show episodes
 
Hosts Lizzie Post and Daniel Post Senning answer audience questions about modern etiquette with advice based on consideration, respect, and honesty. Like their great-great-grandmother, Emily Post, Lizzie and Dan look for the reasons behinds the traditional rules to guide their search for the correct behavior in all kinds of contemporary situations. Test your social acumen and join the discussion about civility and decency in today's complex world.
 
There’s a reason the History Channel has produced hundreds of documentaries about Hitler but only a few about Dwight D. Eisenhower. Bad guys (and gals) are eternally fascinating. Behind the Bastards dives in past the Cliffs Notes of the worst humans in history and exposes the bizarre realities of their lives. Listeners will learn about the young adult novels that helped Hitler form his monstrous ideology, the founder of Blackwater’s insane quest to build his own Air Force, the bizarre lives ...
 
Join us each month as we engage in philosophical discussions about the most common-place topics with host Jack Russell Weinstein, professor in the Department of Philosophy and Religion at the University of North Dakota. He is the director of The Institute for Philosophy in Public Life.
 
Exploring the biggest questions of our time with the help of the world's greatest thinkers. Host Manoush Zomorodi inspires us to learn more about the world, our communities, and most importantly, ourselves. Get more brainy miscellany with TED Radio Hour+. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/ted
 
In each episode, we talk with inspiring scientists, thinkers, and other self-actualized individuals who will give you a greater understanding of yourself, others, and the world we live in. Scott Barry Kaufman explores the depths of human potential and tries to get a glimpse into human possibility in every episode.
 
The true science behind our most popular urban legends. Historical mysteries, paranormal claims, popular science myths, aliens and UFO reports, conspiracy theories, and worthless alternative medicine schemes... Skeptoid has you covered. From the sublime to the startling, no topic is sacred. Weekly since 2006.
 
The History of the Cold War Podcast will cover the Cold War from the period of roughly 1945 to 1991 and the fall of the Soviet Union in monthly installments on the first. This Podcast will examine the Cold War from a number of different perspectives including political, diplomatic, cultural, ideological etc. This series is intended to be a grand narrative of the conflict exploring it from its early origins to its final moments and its effects on the world today. Please join us on this incred ...
 
I'm creating podcast episodes offering practical wisdom for everyday life -- solutions to modern human concerns -- informed by the ancient philosophical school of Stoicism popularized by thinkers including Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius. Improve your quality of life by implementing a strong mental framework informed by Stoic Philosophy! I explore topics such as gratitude; acceptance; overcoming adversity; finding meaning in life; moderation; dealing with change; friendship; lonelines ...
 
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COMPLEXITY

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COMPLEXITY

Santa Fe Institute, Michael Garfield

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Far-reaching conversations with a worldwide network of scientists and mathematicians, philosophers and artists developing new frameworks to explain our universe's deepest mysteries. Join host Michael Garfield at the Santa Fe Institute each week to learn about your world and the people who have dedicated their lives to exploring its emergent order: their stories, research, and insights…
 
Learn to use the sciences of the mind to help you understand what makes you emotionally tick. Two Austin therapists and their world-recognized guest experts break down the research in modern attachment, relational neuroscience and trauma in a challenging but entertaining format to keep you off autopilot and moving towards closer connections.
 
9Honey presents The Windsors – a royal podcast. Join us as we go inside the palace walls to get to know the world’s most famous family. Hosted by Kerri Elstub with expert commentary from 9Honey’s royal columnist, Victoria Arbiter, and Australian Women’s Weekly editor-at-large and author of The Royals in Australia, Juliet Rieden.
 
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Navigating Neuropsychology

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Navigating Neuropsychology

John Bellone & Ryan Van Patten - NavNeuro

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Join John and Ryan as they explore the field of neuropsychology through the presentation of cutting edge scientific findings, discussion of important topic areas, and interviews with experts in a variety of relevant fields. The three main objectives of the podcast are to 1) Provide interesting, relevant, and easily-accessible information for students and professionals in neuropsychology, as well as anyone who is interested in brain-behavior relationships. 2) Begin working towards unification ...
 
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SAGE Sociology

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SAGE Sociology

SAGE Publications Ltd.

