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Best Science Podcasts We Could Find
Best Science Podcasts We Could Find
People's thirst for knowledge and exploring the unknown is responsible for the development of our civilisation. New breakthroughs are announced on a daily basis and new planets are discovered, which might be difficult to follow. Podcasts can help you expand your gray matter and learn new facts, regardless of how busy you are as they are portable, easy to follow from any location, most of them free. Thanks to podcasts, people can fetch the latest science news and be among the first ones to find out about the latest breakthroughs, planets, and the latest research results. In this catalog you can find podcasts which cover all aspects of science, ranging from the tiniest microbes in our bodies to the outer reaches of space. There are podcasts where people can learn more about the mysteries which still puzzle us all, accompanied by people who devote their lives to solving them. Some podcasts cover interviews with the world's top scientists, answers to people's science questions and offer safe science experiments to try at home.
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Science, pop culture and comedy collide on StarTalk Radio! Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe. Keep Looking Up! New episodes premiere Monday nights at 7pm ET.
 
The Data Skeptic Podcast features interviews and discussion of topics related to data science, statistics, machine learning, artificial intelligence and the like, all from the perspective of applying critical thinking and the scientific method to evaluate the veracity of claims and efficacy of approaches.
 
Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin and Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here: theguardian.com/covid19questions
 
Radiolab is one of the most beloved podcasts and public radio shows in the world. The show is known for its deep-dive journalism and innovative sound design. Created in 2002 by host Jad Abumrad, the program began as an exploration of scientific inquiry. Over the years it has evolved to become a platform for long-form journalism and storytelling. Radiolab is co-hosted by Lulu Miller and Latif Nasser.
 
New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join host Maddie Sofia for science on a different wavelength.
 
What if Dear Abby was an investigative reporter? Each week on How To!, David Epstein (bestselling author of Range and The Sports Gene)) takes on listeners’ toughest problems and, with the help of experts, finds the answers to questions you’ve always wanted to ask, but couldn’t. Until now.
 
Every weekday, TED Talks Daily brings you the latest talks in audio. Join host and journalist Elise Hu for thought-provoking ideas on every subject imaginable — from Artificial Intelligence to Zoology, and everything in between — given by the world's leading thinkers and creators. With TED Talks Daily, find some space in your day to change your perspectives, ignite your curiosity, and learn something new.
 
They are natural-born-leaders with a never-ending thirst for power. Through force and deceit, they rise through the ranks towards radicalism—eliminating anyone who stands in their way. Every Tuesday, delve into the minds, and motives, behind some of the world’s most infamous leaders in Parcast’s original series, DICTATORS. Each dictator is analyzed in 2-part episodes...with the first giving insight into their rise to power, and the second chronicling the impact of their downfall.
 
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Dr Chris Smith and the Naked Scientists with science news stories. Including a look at whether we are seeing the beginning of the end of the Covid pandemic, as cases fall. Plus tips for athletes coping with extreme temperatures at the Tokyo Olympic Games, and the team go behind the scenes at the Royal Society’s “Summer Science” exhibition which has…
 
Do rocks found in Canada show animal life 350 million years older than any found before? And, delving to the core of Mars, the guts of cats, and into the life of Steven Weinberg. Prof Elizabeth Turner of Canada's Laurentian University reports in the journal Nature structures in some of the oldest sedimentary rocks that resemble the residue left by …
 
Building on the previous discussion of Hartree-Fock Theory, I discuss the inclusion of basis functions to produce the Roothaan equations, and the method of solving these using self-consistent field methods. I then provide an introduction into techniques to incorporate electron correlation by adding Slater determinants, focusing on the Configuration…
 
Getting To Know The Fungus Among Us (In Our Guts) Your gut microbiome is composed of more than bacteria—a less populous, but still important, resident is fungi. Many people’s lower digestive tract is home to the yeast Candida albicans, the species implicated in vaginal yeast infections and oral thrush. But new research published in the scientific j…
 
Do rocks found in Canada show animal life 350 million years older than any found before?And, delving to the core of Mars, the guts of cats, and into the life of Steven Weinberg.Prof Elizabeth Turner of Canada's Laurentian University reports in the journal Nature structures in some of the oldest sedimentary rocks that resemble the residue left by sp…
 
First this week, Staff Writer Jennifer Couzin-Frankel joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the paradox of metabolically healthy obesity. They chat about the latest research into the relationships between markers of metabolic health—such as glucose or cholesterol levels in the blood—and obesity. They aren’t as tied as you might think.Next, Colin Dayan…
 
In the UK we have seen a recent fall in Covid 19 cases. Good news, but we don’t know yet if this will be sustained. The virus is now thought to be spreading predominantly amongst the under 30s, most of whom remain unvaccinated. Young adults are the demographic most likely to be vaccine hesitant or vaccine averse. Kavita Vedhara from Nottingham Univ…
 
Genetic advantages in sport tend to be celebrated, but that isn’t always the case when it comes to women’s athletics. At the start of July, two female runners from Namibia, Christine Mboma and Beatrice Masilingi, were told they couldn’t compete in the 400m race in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics unless they reduced their naturally high testosterone hormone…
 
AI research is often framed as a kind of human-versus-machine rivalry that will inevitably lead to the defeat — and even wholesale replacement of — human beings by artificial superintelligences that have their own sense of agency, and their own goals. Divya Siddarth disagrees with this framing. Instead, she argues, this perspective leads us to focu…
 
