show episodes
 
Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE for Sociology. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.
 
Hosts Lizzie Post and Daniel Post Senning answer audience questions about modern etiquette with advice based on consideration, respect, and honesty. Like their great-great-grandmother, Emily Post, Lizzie and Dan look for the reasons behinds the traditional rules to guide their search for the correct behavior in all kinds of contemporary situations. Test your social acumen and join the discussion about civility and decency in today's complex world.
 
Interested in human behavior and how people think? The Measure of Everyday Life is a weekly interview program featuring innovations in social science and ideas from leading researchers and commentators. Independent Weekly has called the show "unexpected" and "diverse" and says the show "brings big questions to radio." Join host Dr. Brian Southwell (@BrianSouthwell) as he explores the human condition. Episodes air each Sunday night at 6:30 PM in the Raleigh-Durham broadcast market and a podca ...
 
From Plato to quantum physics, Walter Benjamin to experimental poetry, Frantz Fanon to the history of political radicalism, The Podcast for Social Research is a crucial part of our mission to forge new, organic paths for intellectual work in the twenty-first century: an ongoing, interdisciplinary series featuring members of the Institute, and occasional guests, conversing about a wide variety of intellectual issues, some perennial, some newly pressing. Each episode centers on a different top ...
 
If you want to understand how social scientists’ study human behaviour, how industry innovates or want to know more about how they can successfully work together and enhance each other, then you have come to the right place! Join our hosts as they engage with anthropologists, other researchers and industry specialists from all over the world. The discussions will be about their specific work in understanding people and how they apply that understanding to advance industry, scholarship and/or ...
 
Join your host, Jonathan Singer, Ph.D., LCSW in an exploration of all things social work, including direct practice, human behavior in the social environment, research, policy, field work, social work education, and everything in between. Big names talking about bigger ideas. The purpose of the podcast is to present information in a user-friendly format. Although the intended audience is social workers, the information will be useful to anyone in a helping profession (including psychology, n ...
 
inSocialWork is the podcast series of the University at Buffalo School of Social Work. The purpose of this series is to engage practitioners and researchers in lifelong learning and to promote research to practice, practice to research. inSocialWork features conversations with prominent social work professionals, interviews with cutting-edge researchers, and information on emerging trends and best practices in the field of social work.
 
Aloha, Welcome to the TrueLife podcast. Take a deep breath because we are going to take a deep dive into the depths of the unconscious mind. Psychology, philosophy, psychedelic research and social engineering are but a few of the locations we will be investigating. Tactical empathy, purple dawn theory, beautiful beaches, & book reviews because some times you get shown the light in the strangest of places if you look at it right.
 
Unabridged philosophy audiobooks including writing by Plato (Parmenides), Aristotle (Economics) and Cicero (On Moral Duties). Topics discussed include ethics, justice, law, logic, metaphysics, God, happiness, love and beauty. Each book has been streamlined by merging separate LibriVox recordings into a single seamless whole with no interruptions. Painting: La Perle et la vague by Paul-Jacques-Aimé Baudry.
 
Economists say the way we work has become so stressful it’s now the fifth leading cause of death. Our mission is to find a better way. Explore the art and science of living a full and healthy life with behavioral and social science researchers who can help us better understand what drives our human experiences, and how to change. Better Life Lab is a co-production from New America and Slate.
 
Highly Inspired presents a variety of topics relating to life in the 21st century. We relish technology, business, science, and entertainment, and encourage all opportunities for growth of the mind. The show's hosts, Jordan and Ella, dissect relevant current events, pop culture, and psychology, but with a comedic twist. Join us on the endless journey of self-development. Explore ideas. Be a generalist.
 
Ever hear a godawful song and wonder just how the hell it got made? You came to the right place! On this show and engineer and a barista take a deep dive into history's cringe-iest earworms and learn some awfully fascinating things in the process. Behind every bad song there's a good story!
 
Edward Thomas, a curious teenager, is out to find answers to life's most mysterious questions. Join him in his journey to find everything out there - just waiting to be found! In biweekly, thought-provoking or explorative episodes that are less that ten minutes long, learn more about the world you live in while on the drive to work, waiting at the driver-thru, or whipping together breakfast.
 