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Welcome to the official free Podcast site from SAGE for Sociology. SAGE is a leading international publisher of journals, books, and electronic media for academic, educational, and professional markets with principal offices in Los Angeles, London, New Delhi, and Singapore.
 
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STAT!

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STAT!

Medical True Crime

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This podcast is about strange medicine. I will use my experience as an ER nurse to explore the world of medicine. True Crime, coroners cases, medical mysteries, bizarre treatments from around the world, scary diseases and medical breakthroughs. Real life stories from the Emergency Room. Sometimes it's the cure that kills you!
 
How are the things we're talking about being talked about somewhere else in the world? Gregory Warner tells stories that follow familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory. At a time when the world seems small but it's as hard as ever to escape our echo chambers, Rough Translation takes you places.
 
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Science for the People

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Science for the People

Rachelle Saunders, Bethany Brookshire, and Carolyn Wilke

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Science for the People is a long-format interview podcast that explores the connections between science, popular culture, history, and public policy, to help listeners understand the evidence and arguments behind what's in the news and on the shelves. Our hosts sit down with science researchers, writers, authors, journalists, and experts to discuss science from the past, the science that affects our lives today, and how science might change our future.
 
Tune in to the Always Already Podcast for indulgent conversations about critical theory (in the broadest read of the term!). Our podcast consists of two episode streams. The first is a discussion of texts spanning critical theory, political theory, social theory, and philosophy. We work through and analyze main ideas, underlying assumptions, connections with other texts and theories, and occasionally delve into the great abyss of free association, ad hoc theory jokes, and makeshift puns. The ...
 
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show series
 
In this Social Science Bites podcast, interviewer David Edmonds asks psychologist Kathryn Paige Harden what she could divine about his educational achievements if all she knew about him was his complete genome. “Based just on your genetic information,” she starts, “I would be able to guess about as well as I would be able to guess if I knew how muc…
 
In this short podcast, I discuss the upcoming 5 Hour Social Sciences/Communications and Ethics Class for Step 1-3 (2/28 from 4-9 pm MST), 20 hr Step 2/3/Shelf exam course that takes place from 2/20-21 and 2/23-34 (4-9 pm MST each day), the NBME test taking strategies course for Step 1-3, taking place from 5-7.30 pm MST on 2/17, and the 4 hr biostat…
 
We have usually relied on public intellectuals to provide facts, ideas, and cultural leadership--though not all have lived up to the ideal of “speaking truth to power.” Today, however, online networks and social media mean we are all public intellectuals, and we have new responsibilities that come with this role. Guests: Cornel West, professor at U…
 
Over the past 50 years, scholars across the social sciences have employed critical juncture analysis to understand how social orders are created, become entrenched, and change. In this book, leading scholars from several disciplines offer the first coordinated effort to define this field of research, assess its theoretical and methodological founda…
 
Do you struggle with understanding normal and high anion gap metabolic acidosis? This series is exactly what you need. In this first part, I lay the requisite foundation. In the next part, I will focus on examples. This is certainly a super HY topic for all the USMLEs! https://divineinterventionpodcasts.files.wordpress.com/2023/02/episode-439-agma-…
 
How did Britain become a global superpower? Historian and classicist Ian Morris thinks geography has a lot to do with it. Prof. Morris discusses his latest book, Geography is Destiny: Britain and the World: A 10,000 Year History (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2022) which traces the long history of Britain's complex relationship with the European conti…
 
In the United States, unjust disparities in things like income, opportunity, health, safety, and education tightly track racial categorizations of the US population. An intuitive approach to social justice calls us to look to the sites of the greatest disadvantage, and take measures aimed at relieving them. This approach favors “race specific” poli…
 
We live in an urban age. It is well-known that urbanization is changing landscapes, built environments, social infrastructures and everyday lives across the globe. But urbanization is also changing the ways we understand and practise politics. What implications does this have for democracy? This incisive book argues that urbanization undermines est…
 
In the United States, unjust disparities in things like income, opportunity, health, safety, and education tightly track racial categorizations of the US population. An intuitive approach to social justice calls us to look to the sites of the greatest disadvantage, and take measures aimed at relieving them. This approach favors “race specific” poli…
 
