show episodes
 
Imagine yourself dining with Socrates, Plato, or Pythagoras... maybe even Cicero and Julius Caesar...being a soldier marching with Alexander's the Great army in the vast Persian empire discovering new foods... or try and picture the richness of fruits and vegetables in the lush Hanging Gardens of Babylon...what foods did our ancestors ate? How did all begin? Why am I so hooked on ancient recipes and ingredients? Is the food delicious? Wholesome? Do you need to know? I think so! Recipes, ingr ...
 
Marcus Aurelius was a Roman Emperor and philosopher who wrote Meditations; insights which were considered to give the meaning of life. The book was not written with the intent to be published. It offers a noteworthy chain of challenging situations which are a reflection on spirituality and enumerate the struggle to understand oneself and one's role in the universe. Written in the style of a journal, Meditations emphasizes that life in this world is short. Aurelius was a stoic philosopher who ...
 
Pandemics, violent eruptions, city sackings, egomaniac emperors. Sound familiar? History always repeats itself. Archaeologist host Darius Arya Digs goes back 2000 years to uncover elements of Ancient Rome & its expansive Empire. On location from the back streets of Rome to the bazaar of Cairo, from the Agora of Athens to the Medina of Tunis, and from the Vatican Museums to the Roman emperor Diocletian’s palace of Split. Episodes drop each Monday!
 
Welcome to a podcast all about politics, lifestyle, and everyday things you may of not known. There is great knowledge out there it is up to you to seek it.The great Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius once said " I have to go to work, as a human being what do I complain of, if I'm going to do what I was born for. The things I was brought into the world to do". Find your purpose, chase your ambition, tune in as we discuss what is means to be a true stoic.
 
The internet is truly a wild place. One moment you're watching YouTube videos of cats and the next you're on your fourth article about the Industrial Revolution. Join hosts Sydnee Goodman and Kate Franklin as the duo brings their internet musings from the week and inevitably an embarrassing story or two. It'll probably be weird. New episodes Fridays.
 
The history of Christianity is really the history of Western civilization. Christianity has had an all-pervasive influence on society at large—art, language, politics, law, family life, calendar dates, music, and the very way we think have all been colored by Christian influence for nearly two millennia. The story of the church, therefore, is an important one to know. History of Christianity - The Beginning of the Church The church began 50 days after Jesus’ resurrection (c. A.D. 30). Jesus ...
 
From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Plutarch’s Greeks and Romans is a bi-weekly podcast inspired by Plutarch’s ancient collection of biographies of famous Grecians and Romans. Plutarch was both a Greek and a Roman citizen living during the Pax Romana - the Golden Age of the Roman Empire. Our podcast will explore 50 persons Plutarch believed were most influential in the rise of Greek and Roman civilization, from legends such as Theseus and Romulus to conquerors like Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar, Plutarch had no shortag ...
 
Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written sometime between 1603 and 1607. It was first printed in the First Folio of 1623. The plot is based on Thomas North's translation of Plutarch's Life of Marcus Antonius and follows the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony from the time of the Parthian War to Cleopatra's suicide. The major antagonist is Octavius Caesar, one of Antony's fellow triumviri and the future first emperor of Rome. The trag ...
 
On Architecture is a treatise on architecture written by the Roman architect Vitruvius and dedicated to his patron, the emperor Caesar Augustus as a guide for building projects. The work is one of the most important sources of modern knowledge of Roman building methods as well as the planning and design of structures, both large (aqueducts, buildings, baths, harbours) and small (machines, measuring devices, instruments). He is also the prime source of the famous story of Archimedes and his b ...
 
Spanning a period of nearly 1500 years, this monumental work of history tracks the orbit of one of the greatest Empires of all time. The sheer scale and sweep of the narrative is breathtaking in its ambitious scope and brings to vivid life the collapse of a magnificent military, political and administrative structure. Proceeding at a brisk pace, the original fourteen volumes describe debauched emperors, corrupt practices, usurpers and murderers, bloody battles, plunder and loot, barbarian ho ...
 