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show series
 
Based on longitudinal ethnographic work on migration between the United States and Taiwan, Time and Migration: How Long-Term Taiwanese Migrants Negotiate Later Life (Cornell UP, 2021) interrogates how long-term immigrants negotiate their needs as they grow older and how transnational migration shapes later-life transitions. Ken Chih-Yan Sun develop…
 
In this episode, Matthew talks to the journalist, writer, broadcaster and researcher - Julie Bindel. Julie writes regularly for The Guardian newspaper, the New Statesman, The Sunday Telegraph and Standpoint magazines, and appears regularly on the BBC and Sky News. Julie's focus in on issues such as rape, domestic violence, sexually motivated murder…
 
The Mahabharata preserves powerful journeys of women recognized as the feminine divine and the feminine heroic in the larger culture of India. Each journey upholds the unique aspects of women's life. Feminine Journeys of the Mahabharata: Hindu Women in History, Text, and Practice (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021) analytically examines the narratives of el…
 
Scholars of state socialism have frequently invoked “nostalgia” to identify an uncritical longing for the utopian ambitions and lived experience of the former Eastern Bloc. However, this concept seems insufficient to describe memory cultures in the Czech Republic and other contexts in which a “retro” fascination with the past has proven compatible …
 
This collection of narrative essays by sex workers presents a crystal-clear rejoinder: there's never been a better time to fight for justice. Responding to the resurgence of the #MeToo movement in 2017, sex workers from across the industry--hookers and prostitutes, strippers and dancers, porn stars, cam models, Dommes and subs alike--complicate nar…
 
According to the National Institute on Aging, "Alzheimer’s disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills and, eventually, the ability to carry out the simplest tasks. In most people with the disease—those with the late-onset type—symptoms first appear in their mid-60s" (National Institute on …
 
Transcript: https://app.podscribe.ai/episode/71643670 Speaker 0 (0s): Welcome back. My friends. Welcome back. Hope everybody is enjoying the day. The moment in your life, your relationships, your constant classroom, learning the idea that as you go through life, you begin to see things from different points of view. Hopefully, hopefully the lessons…
 
Post-socialist China has seen extensive labor unrest in the form of strikes, protests, and riots. The party-state has responded, sometimes with greater repression, sometimes with institutional changes to better channel and represent worker interests, and sometimes with both. Manfred Elfstrom’s Workers and Change in China: Resistance, Repression, Re…
 
Victoria Canning and Steve Tombs' book From Social Harm to Zemiology: A Critical Introduction (Routledge, 2021) outlines key developments in understanding social harm by setting out its historical foundations and the discussions which have proliferated since. It examines various attempts to conceptualise social harm and highlights key sites of cont…
 
Chris Martenson, PhD (Duke), MBA (Cornell) is an economic researcher and futurist specializing in energy and resource depletion, and founder of PeakProsperity.com. As one of the early econobloggers who forecasted the housing market collapse and stock market correction years in advance, Chris rose to prominence with the launch of his seminal video s…
 
Alex Elle complicates the idea of self-care, opening it up as community-care, as a way towards generational healing. And she’s revivifying the meaning of meeting one’s “inner child” for a new generation. Our colleague Lily Percy says she could not have survived the physical isolation of the pandemic without Alex’s writing, teaching, and Instagram p…
 
Alex Elle complicates the idea of self-care, opening it up as community-care, as a way towards generational healing. And she’s revivifying the meaning of meeting one’s “inner child” for a new generation. Our colleague Lily Percy says she could not have survived the physical isolation of the pandemic without Alex’s writing, teaching, and Instagram p…
 
In Rebirthing a Nation: White Women, Identity Politics, and the Internet (U Mississippi Press, 2021), author Wendy K. Z. Anderson details how white nationalist and alt-right women refine racist rhetoric and web design as a means of protection and simultaneous instantiation of white supremacy, which conservative political actors including Sarah Pali…
 
Contrary to claims that socialism opposed the family unit, in Laboring for the State : Women, Family, and Work in Revolutionary Cuba, 1959-1971 (Cambridge University Press, 2020) Rachel Hynson argues that the revolutionary Cuban government engaged in social engineering to redefine the nuclear family and organize citizens to serve the state. Drawing…
 
Contrary to claims that socialism opposed the family unit, in Laboring for the State : Women, Family, and Work in Revolutionary Cuba, 1959-1971 (Cambridge University Press, 2020) Rachel Hynson argues that the revolutionary Cuban government engaged in social engineering to redefine the nuclear family and organize citizens to serve the state. Drawing…
 