Historian Richard John, professor of journalism at Columbia University, talks about his book, Network Nation: Inventing American Telecommunications, with Peoples & Things host, Lee Vinsel. Network Nation is a history of the telegraph and telephone in the United States, and one of its key findings is that, from the very beginning of these technologi…
 
We speak with Dr. W. Curt LaFrance Jr. about functional (nonepileptic) seizures. We cover epidemiology, overlap and differences with regard to epilepsy, negative health outcomes, co-occurring psychological and neurological factors, an etiological framework, cognitive profiles, and treatment. We also discuss general overlap across neurology and psyc…
 
Jeff reviews the 2022 Cold War Aviation film, Devotion, starring Jonathan Majors and Glen Powell and Directed by JD Dillard. Jeff Discusses why he choose the film, the Cold War Connection, juxtaposes the film with Top Gun Maverick and more.For pictures for this episode and more go to our website at: www.historyofthecoldwarpodcast.com/Want to skip t…
 
In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert chats with Roman Mars, host of the podcast "99% Invisible" about design, podcasting and life in the created world. Plus, they discuss the 2020 book “The 99% Invisible City” by Mars and his co-author Kurt Kohlstedt. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.…
 
In this short podcast, I discuss the 25 hour Step 1 Course which will be taking place on 2/9-11 and 2/13-14 from 3-8 pm MST (5-10 pm EST) on all 5 days via zoom. The course is for individuals taking the USMLE Step 1/COMLEX 1 exam or those taking Step 2/3 (or COMLEX 2/3) with poor basic science foundations. Email me via the website for more details/…
 
When we want something very badly, it can be hard to see warning signs that might be obvious to other people. This week, we revisit a favorite episode from 2021, bringing you two stories about how easy it can be to believe in a false reality — even when the facts don’t back us up. If you missed it, make sure to listen to last week's episode on how …
 
Welcome to Awesome Etiquette, where we explore modern etiquette through the lens of consideration, respect and honesty. On today’s show, we take your questions on guests exploring your home on their own, dealing with tension between clients as a dog behavior consultant, foreign language etiquette, and inviting child-free friends to kids birthday pa…
 
This week, Matt goes deeper into the relationship between sleep and exercise. More specifically, does daytime exercise change the stages and types of sleep? Deep sleep is critical for various functions, so anything that can increase it is desirable. Older adults have an inherently difficult time generating deep non-REM sleep; however, a study showe…
 
Angela Vanhaelen's The Moving Statues of Seventeenth-Century Amsterdam: Automata, Waxworks, Fountains, Labyrinths (Penn State University Press, 2022) opens a window onto a fascinating and understudied aspect of the visual, material, intellectual, and cultural history of seventeenth-century Amsterdam: the role played by its inns and taverns, specifi…
 
For many residents of Western nations, COVID-19 was the first time they experienced the effects of an uncontrolled epidemic. This is in part due to a series of little-known regulations that have aimed to protect the global north from epidemic threats for the last two centuries, starting with International Sanitary Conferences in 1851 and culminatin…
 
Hannah Zeavin, lecturer in the department of History and member of the executive committees of both the Center for New Media and the Center for Science, Technology, Medicine, and Society at University of California, Berkeley, talks about her book, The Distance Cure: A History of Teletherapy, with Peoples & Things host, Lee Vinsel. The book tracks t…
 
This week, RBI director John Torpey interviews Prof. Enrique Desmond Arias, a professor of political science at Baruch College and the Graduate Center, about recent developments in Latin American politics. Arias delves into Peru's recent political unrest and how it resembles the times of Fujimori's authoritarianism and discusses the origins of pola…
 
Welcome to the Social-Engineer Podcast: The SE Etc. Series. This series will be hosted by Chris Hadnagy, CEO of Social-Engineer LLC, and The Innocent Lives Foundation, as well as Social-Engineer.Org and The Institute for Social Engineering. Chris will be joined by his co-host Patrick Laverty as they discuss topics pertaining to the world of Social …
 