How and why did ancient Romans use myth to validate their power? Emperor Augustus legitimised his rule by entwining his own ancestry with the mythical stories of Rome's foundation, and created a divine aura around Rome as capital of the vast empire. This album visits key emblems associated with Rome's beginnings: the Forum and the Capitoline Hill with its statue of the she-wolf and Romulus and Remus; the Emperor Augustus's palace and ceremonial altar, and the 17th Century D'Arpino frescos of ...
 
How and why did ancient Romans use myth to validate their power? Emperor Augustus legitimised his rule by entwining his own ancestry with the mythical stories of Rome's foundation, and created a divine aura around Rome as capital of the vast empire. This album visits key emblems associated with Rome's beginnings: the Forum and the Capitoline Hill with its statue of the she-wolf and Romulus and Remus; the Emperor Augustus's palace and ceremonial altar, and the 17th Century D'Arpino frescos of ...
 
How and why did ancient Romans use myth to validate their power? Emperor Augustus legitimised his rule by entwining his own ancestry with the mythical stories of Rome's foundation, and created a divine aura around Rome as capital of the vast empire. This album visits key emblems associated with Rome's beginnings: the Forum and the Capitoline Hill with its statue of the she-wolf and Romulus and Remus; the Emperor Augustus's palace and ceremonial altar, and the 17th Century D'Arpino frescos of ...
 
Host AJ Abdel-Rahman is here to guide you through all of France's (known) history or waste a lot of time trying! Tune in to hear about figures ranging from Vercingetorix to De Gaul and learn why Marie Antoinette *really* got beheaded. Follow us on social media for regular updates, miscellaneous additional content, and whatever else we decide to do. FACEBOOK: facebook.com/francofriendly INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/franco_friendly/ REDDIT: reddit.com/r/FrancoFriendly/
 
Antony and Cleopatra is a tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written sometime between 1603 and 1607. It was first printed in the First Folio of 1623. The plot is based on Thomas North's translation of Plutarch's Life of Marcus Antonius and follows the relationship between Cleopatra and Mark Antony from the time of the Parthian War to Cleopatra's suicide. The major antagonist is Octavius Caesar, one of Antony's fellow triumviri and the future first emperor of Rome. The trag ...
 
Spanning a period of nearly 1500 years, this monumental work of history tracks the orbit of one of the greatest Empires of all time. The sheer scale and sweep of the narrative is breathtaking in its ambitious scope and brings to vivid life the collapse of a magnificent military, political and administrative structure. Proceeding at a brisk pace, the original fourteen volumes describe debauched emperors, corrupt practices, usurpers and murderers, bloody battles, plunder and loot, barbarian ho ...
 
This historical novel is set in Rome in the early 4th century AD, during the time of the cruel persecution of Christians under the Emperor Diocletian.The heroine of the book is Fabiola, a young pagan beauty from a noble Roman family. Fabiola seems to have everything, including a superior education in the philosophers, yet under the surface, she is not content with her life. One day, in a fit of rage, she attacks and wounds her slave girl Syra, who is a secret Christian. The proud, spoiled Ro ...
 
A show for people who are ready to radically transform their lives through the use of The Enneagram, Stoicism, and other personal growth resources. Host Sarah Mikutel, founder of the Stoic Enneagram, shares interviews, stories, and actionable exercises to help you feel more peaceful, enjoy happier relationships, and live a more smoothly flowing life. If you’re stuck in a transition point — you know WHAT you want to change and can’t figure out WHY you can’t move forward — this show is the roa ...
 
The Twelve Caesars is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. The work was written in 121 during the reign of the emperor Hadrian, while Suetonius was Hadrian’s personal secretary. On the Life of the Caesars concentrates on the acts and personalities of the Julio-Claudians and their immediate successors. Together with Tacitus’ Annals, this work is a major source for the historical details in Robert Graves’ novels “I Claudius” and “Claudius ...
 
