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In this episode of our Reflections series, Bill Adair, former director of the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media & Democracy, speaks with 9th Street Journal reporter Julianna Rennie. Rennie describes what she learned about journalism in her years working with the center, and how growing as a journalist also gave her important life skills. Host and pro…
 
According to a recent bipartisan report from the American Enterprise Institute and Brookings Institution, the federal budget inadequately addresses children's needs. After three years of work, the group's consensus outlines a range of budget-neutral policy recommendations. Guests: Michael Strain, the Director of Economic Policy Studies at the Ameri…
 
Ray Starling grew up on a hog and tobacco farm in rural North Carolina. He recalls working on the property by age five. Abdullah Antepli grew up in poverty in a slum in Turkey - his father left school in the fifth grade, and his mother is illiterate. Today, both men live in North Carolina, and their politics could not be more different. Starling le…
 
Large technology companies are so powerful they now threaten democracy. They are too big to sue, and current regulations are not holding them responsible for their actions or outcomes. What can be done when a large tech company is doing something that is harmful to society? How can the technology companies that want to differentiate themselves demo…
 
Very large tech companies fit into a special tech category called “platforms.” Companies like Facebook, Google, Twitter, and Amazon are so big – it’s like they are on a raised on a platform at a country fair, and can be heard all over the fairgrounds. The platform gives them an advantage; because they can be heard by more people, their technology c…
 
It’s critical to understand just how hard it is to tell big tech companies what to do. The United States’ legal system is set up for a fair fight, but in practice tech firms are often able to act as their own judge and jury. They control everything from what apps we see, to what data they collect about us to whether or not misinformation and hate s…
 
In this episode of our Reflections series, host Cameron Oglesby speaks with 9th Street Journal reporter Milla Surjadi about the importance of compassion in courtroom journalistm. Surjadi explores the impact our stories can have on people and discusses how to pursue reporting with both rigor and humanity. Host and producer: Cameron Oglesby Feb. 24, …
 
Russia has invaded Ukraine. In response, President Biden has promised that the U.S. will impose “severe sanctions” against Russia for its actions. But what are sanctions exactly? How do they work? Do they have a history of working? Do they work well? Bruce Jentleson is a former State Department official. He has held numerous senior foreign policy p…
 
COVID-19 has upended lives around the world. Prior to the pandemic, Jennifer Lansford and her colleagues were conducting in-depth. multi-year research on children and families in nine countries. They are now expanding their research to consider COVID-19 and children and parents’ mental health. Jennifer Lansford is a research professor in the Sanfor…
 
In this latest episode of our Reflections series, host Cameron Oglesby speaks with 9th Street reporter Lilly Clark about her experience covering traffic court. Clark highlights the conundrum she faces in covering even small traffic offenses and how the permanence of this digital age in journalism allows stories about mundane criminal offenses to st…
 
Dr. Jim Young Kim is a physician and anthropologist who previously served as the President of the World Bank. As a student at Harvard he co-founded the influential non-profit Partners in Health with Dr. Paul Farmer. Kim has received the MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship and was named one of TIME magazine’s “100 Most Influential People in the World." Dr…
 
Scholars, practitioners, advocates and students gathered recently at Duke University to examine the topic of redistricting, the process of drawing congressional boundaries. The conference included judges and mathematicians, investigative reporters, and more. Each contributed insights to try and untangle the complex web that redistricting had become…
 
In the first podcast of our Reflections series, host Cameron Oglesby interviews 9th Street reporter Grace Abels about her coverage of Durham District Attorney Satana Deberry, who she profiled for Pride Month. Abels discusses intersectionality and how the reporting process helped her to more deeply understand her own intersecting identites and the c…
 
There’s been tremendous political wrangling in the US recently about raising the debt ceiling (how much money we allow ourselves to borrow). The U.S. is not the first country in history borrow money and we won’t be the last. In the late imperial period until the early 1920s, Russia needed cash, and they got it from Britain and France. Owing so much…
 
If you’ve ever opened the New York Times, it’s likely that you’ve read something by Frank Bruni. He worked at the paper for 25 years as metro reporter, White House correspondent, Rome bureau chief, and even the chief restaurant critic for a time. He was also the first openly gay op-ed columnist at the Times. Bruni is now a faculty member at the San…
 