As I slowly settle into 2023 — reflecting on the blur that was 2022 — I can’t help but think about the complex problems (aka big messes!) we face at every turn: from increasingly devastating manifestations of the climate emergency, to the ubiquitous homelessness crisis, to the perplexing challenge of accessing a family physician in prosperous regio…
 
As I slowly settle into 2023 — reflecting on the blur that was 2022 — I can’t help but think about the complex problems (aka big messes!) we face at every turn: from increasingly devastating manifestations of the climate emergency, to the ubiquitous homelessness crisis, to the perplexing challenge of accessing a family physician in prosperous regio…
 
Patrick McCray, Professor of History at University of California, Santa Barbara, talks about his book, Making Art Work: How Cold War Engineers and Artists Forged a New Creative Culture, with Peoples & Things host, Lee Vinsel. The book shows how artists eagerly collaborated with engineers and scientists to explore new technologies and create visuall…
 
What kind of country is America? Zachary Shore tackles this polarizing question by spotlighting some of the most morally muddled matters of WWII. Should Japanese Americans be moved from the west coast to prevent sabotage? Should the German people be made to starve as punishment for launching the war? Should America drop atomic bombs to break Japan'…
 
To sail down a river of lava in a boat is surely a thing of pure fantasy, but in this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert and Joe discuss the actual “lava boats” you might glimpse in volcanic footage as well as what would be required to build a vessel capable of traversing a true lake of fire. (originally published 02/24/2022) See omnystudio…
 
Linking morality and science can conjure up disturbing histories around social Darwinism, eugenics, and genetically engineered humans. But scientists today are making discoveries that moral agents shouldn’t ignore: how to overcome aggression and tribalism, and how to sustain cooperation in a modern pluralist world. Guests: Diane Paul, professor eme…
 
Microchips are both important and in short supply. So how important? And what can be done to make them more plentiful? Also, what are the geopolitical implications of having the production of microchips concentrated in relatively few hands. Owen Bennett Jones talks microchips with Julian Kamasa of the Centre for Security Studies in Zurich. Owen Ben…
 
Microchips are both important and in short supply. So how important? And what can be done to make them more plentiful? Also, what are the geopolitical implications of having the production of microchips concentrated in relatively few hands. Owen Bennett Jones talks microchips with Julian Kamasa of the Centre for Security Studies in Zurich. Owen Ben…
 
In Wild Music: Sound and Sovereignty in Ukraine (Wesleyan UP, 2019), Maria Sonevytsky tracks vernacular Ukrainian discourses of “wildness” as they manifested in popular music during a volatile decade of Ukrainian political history bracketed by two revolutions. From the Eurovision Song Contest to reality TV, from Indigenous radio to the revolution s…
 
The China Nexus: Thirty Years In and Around the Chinese Communist Party's Tyranny (Optimum Publishing, 2022) brings together Benedict Rogers' 30 years of advocacy, research and work in and around China. Opening with his rollicking adventures as an 18 year old teaching English in Qingdao in 1992, the human element of this monograph, the real people …
 
Microchips are both important and in short supply. So how important? And what can be done to make them more plentiful? Also, what are the geopolitical implications of having the production of microchips concentrated in relatively few hands. Owen Bennett Jones talks microchips with Julian Kamasa of the Centre for Security Studies in Zurich. Owen Ben…
 
It all started with a photograph. A photograph from 1991 of a prison takeover in rural Alabama. A photograph of a group of men on the roof of that prison holding a bedsheet scrawled with a message: "Pray for us." In the first episode of the new season of White Lies, hosts Chip Brantley and Andrew Beck Grace go searching for answers to the questions…
 
Your phone may be a spy in your pocket. Users around the world are being hacked, everywhere they go, by a cyber-surveillance system called Pegasus. We cover the story of a group of brave journalists that shine a light on this dark world of cyber espionage. Then for our Plus+ listeners we discuss the astral band of helpers, spirit chemistry, the thr…
 
In our last episode, we talked about how stress and discomfort aren’t always negative. Sometimes you can harness your energy by learning to reframe the negative feelings, but how do we do that? In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman, Dr. Bob Duke, and Rebecca McInroy talk about the process of reframing stressful situations and wh…
 
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