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Best Society Podcasts We Could Find
Best Society Podcasts We Could Find
Over the years, podcasts have become an increasingly popular medium because they are well-packed, can be followed from any place, at any time and without Internet connection. Listening to podcasts enables people gain a clearer insight about the social affairs and social issues in every corner of the world. In this catalog, there are podcasts where well-read hosts and guests discuss about people of different religions and their way of life and culture, of different communities, countries, continents, different philosophies as well as different points of view on society. Also, literature fans can learn more about the latest news from their favourite genres, emerging authors, current best selling books and literary theories. Furthermore, people can find interviews and true and inspiring life stories told by people from all walks of life. Some podcasts house activists who fight for the rights of the oppressed, ranging from animals to people, aiming at creating a better society.
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Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.
 
Mysterious Universe is a weekly podcast featuring fascinatingly strange reports from all over the world. Always interesting and often hilarious, join hosts Aaron Wright and Benjamin Grundy as they investigate the latest in futurology, weird science, consciousness research, alternative history, cryptozoology, UFOs, and new-age absurdity.
 
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Thousands of years before the current day, ancient civilizations accurately predicted both lunar and solar eclipses. They often believed these events were spiritual omens. When an eclipse came at an inauspicious time, multiple priestly classes scrambled to find a substitute king. In the interest of preserving society, these substitute kings would r…
 
Former Stanford University undergraduate dean Julie Lythcott-Haims' new book, 'Your Turn: How to Be an Adult,' is a handbook on adulthood, offering insights and strategies on education and career choices, building friendships and coping with setbacks. Her 2017 memoir, 'Real American,' is the story of her coming to terms with her biracial identity. …
 
Integral Theory has been a hugely influential school of thought in alternative communities for decades, likely peaking in the early 2000s. Created largely by the philosopher Ken Wilber, it still maintains a strong influence, and has featured several times on Rebel Wisdom. What light can it shed on current cultural dynamics? This was a discussion on…
 
Paul Mendez is a British writer, Beyoncé superfan and once devout Jehovah's Witness. Growing up in the Midlands, where his Jamaican grandparents settled, Paul was all about preaching, paradise and playing Monopoly with elderly ladies. But at 17, he was cast out from his congregation. Alone and looking for new friends, life took an unexpected and da…
 
As we approach the 80th anniversary of Nazi Germany’s fateful invasion of the Soviet Union in 1941, the historian, author and broadcaster Jonathan Dimbleby revisits the dramatic, murderous struggle between the two totalitarian regimes. (Ad) Jonathan Dimbleby is the author of Barbarossa: How Hitler Lost the War (Penguin, 2021) Buy it now from Amazon…
 
The original rude girl and ‘Queen of Ska’ Pauline Black was working as a radiographer when she came to prominence in the late 1970s as the lead singer of the 2 Tone ska revival band The Selecter. Pauline joins Anita to talk about being the only girl on tour alongside The Specials and Madness, expressing herself as a young black woman through music,…
 
Mike tells Sarah how liberal magazines turned a "kids these days" moral panic into a national crisis. Digressions include Law & Order, Dave Foley and swimming pool etiquette. This episode contains detailed descriptions of sexual assault, mass shootings and suicide. Support us: Subscribe on Patreon Donate on Paypal Buy cute merch Where else to find …
 
This awards season, pull back the curtain on Tinseltown’s most infamous controversies in the new Spotify Original from Parcast, Hollywood Scandals. You can hear the first episode on Hollywood’s sordid beginnings right here, then follow Hollywood Scandals for an episode every Monday. Listen free, only on Spotify! Learn more about your ad choices. Vi…
 
For free mental health resources, please visit SomethingWasWrong.com/Resources Support SWW on Patreon for as little as $1 a month Follow Tiffany Reese on Instagram Music from Glad Rags album Wonder Under Get 20% off your first order at ThirdLove.com/SWW Join Thrive Market today to get 25% off your first order AND an exclusive FREE gift at ThriveMar…
 
In this episode of Half-Arsed History, learn the stories of the Servile Wars, three slave revolts from ancient Rome that led to the emergence of legendary figures such as Spartacus. https://halfarsedhistory.files.wordpress.com/2021/04/147-the-servile-wars.mp3 Download Episode (Right click and select “Save as…”) Image: Vogel, Herman. Death of Sparta…
 
The Suez Crisis – sparked by an ill-fated Anglo-French-Israeli invasion of Egypt in 1956 – is often viewed as a turning point in modern British history, when the nation finally lost its superpower status. Alex von Tunzelmann answers your questions on this diplomatic debacle, from why Anthony Eden thought the invasion a gamble worth taking, to how i…
 
Up until the last several years, Kimberley Lake lived a pretty typical life; a married mom, holding down a stable office job... but for reasons not fully known her life changed dramatically when almost in an instant she lost her vision almost fully. As you will hear Kim describe in this episode, her vision loss obviously created a tremendous amount…
 
Actor and writer Dame Maureen Lipman recently lost Guido Castro, her partner of more than thirteen years, having already been widowed in 2004 when her husband Jack Rosenthal died after 30 years of marriage. She tells us how you come to terms with such a loss after so long.Why do some people live in vans? Is it to save money to put down a deposit on…
 
Sandra Day O'Connor was appointed to America's top court in 1981. She'd been nominated by newly-elected Republican president Ronald Reagan. Also in the programme: an eye-witness on the beaches during the failed Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba, the worm that unlocked secrets of genetics in the 1960s, the decline of the South Asian vulture and China's "…
 
