show episodes
 
Home to the world's largest collection of Shakespeare materials. Advancing knowledge and the arts. Discover it all at www.folger.edu. Shakespeare turns up in the most interesting places—not just literature and the stage, but science and social history as well. Our "Shakespeare Unlimited" podcast explores the fascinating and varied connections between Shakespeare, his works, and the world around us.
 
The Play's the Thing is the ultimate podcast resource for lovers of Shakespeare. Dedicating six episodes to each play (one per act, plus a Q&A episode), this podcast explores the themes, scenes, characters, and lines that make Shakespeare so memorable. In the end, we will cover every play The Bard wrote, thus permitting an ongoing contemplation and celebration of the most important writer of all time. Join us. The Play’s the Thing is presented by The CiRCE Podcast Network. See acast.com/priv ...
 
Was the name signed to the world's most famous plays and poems a pseudonym? Was the man from Stratford that history attributed the work to even capable of writing them? Who was Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, and is there any chance he was the actual author of those legendary works? Who WAS the writer behind the pen name "William Shakespeare?" Join Steven Sabel of the Shakespeare Oxford Fellowship as he and his fellow Oxfordians set out to answer all of those questions and many more on ...
 
From the earliest drama in English, to the closing of the theatres in 1642, there was a hell of a lot of drama produced - and a lot of it wasn't by Shakespeare. Apart from a few noble exceptions these plays are often passed over, ignored or simply unknown. This podcast presents full audio productions of the plays, fragmentary and extant, that shaped the theatrical world that shaped our dramatic history.
 
William Shakespeare (April 26, 1564 – April 23, 1616) remains widely to be considered the single greatest playwright of all time. He wrote in such a variety of genres - tragedy, comedy, romance, &c - that there is always at least one monologue in each of his plays. Some of these teach a lesson, some simply characterize Shakespeare at his best, some are funny, some sad, but all are very moving. Each monologue will touch everybody differently. Some people will be so moved by a particular monol ...
 
The Daily Poem offers one essential poem each weekday morning. From Shakespeare and John Donne to Robert Frost and E..E Cummings, The Daily Poem curates a broad and generous audio anthology of the best poetry ever written, read-aloud by David Kern and an assortment of various contributors. Some lite commentary is included and the shorter poems are often read twice, as time permits. The Daily Poem is presented by Goldberry Studios. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
The high-art low-brow minds behind Bloomsday Literary bring you interviews with the creatives you should know, but don’t. Poets, novelists, memoirists, & short story writers join co-hosts Kate and Jessica as they take a respectful approach to investigating the writer’s art and an irreverent approach to getting the nitty-gritty on the hustle for publication and exposure. Most of us writers making a living by the pen occupy somewhere between the ubiquitous bestsellers and the people who want t ...
 
Better than Shakespeare is a podcast dedicated to socialist theatre. Each week we discuss a different play relevant to socialist struggle in its aesthetic, historical, and theoretical context. There are also jokes. The core team is Andy Boyd and Danny Erickson, but we also have a rotating roster of stellar guests from the worlds of theatre and socialism and socialist theatre.
 
In this podcast we will read and discuss all of William Shakespeare’s plays over the course of a year, starting and ending on the Bard’s birthday. Together we’ll explore the big questions the plays put on the table and the poetry that makes those questions so human. Along the way we’ll be joined by poets, scholars, playwrights, and actors who can help us celebrate the poet whose influence continues to resound loudest over the Western world. Happy birthday, Shakespeare!
 
R
Rough Magic

1
Rough Magic

Seattle Shakespeare Company

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Rough Magic is Seattle Shakespeare Company’s podcast exploring ideas, stories, and interviews related to the world of theatre…specifically classical theatre.The format may change and emerge as the program grows. Some weeks we’ll feature a series exploring a specific theme or topic, other times we might present an original audio story that drew inspiration from Shakespeare. Or, we might just check in with artists to get their thoughts on a play, a role, or a dream project. The canvas is wide ...
 
Generally considered one of Shakespeare's problem plays, Measure for Measure examines the ideas of sin and justice. Duke Vincentio turns Vienna's rule over to the corrupt Angelo, who sentences Claudio to death for having impregnated a woman before marriage. His sister Isabella, a novice nun, pleads for her brother's life, only to be told that he will be spared if she agrees to relinquish her virginity to Angelo. (Summary by wildemoose) Cast: Abhorson: John D. Nugent Angelo: Roger Clifton Bar ...
 
This is the second LibriVox collection of scenes from Shakespeare's plays, mainly comprising dialogues between two characters. The theme for this collection is "Women's Worlds," as the excerpts are all scenes between female characters. (Summary by Elizabeth Klett) Coriolanus, Act 1 Scene 3 read by: Duan, Martin Geeson, Caprisha Page Love's Labor's Lost, Act 5 Scene 2 read by: Duan, Amanda Friday, Elizabeth Klett, Caprisha Page Much Ado About Nothing, Act 3 Scene 1 read by: Verity Kendall, Am ...
 
After the turmoil and uncertainty of Henry IV a new era appears to dawn for England with the accession of the eponymous Henry V. In this sunny pageant Chorus guides us along Henry's glittering carpet ride of success as the new king completes his transformation from rebellious wastrel to a truly regal potentate. Of course, there is an underlying feeling that the good times won't last, and this is all the more reason to enjoy the Indian summer before the protracted and bitter fall of the house ...
 
