show episodes
 
Science, pop culture and comedy collide on StarTalk Radio! Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe. Keep Looking Up! New episodes premiere Monday nights at 7pm ET.
 
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Astronomy Cast

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Astronomy Cast

Fraser Cain and Dr. Pamela Gay

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Take a fact-based journey through the cosmos. Tune in to hear weekly discussions on astronomical topics ranging from planets to cosmology. Hosted by Fraser Cain (Universe Today) and Dr. Pamela L. Gay (Planetary Science Institute), this show brings the questions of an avid astronomy lover direct to an astronomer. Together Fraser and Pamela explore what is known and being discovered about the universe around us. Astronomy Cast is supported thru patreon.com/AstronomyCast.
 
Planetary Radio brings you the human adventure across our solar system and beyond. We visit each week with the scientists, engineers, leaders, advocates and astronauts who are taking us across the final frontier. Regular features raise your space IQ while they put a smile on your face. Join host Mat Kaplan and Planetary Society colleagues including Bill Nye the Science Guy, Bruce Betts, and Emily Lakdawalla as they dive deep into the latest space news. The monthly Space Policy Edition takes ...
 
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Freakonomics Radio

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Freakonomics Radio

Freakonomics Radio + Stitcher

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Discover the hidden side of everything with Stephen J. Dubner, co-author of the Freakonomics books. Each week, Freakonomics Radio tells you things you always thought you knew (but didn’t) and things you never thought you wanted to know (but do) — from the economics of sleep to how to become great at just about anything. Dubner speaks with Nobel laureates and provocateurs, intellectuals and entrepreneurs, and various other underachievers.
 
Host Moxie LaBouche brings you a weekly half-hour of things you didn't know, things you thought you knew, and things you never knew you never knew. Topics range from the history of nursing to the Balinese funeral rite David Bowie requested, from the origin of the Vulcan salute to the theft of Canada's strategic maple syrup reserve. This is your brain on facts. yourbrainonfacts.com
 
Weekly reading of National Geographic Magazine produced by Radio Eye under the Chafee Amendment to the Copyright Act which states that authorized entities that are governmental or nonprofit organizations whose primary mission is to provide copyrighted works in specialized formats to blind or disabled people. By continuing to listen, you verify you have an eligible print-reading disability.
 
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Outside/In

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Outside/In

New Hampshire Public Radio

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A show about the natural world and how we use it. We explore science, energy, environmentalism, and reflections on how we think about and depict nature, and always leave time for plenty of goofing off. Outside/In is a production of New Hampshire Public Radio. Learn more at outsideinradio.org
 
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Civics 101

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Civics 101

New Hampshire Public Radio

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What's the difference between the House and the Senate? How do congressional investigations work? What is Federalist X actually about? Civics 101 is the podcast refresher course on the basics of how our democracy works.
 
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show series
 
With Mat Kaplan in London for Planetary Radio Live, we bring back one of the most moving events in the history of our show. The Cassini orbiter plunged into Saturn in the early hours of September 15, 2017. Hundreds gathered to mark the end of this remarkable voyage, including former NASA chief scientists Jim Green, John Grunsfeld and Ellen Stofan. …
 
Is Western science always the best science? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Marcia Belsky discuss Indigenous methods to combat climate change with Indigenous scientist and author Dr. Jessica Hernandez. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Thanks to our Patrons Jennifer E Carr, Ru…
 
Do you have a favourite place that’s been affected by the extreme weather that’s hit Australia over these past couple of years?This week on Ockham's Razor we’re hearing from Barbara Norman, who has her own special place that’s been hit hard by climate change.But luckily, Barbara is an expert in urban and regional planning, and she has ideas on how …
 
What are stars made of? How do ants breathe? How does a person catch chickenpox? Why are sunsets and sunrises red? What are planets made of? How many bones in a human body? How do Earthquakes occur? IF the Earth's round, why don't we fall off? Why doesn't sand dissolve? How does a bird fly? This week Lester and Dr Chris are with the kids at the AKA…
 
Nobel memorial prize winner Daniel Kahneman is one of the world’s most famous psychologists, known particularly for his work identifying the role of cognitive bias in everyday decision making. In this edition of More or Less he talks to Tim Harford about his latest book, Noise - A Flaw in Human Judgement, in which he outlines how a multitude of oft…
 