Duke University’s Cyber Policy program has a new report that shows data brokers are openly and explicitly advertising sensitive information about US individuals for sale including demographic information, political preferences, even real-time GPS locations on current and former U.S. military personnel. The authors say such data brokerage is a virtu…
 
Most Americans have no idea that there are elaborate pretend Iraqi and Afghan villages scattered around the United States – on US military bases. The villages are designed to look real. There are people in them - many of the people were born in the Middle East and immigrated to the U.S. They now play pretend versions of themselves, in pretend Middl…
 
What does it take to build a business from the ground up? Are there special challenges that women face? Are there lessons that can be learned from those who have, as they say, been there and done that when it comes to building organizations that matter? Our guest today is Maya Ajmera, who started her first organization, the Global Fund for Children…
 
Throughout history, the U.S. and other countries have paid reparations to a wide range of people and groups, for a variety of wrongs. But reparations to African Americans have not been paid to date. In the final episode of the series The ARC of Justice – From Here to Equality, listen in on a live conversation about reparations. How would the debt b…
 
What role do corporations play in a functioning democracy? Is there a way to encourage companies to be more socially responsible? Guest: Stan Litow is the author of The Challenge for Business and Society: From Risk to Reward. At IBM he led the global corporate social responsibility program. Litow now teaches graduate courses at the Sanford School o…
 
Our guest this episode is part of a team of researchers that used data from real people's social media accounts to build bots that expose people to news they don't agree with – then they measured how users reacted. What they found is that when people are exposed to views that oppose their own, they actually become MORE not LESS polarized. Guest: Ch…
 
Throughout the nation’s history, time and again, promising signs of African American progress have been shattered by acts of violence serving the interests of white supremacy. The extent of that violence is widespread and ongoing. This is the fifth installment of the series "The ARC of Justice - From Here to Equality." Get show notes, credits, tran…
 
Sometimes we know exactly what the consequences of a policy will be, and sometimes we don’t. In this episode, we’ll explore a surprising consequence related to stepped-up enforcement of immigration policy in one county in North Carolina: Mecklenburg County. Guest: Professor Christina Gibson-Davis is Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Sanford …
 
In this episode: The GI Bill was a conveyor belt into the middle class for millions of white WWII veterans, but many African American veterans were excluded. Subsequent generations continue to feel the effects. This is the fourth installment of the series "The ARC of Justice - From Here to Equality." Get show notes, credits, transcript and discussi…
 
In this episode, we look at ways to demystify artificial intelligence (AI) for military commanders and arm military personnel with the right questions to ask to distinguish AI with real, enduring capabilities from so called “drive-by AI.” Guest: Marc Losito is a Master of Public Policy student at the Duke Sanford School of Public Policy, where he i…
 
In this episode: how the federal government promoted housing segregation and thwarted African American home ownership. This is the second installment of the series “The ARC of Justice – From Here to Equality." Get show notes, credits and transcript. Produced with North Carolina Public Radio WUNC. Made possible by the Duke Office for Faculty Advance…
 
A tale of two promises made by the government – one kept, one broken. What happened, and what does this have to do with the existing wealth gap between African Americans and white Americans? This is the second installment of the series “The ARC of Justice – From Here to Equality." Get show notes, credits and transcript. Produced with North Carolina…
 
As Elizabeth Warren memorably wrote, “It is impossible to buy a toaster that has a one-in-five chance of bursting into flames and burning down your house. But it is possible to refinance an existing home with a mortgage that has the same one-in-five chance of putting the family out on the street.” That quotation is an apt introduction to Mallory So…
 
We’re dedicating the entire season of the podcast to this topic: what could have been done, and what could still be done, to start to close the wealth gap between white and Black Americans? The series “The Arc of Justice – From Here to Equality” is inspired by the research of professor William “Sandy” Darity Jr. He has co-written an award-winning b…
 
On January 27, 2021, the Acting Secretary of Homeland Security issued a first-ever National Terrorism Advisory System (NTAS) Bulletin due to a heightened threat environment across the U.S., which DHS believes will persist in the weeks following the Jan. 6 Presidential Inauguration. In a recent guest column in the Tampa Bay Times, Duke Professor Dav…
 
Duke Professor Anne-Maria Makhulu joins Dean Judith Kelley to compare the current racial and socioeconomic disparities of South Africa with the disparities that have been made increasingly apparent over the past decade in the United States. The scholars discuss the countries' similarities and differences with regards to the coronavirus response, re…
 
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