How and what can we learn from fragments? Thousands of fragmented inscriptions survive from the ancient city of Rome, the majority of which are funerary inscriptions or epitaphs from tombs. This album looks at the impact of funerary monuments. From the Mausoleum of Emperor Augustus, to the more humble tombs of freed slaves, these monuments reveal a great deal about the people and families commemorated. Examining the type, scale, location, decoration, and epitaph of each tomb allows us to bui ...
 
Ab urbe condita, is a monumental history of ancient Rome written in the Latin language by Titus Livius(Livy), an ancient Roman historian. The work covers the time from the stories of Aeneas, the earliest legendary period from before the city's founding in c. 753 BC, to Livy's own times in the reign of the emperor, Augustus. The last year covered by Livy is 745 AUC, or 9 BC, the death of Drusus. About 25% of the work survives.Livy's History of Rome was in demand from the publication of the fi ...
 
History of Rome from the Earliest times down to 476 AD. This compilation is designed to be a companion to the author's History of Greece. It is hoped that it may fill a want, now felt in many high schools and academies, of a short and clear statement of the rise and fall of Rome, with a biography of her chief men, and an outline of her institutions, manners, and religion. (Summary by Tony_Ritcherson)
 
The AIQ podcast (Antiquity in Question) is an academic podcast on the topic of ancient history. It's goal is to combine an academic approach to topics of the ancient world whilst still being interesting and fun for listeners who know little about history. The AIQ podcast covers topics such as the Romans, classical Greece and important figures in history like Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar. You will listen to and be immersed into the fascinating world of Empires, Leaders and the comple ...
 
Apollonius of Tyana (ca. 40-120 AD) was a Greek Pythagorean philosopher and teacher. He hailed from the town of Tyana in the Roman province of Cappadocia in Asia Minor. His date of birth is a matter of conjecture as some say he was roughly a contemporary of Jesus. After Apollonius' death his name remained famous among philosophers and occultists. In a "novelistic invention" inserted in the Historia Augusta, Aurelian, at the siege of Tyana in 272, was said to have experienced a visionary drea ...
 
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show series
 
Enterprise, Alabama is home to a fascinating statue honoring the boll weevil, a tiny creature that once wreaked havoc across cotton country. So what inspired the good people of Enterprise to erect a statue honoring the insect that almost destroyed their town? Learn more in today's episode. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodca…
 
Beau and Carl chat about the mighty Persian army that Xerxes The Great assembled in order to invade Greece during the second Greco-Persian war, the one that includes the battle of Thermopylae. They discuss if the giant figures reported by Herodotus are correct, and if modern scholarship has overcorrected.…
 
Did you know that you could use cinnamon buds as spice in food? Well I didn't either before my interview with Dr Christopher Monk! Is Forme of Cury the oldest complete collection of recipes from England? This book was originally commissioned by Richard II and compiled by his master cooks, with the assent of his physicians and philosophers at court,…
 
With Cimon out of the picture for a while, more democratic figures would step up to fill the leadership vacuum, and Pericles would end up becoming the most prominent of these, eventually establishing a legacy as arguably the greatest statesman in the history of Athens. With Pericles as the lead voice in the Ecclesia, Athens would experience a Golde…
 
Carl and Callum discuss the corporate media's constant lying and use of critical race theory to instigate division, how the EU is scared of memes and the baffling decision to create a Holocaust memorial in a small London park.https://www.lotuseaters.com/the-podcast-of-the-lotus-eaters-187-30-07-21By lotuseaters.com
 
When the Earl of Rundel learned his acquaintance Prince Rupert was languishing in an Austrian prison during the Thirty Years' War, he gifted the prince a rare white hunting poodle as a companion. Rupert named his new pooch "Boy" and the two became inseparable. Boy accompanied Rupert into multiple conflicts and became a mascot of sorts -- and, in an…
 
