This issue has becom…
 
Almost everything in Romans 3:21–26 is disputed. There is no space for justifying a particular exegesis. But in my view, these are some of the more important conclusions to be drawn: (1) “But now” (Rom. 3:21): the expression is temporal, not merely logical. Paul has devoted Romans 1:18–3:20 to demonstrating that all of the human race, Jews and Gent…
 
So Haman is hanged (Esther 7). The details of how this point in the narrative is reached simultaneously attest to the providential hand of God and the narrative skills of the author of this little book. Esther’s second garden party leaves Haman completely exposed and utterly defenseless. A few minutes later he falls over himself on Esther’s couch, …
 
Two pastors thinking out loud about the upcoming Gospel reading. This episode is devoted to the Gospel reading for Septuagesima, Matthew 20:1–16. ----more---- Host: Fr. Jason Braaten Regular Guest: Fr. Dave Petersen ----more---- Become a Patron! You can subscribe to the Journal here: https://www.gottesdienst.org/subscribe/ You can read the Gottesbl…
 
That night, the king could not sleep (Esther 6:1). What a great dramatic line! Are we supposed to think this is an accident? Both the Bible and history offer countless “coincidences” brought about in the providence of God, the significance of which is discerned only in hindsight. Even in this chapter, Haman chooses this particular morning to presen…
 
Three observations that spring from Esther 5: First, the pace of the story prompts a cultural observation. There is much in our culture that demands instantaneous decision. That is as true in the ecclesiastical arena as in the political. We observe what we judge to be an injustice and immediately we get on the phone, fire off E-mails, or huddle in …
 
For narrative simplicity and power, the book of Esther readily captures the imagination. Though by now we are three chapters into it, we can pick up something of both its flavor and its message by reflecting on selected elements of Esther 4. (1) The book makes its profound theological points by the shape of its restrained narrative. Commentators ne…
 
“Accomplishing the Great Commission will not be easy, but we’ve been commanded by God to take the gospel to all people groups.” — David Platt In his message at TGC's 2021 National Conference, David Platt urges local church leaders and pastors to prioritize the 3 billion unreached people across the globe. He reminds these leaders that God has comman…
 
In Acts 26, Luke provides the third account in this book of Paul’s conversion (compare Acts 9 and Acts 22). Each has a different aim, of course. Here Paul is defending himself before the Roman Governor Porcius Festus and Herod Agrippa II of Galilee. Important highlights include the following: (1) As in earlier defenses, Paul stresses his continuity…
 
Aaron Renn has persuasively argued that we now live in the “negative world” with respect to Christianity. Being Christian is sociologically speaking, no longer seen by society as a positive good or even a neutral thing, but rather a negative evil — something to be gotten rid of (“Three Worlds” in First Things). Our guest has seen this born out in h…
 
The change in governor from Felix to Porcius Festus (Acts 24:27) brings no immediate improvement in Paul’s condition. Yet God remains in control, and in this chapter, Acts 25, under God’s providence Paul takes a decisive step. How was this brought about? (1) New to the area and still relatively ignorant of its political and religious dynamics, Fest…
 
In the trial of Paul before Felix (Acts 24), the governor comes across as a man in authority who has no moral vision authorizing him to take decisive action. He is, in short, a moral wimp. He also represents the many powerful people who are disturbed by the Gospel, and at some deep level know that it is true, yet who never become Christians. Note: …
 
In his forthcoming book, Timothy Keller: His Spiritual and Intellectual Formation, Collin Hansen aims to add to our understanding of evangelical history in the second half of the 20th century into the early 21st century. Keller’s life spans and intersects with many of the most significant people, events, and trends within Christianity during the la…
 
Two pastors thinking out loud about the upcoming Gospel reading. This episode is devoted to the Gospel reading for The Feast of the Transfiguration of Our Lord, Matthew 17:1–9. ----more---- Host: Fr. Jason Braaten Regular Guest: Fr. Dave Petersen ----more---- Become a Patron! You can subscribe to the Journal here: https://www.gottesdienst.org/subsc…
 
One of the most striking evidences of sinful human nature lies in the universal propensity for downward drift. In other words, it takes thought, resolve, energy, and effort to bring about reform. In the grace of God, sometimes human beings display such virtues. But where such virtues are absent, the drift is invariably toward compromise, comfort, i…
 
Reading Paul’s impromptu defense to the crowd (Acts 22), one is struck by the sparse simplicity of the narrative. But two details urge reflection here: First, we must ask why the crowd turns nasty when it does. When Paul starts to address the people in their mother tongue, Aramaic, initially “they became very quiet” (Acts 22:2). They listen to the …
 
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