Shakespeare's Sonnets, or simply The Sonnets, comprise a collection of 154 poems in sonnet form written by William Shakespeare that deal with such themes as love, beauty, politics, and mortality. The poems were probably written over a period of several years. (Summary from wikipedia)
 
Featuring interviews with both actors and academics, Shakespeare’s Shadows delves into a single Shakespeare character in each episode. Perspectives from the worlds of academia, theater, and film together shape explorations of the Bard’s shadows, his imitations of life — pretty good imitations, ones that reveal enough of ourselves that we’re still talking about them four centuries later.
 
Packed with trivia, comedy and celebrity guests, Ask Me Another is like an amusement park for your brain. Host Ophira Eisenberg and musician Jonathan Coulton take brilliant contestants on a roller coaster that'll make you laugh and scream (out the answers)—and barely anyone throws up in a trash can.
 
Serial killers. Gangsters. Gunslingers. Victorian-era murderers. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. Each week, the Most Notorious podcast features true-life tales of crime, criminals, tragedies and disasters throughout history. This is an interview show, spotlighting authors and historians who have studied their subjects for years, and whose stories are offered with unique insight, detail, and historical accuracy.
 
Recorded live from our bookshop, in the heart of Paris, conversations and readings with internationally acclaimed authors. Discover exciting new fiction, non-fiction and poetry, and delve into our archives for events with Zadie Smith, Eddie Izzard, Don DeLillo, Rebecca Solnit, Karl Ove Knausgaard, Dave Eggers, Rachel Cusk, Marlon James, Edouard Louis, Sara Pascoe, Richard Powers, Sally Rooney and many, many more. Hosted by Adam Biles.
 
Loading …
show series
 
You may have heard of common superstitions like throwing salt over your shoulder when you spill some to ward off bad luck, or crossing your fingers when you tell a lie to prevent consequences of your transgression. These kinds of small acts to try and control or influence the spiritual realm around you were more than just common superstitions for t…
 
Chess Pieces: Exploring A Game at Chess by Thomas Middleton, part 1. Welcome to a series of podcasts looking at A Game at Chess by Thomas Middleton, specifically asking questions as to how to produce it a. as a full cast audio adaptation and b. as a live stage show in miniature and in full. This session covers the problems of exposition in the open…
 
Shakespeare has been an obsession of extremist groups across the globe over the centuries. The Nazi Party held him up as a hero, while Osama Bin Laden condemned him as the ultimate symbol of the depraved west. Islam Issa speaks to Rhiannon Davies about the playwright’s tangled relationship with terror. (Ad) Islam Issa is the author of Shakespeare a…
 
Lights!! Costumes!! Set!! Props!! Sound!! Camera!! Action!! Although when Shakespeare was around, his productions would have had none of the above - except cobbled costumes and props from each actor's trunk. However, we believe that if Will came back today, he'd be like "Fuck, yeah!! Use whatever you got!!" That being said, this episode looks at Sh…
 
This week Adam is joined by poets Richard Barnett and Luke Kennard. Richard Barnet’s WHEREVER WE ARE WHEN WE COME TO THE END is an imagining of the experience of the young Ludwig Wittgenstein in the First World War, recounted in the same austere and succinct statements as the philosopher’s Tractatus Logico Philosophicus, the initial notes for which…
 
Steven is flying solo this week to share his personal progression as an Oxfordian, from his first introduction to the Shakespeare Authorship Question as teenager, to his progression as a proponent of the belief that the secret to the mystery lies in the question of the succession of the English throne. He touches on his personal milestones, the boo…
 
In recognition of the National Day of Mourning/Thanksgiving holiday in the United States, we are exploring how the "Age of Exploration" and Colonial Imagination in Early Modern England influenced Shakespeare's works--specifically The Tempest. Shakespeare Anyone? is created and produced by Korey Leigh Smith and Elyse Sharp. Music is "Neverending Min…
 
Many of us have holiday traditions: we trim trees, spin dreidels, trick-or-treat, set off fireworks, and host parties. People had holiday traditions in Shakespeare’s time too: they crossdressed, roleplayed, acted in amateur theatricals, fought, ate pancakes, and watched cockfights. If you’re thinking some of those holiday traditions sound familiar …
 
Th' expense of spirit in a waste of shame Is lust in action, and till action, lust Is perjur'd, murd'rous, bloody, full of blame, Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust, Enjoy'd no sooner but despised straight, Past reason hunted, and no sooner had, Past reason hated as a swallowed bait On purpose laid to make the taker mad: Mad in pursuit and …
 
Step aside, Billy Shakes — it’s your buddy J. Fletch’s day to shine! This week we’re washing out the bad taste the Taming left in our mouths with John Fletcher’s semi-sequel THE WOMAN’S PRIZE aka THE TAMER TAMED. We detour to 80s British children’s TV stars, Bill & Ted, and Chumbawumba. Did Fletcher really do it better? Listen to find out! Content …
 
Amanda Niehaus has a PhD in Physiological Ecology. She is the author of numerous award-winning short stories, essays, and an acclaimed novel, The Breeding Season (Allen & Unwin, 2019). As part of her author profile (bestill our science-loving hearts) she writes: “Does science belong in literary fiction? As a scientist, I never thought so. But ficti…
 
Religion is always a touchy subject, but for most of the world today it's not nearly as dangerous a point of discussion as it was during Shakespeare's lifetime. Protestant and Catholic debates hadn't just destroyed previously unassailable assumptions on articles of faith, they'd led to war, religious persecution to the point of murder, and constant…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2021 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login