Author Roland Philipps talks about his latest book, Victoire: A Wartime Story of Resistance, Collaboration and Betrayal, which recounts the extraordinary exploits of Mathilde Carré, a double – possibly even triple – agent in the Second World War. (Ad) Roland Philipps is the author of Victoire: A Wartime Story of Resistance, Collaboration and Betray…
 
In the late 1990s, lawyer Jacqueline Moudeina took on one of the most important cases in African legal history – the trial of Chad's former dictator Hissène Habré. He's a man who had massacred and tortured his people, including members of Jacqueline’s own family. She was determined to get justice, even if it took decades and meant risking her life.…
 
'Twyla Moves,' a new documentary by PBS American Masters, tells the story of the legendary choreographer and dancer, who got her start performing on subway platforms and rooftops in the 1960s. "If it was kind of level, it was fair territory," she tells Terry Gross. Kevin Whitehead reviews a newly unearthed album from Hasaan Ibn Ali. 'Finding Your R…
 
Louise Erdrich's novel, 'The Night Watchman,' was inspired by her grandfather, a chairman of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa who fought a Congressional initiative to move indigenous peoples off their land and into cities. Erdrich says the policy amounted to tribal termination. "Termination was a way to finally resolve what Congress thought of …
 
The saying goes that “God works in mysterious ways” and what a more mysterious way of spreading the gospel than through instantaneous teleportation! According to some experiencers, all across the world there are many people experiencing this powerful phenomenon. It is said some are being transported to pray for the sick and provide deliverance to t…
 
Imelda May is an Irish singer/songwriter discovered by Jools Holland when she supported him on tour and subsequently appeared on Later ... with Jools Holland in 2008. She was the queen of rockabilly, with a Fifties-style frock, trademark quiff – and a voice compared to legendary blues singers such as Billie Holiday and Sarah Vaughan. The quiff is l…
 
The Mosuo community in China’s Himalayan foothills is matrilineal, so a family’s ‘bloodline’, inheritance and power is passed down through the female side. There is no such thing as marriage and monogamy is actively discouraged. The women rule and the men don’t mind. Rebecca Kesby has been speaking to Choo Wai Hong, a Singaporean corporate lawyer w…
 
Stephen Sackur interviews Silvia Foti, an American writer whose grandfather was a Lithuanian man hailed as heroic patriot who paid with his life resisting the Soviets. But according to his granddaughter, Jonas Noreika was no hero - he had the blood of thousands of Jews on his hands. She’s chosen to speak out, angering many in Lithuania. What happen…
 
Greg Jenner is joined by historian Prof Sarah Churchwell and comedian Kemah Bob in 1920s USA to hear about the implementation and after effects of Prohibition. From bootleggers to speakeasies, we learn the origins of the Prohibition Laws and discover why a movement designed to encourage temperance backfired.Produced by Cornelius MendezScript by Gre…
 
In 1919, Romain Rolland wrote the Declaration of the Independence of the Mind as a call to intellectuals to rise above division, censorship and nationalism of their day. Nahlah Ayed speaks to Canadian and international thinkers to consider the role of the intellectual today, and to rewrite the declaration for our own post-truth moment. *This episod…
 
In the decade leading up to the Iranian revolution of 1979, the Shah's wife, Farah Pahlavi spent much of her time encouraging the building of museums and institutions intended to celebrate the art and craft of the country. But alongside buildings housing priceless carpets and glassware, she was also keen to use the country's oil wealth to bring exa…
 
Welcome to another episode of Conversations with Coleman. My guest today is Tristan Harris. Tristan is a computer scientist and president of the Centre for Humane Technology. He was named TIME 100's 'next leader shaping the future', and Rolling Stone magazine's '25 people shaping the world'. Tristan is the co host of Your Undivided Attention, consi…
 
As the pineapple craze swept through Europe's upper class, aristocrats worked tirelessly to grow their own pineapples. This was no small feat, since pineapples aren't suited to the European climate. Still, some clever inventors and gardeners figured it out -- and, along the way, non-aristocrats also got into the trend. Since most people couldn't af…
 
Social media apologies have become the standard celebrity response to internet outrage. But why do they feel so deeply inadequate? Jenna and Wesley dissect a new spate of public apologies from the last year. And they look to the activist and writer adrienne maree brown for an example of a “fully evolved” apology. You can find more info about today’…
 
16 April 1746, the Jacobite rising was quelled by the Duke of Cumberland's army at the Battle of Culloden. Marking this anniversary here's a chance to hear Matthew Sweet discussing portrayals of Scotland's Highlands in the Peter Watkins' film Culloden and in the Outlander series of books which have become a successful TV series. His guests in a con…
 
Recently, we released 'Endgame for the Psychedelic Renaissance?' in which Alexander Beiner caught up with Jamie Wheal to make sense of recent tensions in the psychedelic space around patenting, IP disputes and lobbying. In this follow up, we move the conversation forward to explore possible ways to reboot the psychedelic renaissance. Jamie lays out…
 
A woman who won a settlement from the Catholic Church after reporting the abuse she suffered, is now launching a personal injury claim against Westminster Diocese. It's because of a series of emails which she says describe her as needy, manipulative and a bully. She explains to Woman's Hour what she wants to achieve. A legal challenge began in the …
 
Yasmin Alibhai-Brown picks Nigerian novelist, Chinua Achebe, the author of Things Fall Apart. With archive contributions from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie and Chinua Achebe himself. He was born in Nigeria in 1930 and Yasmin Alibhai Brown met him twice in Uganda in the 1960s and remains deeply impressed by both his books and his life.The presenter is Ma…
 
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