* Black hole images allow theories to be tested* Journals slow to act despite evidence of scientific fraud or misconduct* Parrots and humans – extreme species with shared behaviours* New technology brings new life to exhibits at Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery* Vale Caroline Jones
 
* Black hole images allow theories to be tested* Journals slow to act despite evidence of scientific fraud or misconduct* Parrots and humans – extreme species with shared behaviours* New technology brings new life to exhibits at Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery* Vale Caroline Jones
 
Boeing finally completes a demo mission, scientists grow plants in lunar regolith, NASA will launch a mission to repair and refuel a satellite, space suits are leaking on the ISS again, and more. 00:00 Intro 00:27 Update on the meteor storm on May 31st https://www.universetoday.com/156008/update-on-the-potential-may-31st-tau-herculid-meteor-storm/ …
 
If you go outside with a spade and start digging, the chances are you won't find any gold. You might get lucky or just happen to live in a place where people have been finding gold for centuries. But for the most part, there'll be none. But why is that? Why do metals and minerals show up in some places and not others?It's a question that's been bot…
 
How is CTE different from a concussion? Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O’Reilly discuss concussions and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, with former NFL lineman, Leonard Marshall, and neuroscientist, Heather Berlin, PhD. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Thanks to our Patrons …
 
Two planetary neighbors will get especially neighborly over the next few mornings. They’ll huddle as close as half a degree from each other — less than the width of a pencil held at arm’s length. The planets are low in the eastern sky at dawn. The brighter one is Jupiter, the giant of the solar system. Only the Moon and Venus shine brighter. The ot…
 
This salamander is an unlikely but agile, aerial amphibian; Headbutting animals can accumulate brain damage; We can use the cables that carry the internet as environmental sensors; Plants that can survive extreme conditions could help us engineer more resilient crops; What we lose as we lose most of the world’s sharks; How do marine mammals surface…
 
Original broadcast date: February 5, 2021. We live in an era of instant gratification. But some things--to reach their full potential--simply cannot be rushed. This hour, TED speakers explore what we can learn from ideas ... that take time. Guests include zoologist Lucy Cooke, neuroscientist Matthew Walker, architect Julia Watson, and NASA engineer…
 
What is in the This Week in Science Podcast? This Week: AI Updates Theory, Living with dogs, Termite Travels, Gliding Salamanders, Aging Cells Go Placental, Jackdaw Coordination, Diabetic COVID Susceptibility, Not More Severe, Vaccination & Long COVID, Dolphins pee pals, Sea turtles need shades, Corvid Smarts, Comparing Sleeping Brains, And Much Mo…
 
It’s that time again, when scientists everywhere hold their breath as we open our listener mailbag. It’s spring in the northern hemisphere, so the theme of the questions in this episode is “growth” — with the exception of the last question, which is… kind of the opposite. Question 1: Um, what are those frogs doing? (go to our website to see the pic…
 
This week, we begin with a disturbing medical mystery. Since the start of the year, almost 200 children worldwide have fallen ill with hepatitis—or liver inflammation—without any apparent cause. Most of the children are under five, and nearly half of the cases were in the UK. Vic Gill asks clinical epidemiologist Deepti Gurdasani, Queen Mary Univer…
 
Take a look down the aisle of any high street chemist and the array of electric toothbrushes on offer is as dazzling as the teeth they promise to give you. You can pay upto £500 for the latest versions whiose myriad features include interactive apps that give you feedback on your brushing technique.The market is dominated by two big brands, both pr…
 
In this program we explore an ambitious science project aimed at to documenting the genomes of all known creatures; we'll hear why the future of the Anglican church is female; and explore the latest research into public perceptions of facial recognition technology.
 