Erin Duncan O’Neill (Assistant Professor, University of Oklahoma) speaks with Elizabeth Emery (Professor, Montclair State University) about Emery’s recent book, Reframing Japonisme: Women and the Asian Art Market in Nineteenth-Century France, 1853-1914 (Bloomsbury, 2020). Women figured prominently among the leading collectors and purveyors of Asian…
 
Gather round, employees! I’ve bought you all something so special. You’ll want to work twice as hard once you see what it is. Drumroll please. It’s tickets to the opera! What’s that? You don’t care for hours of singing in German? You can’t easily get a babysitter for a four-hour trip to the big city much less pay for parking? Well, guess I should h…
 
It’s 7PM, February 16th, 1981. Arne Cheyene Johnson, 19, has just been arrested for the murder of his 40-year-old friend and landlord, Alan Bono. Arne Stabbed Bono over 20 times after getting into an altercation about an unknown female. Fascinatingly, Arne Johnson claimed to have no memory of the event, stating that he was possessed by the devil af…
 
In this episode, Chris Hadnagy and Ryan MacDougall are joined by Rockie Brockway. Rockie is currently the Practice Lead for the Office of the CSO for TrustedSec. With over 28 years' experience in information security and business risk, Rockie specializes in Business Risk Analysis and the inherent relationships between data, assets, adversaries, and…
 
We've got a throwback for you from our second season! Dr. Nicholas Chagnon joins us to get into the nitty gritty of critical feminism and feminist criminology. We untangle the many aspects of feminism, and learn how these perspectives analyze women’s reproductive rights, as well as how they approach criminology from a female-centered perspective. T…
 
In the United States, employers are planning for people to return to workplaces, yet not everyone is ready to go and some of those who worked onsite throughout the pandemic are exhausted and not fully recovered from the trauma of the past year. On this episode, we talk with psychiatry professor Dr. Nadia Charguia of the University of North Carolina…
 
Whether referring to a place, a nonhuman animal or plant, or a state of mind, wild indicates autonomy and agency, a unique expression of life. Yet two contrasting ideas about wild nature permeate contemporary discussions: either that nature is most wild in the absence of a defiling human presence, or that nature is completely humanized and nothing …
 
It is almost twenty years since contemporary art took a ‘participation turn’. Now, just about every museum or theatre company has a participation or engagement department. It is nothing short of orthodoxy that one of art’s core roles is to reach out to audiences beyond art institutions - and paradoxically it is often art institutions that mandate t…
 
What is the future of the book? In Book Wars: The Digital Revolution in Publishing (Polity, 2021) John Thompson, Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge, examines the impact of digital technology on the publishing industry. The book grapples with broad questions of the changing nature of capitalism, the idea of information capital, an…
 
Kincraft: The Making of Black Evangelical Sociality (Duke University Press, 2021) by Todne Thomas takes a deep dive into the social and religious lives of two black evangelical churches in the Atlanta metro area. Thomas ethnographically renders the ways in which black evangelicals engage in a process of producing kin or crafting relatedness through…
 
How does the record industry work? In Getting Signed: Record Contracts, Musicians, and Power in Society (Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), David Arditi, Associate Professor in Sociology and Anthropology at University of Texas at Arlington, analyses the ideology of getting signed and getting a record contract to show the alienating and exploitative effects…
 
According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness, "Dissociative identity disorder (DID), previously referred to as multiple personality disorder, is a dissociative disorder involving a disturbance of identity in which two or more separate and distinct personality states (or identities) control an individual’s behavior at different times. When u…
 
For this episode, we hear from Maia Cucchiara, a professor of Urban Education at Temple University. She talks about low-income mothers’ experiences with parenting education courses, which are designed to teach parenting techniques and about things like child development. They might be offered in schools or community settings and participation is so…
 
Miriah Meyer is an associate professor in the School of Computing at the University of Utah and a faculty member in the Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute. She co-directs the Visualization Design Lab, which focuses on the design of visualization systems for helping people make sense of complex data, and on the development of methods for hel…
 
In this episode, our guest Dr. Laura Johnson describes the domestic violence response team program, which is a collaborative partnership between domestic violence organizations and law enforcement. Findings from her research project examining factors that contribute to police officer support for a police-advocate partnership intervention are discus…
 
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