Why are billionaires racing for space? What is the UK's Covid-19 strategy since freedom day? And how will Covid-19 affect the Olympics? This week it's QnA time, and with us to explore where weightlessness begins, whether animals other than mammals suckle their young, if recent findings of methane mean life on Mars, and why the UK isn't vaccinating …
 
As a kid, Jasmin Graham was endlessly curious about the ocean. Her constant questioning eventually led her to a career in marine science studying sharks and rays. But until relatively recently, she had never met another Black woman in her field. That all changed last year when she connected with a group of Black women studying sharks through the Tw…
 
In this episode, we explore how a small native seed company selling native plant seeds out of their living room grew into one of the biggest native plant nurseries in the United States. Joining us is Horticulture Educator Kaitlyn O'Connor to give us a deep dive into how Prairie Moon Nursery is able to provide over 700 species of native plants for u…
 
Kiran joins TWiV to discuss the findings of a team at Columbia University Medical Center on COVID-19 neuropathology, and the conclusion that SARS-CoV-2 does not reproduce in the central nervous system. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Rich Condit, and Brianne Barker Guest: Kiran Thakur Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, e…
 
Whatever happened to those sniffer dogs who were seeking out any passengers infected with Covid-19 at Helsinki airport? And did plans to sample sewage to spot outbreaks early prove successful? This week on The Evidence, we have listeners’ questions about some of the clever ideas which were in the news early on in the pandemic but we haven’t heard a…
 
Every year, police across the U.S. get thousands of criminals to confess to their crimes. The trouble is, the procedure that almost all departments use is grounded in bad science and can produce false confessions. Learn about ways of making you talk in this classic episode. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com…
 
Whether plotting to build a great northern wall or an aircraft carrier made of ice instead of steel, the substance you’re looking for is Pykrete. In this classic episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert and Joe discuss what makes this super-strong ice so durable and why there was an actual plan to build ships out of the stuff during the Second Wo…
 
June saw a brutal heatwave shatter a number of all-time temperature records in Canada and the Northwest of the USA. But when can we attribute new records to man-made climate change, rather than natural variation? Peter Stott, an expert in climate attribution at the UK’s Met Office, explains how climate change has dramatically increased the probabil…
 
In COVID-19 clinical update #73, Daniel Griffin reviews updated mask guidance from CDC, infections in public school district employees, effectiveness of vaccines against delta variant, antibody response after third vaccine dose in kidney transplant recipients, protection afforded by mRNA vaccines fully vaccinated people with and without prior infec…
 
Summary Companies of all sizes and industries are trying to use the data that they and their customers generate to survive and thrive in the modern economy. As a result, they are relying on a constantly growing number of data sources being accessed by an increasingly varied set of users. In order to help data consumers find and understand the data …
 
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. It’s a well-known phrase that we all try and follow in our day to day lives. But are our current recycling habits the best they can be? It’s a hot topic at Crowdscience - multiple listeners have contacted Crowdscience with questions about the ins and outs of recycling. We follow one listener’s food waste to a processing plan…
 
With Delta Rising, New Rules On Masks And Vaccines This week, the CDC released new guidelines for mask use in the U.S., just months after many cities and towns relaxed mask mandates. The guidance says that “to reduce their risk of becoming infected with the Delta variant and potentially spreading it to others: CDC recommends that fully vaccinated p…
 
In honor of National Intern Day, Gravity Assist features Felicia Ragucci, an undergraduate at Dartmouth College who recently completed an internship with NASA’s History Office and the Office of the Chief Scientist. During her time at NASA, Felicia researched the history of the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator, an underwater training facility where astron…
 
Throwing? Jumping? Wrestling? Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O’Reilly break down the physics of some of the original Olympic events with Geek-in-Chief and astrophysicist Charles Liu. Is there an ultimate technique to winning gold? NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://…
 
Creative, sustainable solutions find their home in the thousands of informal neighborhoods across the world. Urban planner Jota Samper believes these often overlooked settlements (also known as slums) should be regarded as hubs of innovation and shares three reasons why giving them the attention they deserve could help change the way humanity coexi…
 
Completed in 1914, the Panama Canal has long been regarded as a triumph of American ingenuity, a conquest over nature that helped secure the United States’ position as a world power. Taking ten years to build, it opened up new trading routes between East and West by providing a vital waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. But what was th…
 
On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention changed its guidance on wearing masks. Short Wave co-host Maddie Sofia and NPR health correspondent Allison Aubrey explain what's changed and why. Plus, the latest on the Delta variant, a highly transmissible strain of the coronavirus. Want to see how widespread COVID-19 is in your local co…
 
TWiVsters review off-season epidemics of respiratory syncytial virus in Australia after easing of COVID-19 restrictions, and impaired innate immune responses in upper respiratory tract cells from patients with severe COVID-19. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Rich Condit, Kathy Spindler, and Brianne Barker Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, …
 
Fire has always been part of California's landscape. But long before the vast blazes of recent years, Native American tribes held controlled burns that cleared out underbrush, encouraged new plant growth, and helped manage wildfires. It's a tradition that disappeared with the arrival of Western settlers. NPR climate correspondent Lauren Sommer expl…
 
Professor Matthew Cobb looks at how genetic engineering became big business - from the first biotech company that produced human insulin in modified bacteria in the late 1970s to the companies like Monsanto which developed and then commercialised the first GM crops in the 1990s. Were the hopes and fears about these products of genetic engineering r…
 
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