Dr Chris Smith and the Naked Scientist team look at the warning signs of bowel cancer, whether the so-called “runners high” exists, and following claims of war crimes committed by Vladimir Putin's forces in Ukraine how forensic archaeologists can help uncover evidence of what’s happened.This episodes looks in detail at how forensic investigators ex…
 
Plutocratic London and dynastic wealth. Caroline Knowles, Professor of Sociology at Goldsmiths, University of London, takes Laurie Taylor on a tour of plutocratic London, a city with more resident billionaires than New York, Hong Kong or Moscow. How have the fabulously rich re-made London in their own image and what is the cost to ordinary Londoner…
 
Many of today’s biggest songs are written and produced by people whose names don’t appear anywhere in the credits. They’re called ghostwriters and ghost producers, and they’re a huge part of the music industry. So what’s it like to watch your song become a hit when you can’t legally talk about it? And how do you get in the mindset of a legendary ra…
 
Some recent, and surprising, estimates from the World Health Organisation suggested that the UK fared better than Germany in the pandemic. But did they get it right?At Eurovision this year an algorithm was apparently used to replace whole countries’ votes - was it responsible for the UK’s second-place finish?The global economy has been putting the …
 
We’re shaking things up today and sharing a preview from Car Show!, a new podcast from our friends at Pushkin Industries. Longtime Car and Driver editor Eddie Alterman tells the stories of the vital cars — the ones that have changed how we drive and live, whose significance lies outside the scope of horsepower or miles per gallon. In this episode, …
 
Claudia Hammond reports on a trend which has emerged from the world-famous Chelsea Flower Show this year - a growing number of gardens designed with mental health in mind. So what is it about gardens and nature which makes us feel better? The Mothers for Mothers "This Too Shall Pass" garden is designed by Polly Wilkinson - a former counsellor who's…
 
In this week's Questions and Answers show, I explain what James Webb will see when it looks at SgrA*, why black holes happen to be facing towards us, and if asteroid strikes can hurl dinosaurs into space. 00:00 Start 00:59 [Tatooine] Will Webb look at SgrA*? 05:23 [Coruscant] Why are both black holes facing us? 07:16 [Hoth] Were dinosaurs hurled to…
 
It's said that the environment is the silent victim of war. In this programme, Tom Heap finds out how the conflict in Ukraine is affecting environmental work in the country. With so many people forced to flee, what happens to projects which were trying to protect fragile wildlife habitats? He talks to an award-winning Ukrainian environmentalist who…
 
The Relic Radio Show begins with Have Gun, Will Travel this week. We hear In An Evil Time, their broadcast from May 24, 1959. (24:43) Our second story is The Story Of Ivy, the June 21, 1945, episode of Suspense. https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/archive.org/download/rr22021/RelicRadio790.mp3 Download RelicRadio790 Support our fifteenth year …
 
The federal judiciary system has three steps: district court, circuit court, and the Supreme Court, and despite what you see on screen, many cases do not end with that first courtroom verdict. This is how the federal judiciary system works, what makes a case worthy of consideration by the Supreme Court, and what happens when case lands in front of …
 
Chi Onwurah tells Jim Al-Khalili why she wanted to become a telecoms engineer and why engineering is a caring profession. As a black, working class woman from a council estate in Newcastle, she was in a minority of one studying engineering at university in London and encountered terrible racism and sexism. She went on to build digital networks all …
 
How did rubber ducks go from lumps of rubber that didn't even float to a cheerful childhood staple? Let's look at where they came from, where they're going, and why they keep showing up at violent political protests. 1-star review shirt! and shirt raising money for Ukraine Red Cross 00:38 Bit of backstory 07:13 Bert's best buddy 10:25 Review, patro…
 
How do you identify human remains? Neil deGrasse Tyson and Chuck Nice explore DNA and the task to identify the remains of missing soldiers with biomedical scientist Tim McMahon and forensic anthropologist Franklin Damann. What is the DPAA? NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia…
 
Space flight is hard on the human body. Astronauts lose muscle mass and bone density. They’re exposed to radiation that increases the risk of cancer and other problems. And that’s just the beginning. Long flights aboard the International Space Station have led to changes in the eyes, blood, and brain. Most astronauts who’ve spent at least six month…
 
The warmer weather is here and, with it, solar energy is on my mind. Sun-thing tells me I'm into something good. Join us in the first of our series of programmes on renewable energy sources as the world faces a difficult energy challenge and the threat of an 'apocalyptic' food shortage crisis. We'll be speaking to some of the players, big and small…
 
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