Today, the humble potato can be found in restaurants and dinner tables across the world -- but this wasn't always the case. In today's episode, Ben and Noel dive into the story of one spud-loving, potato-proselytizing man named Antoine-Augustin Parmentier, and his ambitious life's mission to get an entire continent onboard with the idea of an obscu…
 
Beau and Carl chat about the ancient nomadic Steppe people, the Scythians. As enigmatic as they are fascinating, these mounted warriors wrote nothing down, so we rely heavily on the ancient Greek historian Herodotus for our primary literary evidence. This, combined with modern archaeology and scholarship, paints the picture of a truly incredible pe…
 
What exactly is Bhutanese "Night Hunting," and how does it work? How do some rural Cambodian communities navigate the tricky world of dating while living in communal homes? It's often said the course of true love never did run smooth -- and it sure takes some odd turns on the path from courtship to marriage. In the second part of this special two-p…
 
Would you whisper sweet nothings to your sweeheart through a six-foot tube with your Puritan grandmother in the room? Would you force feed your children to make them more attractive for a potential groom? It's often said the course of true love never did run smooth -- and it sure takes some odd turns on the path from courtship to marriage. In part …
 
Beau and Carl chat about the year of the four emperors. It's a rip-roaring roller coaster of a tale. After the death of the notorious Nero, several ambitious generals try to assume the imperial diadem for themselves. Listen along and find out who ends up winning!https://www.lotuseaters.com/premium-epochs-of-the-lotus-eaters-11-or-the-year-of-the-fo…
 
How historically accurate is the 2017 comedy “The Death of Stalin”? As funny as the film is, it plays fast and loose with it’s history. The post How Historically Accurate is The Death of Stalin (2017)? | A.D. HISTORY WATCHES appeared first on TGNR.By Paul K. DiCostanzo, Patrick Foote
 
This week, Syd talks about a major sacrifice made during the construction of the Curtea de Arges in Romania. And Kate, recounts several people who have found themselves in the sticky situation of being eaten by a whale. All this and more in another episode of Shut Up! Keep Going. Check us out on YouTube (/shutupkeepgoing) and our image guide for ea…
 
Underwear! Whether we're talking boxers, briefs, loincloths, brassieres or even lingerie, undergarments have a storied history in cultures across the planet. It's a tale touching on everything from shifting attitudes about morality to scientific innovations, fashion and more. In today's episode, Ben and Noel take a closer look at the ancient origin…
 
Archaeology & Ale is a monthly series of talks presented by Archaeology in the City, part of the University of Sheffield Archaeology Department’s outreach programme. It's our honour to welcome Professor John Barrett speaking on the 'The Importance and Future of Archaeology: a personal view.' This talk took place on June 16th in-person and online vi…
 
The pudding is a dish very difficult to be described, because of the several sorts there are of it: flour, milk, eggs, butter, sugar, suet, marrow, raising, etc are the most common ingredients...They make them fifty several ways: BLESSED BE HE THAT INVENTED PUDDING for it is a manna that hits the palates of all sorts of people... Ah what an excelle…
 
Since before the dawn of recorded history, human beings have been obsessed with talking to each other. This primal impulse inspired French occultist Jacques-Toussaint Benoît to propose a new, global communication system in the mid-1800s, a system he was certain would replace the telegraph: collections of snails. Benoît was certain snails, after mat…
 
Continuing our exploration of gender and sexuality in Islamic history we turn to the figure of the mukhannathun, a third gender category in early Islam. We trace ideas of gender as a fluid spectrum through the lives of these individuals examining their existence in the life of Muhammad and the nascent Muslim community, the Umayyads, and their event…
 
Beau and Carl chat about the life and times of Charles Martel - Charles The Hammer - the Frankish warlord of the eight century who successfully repulsed the Islamic hordes of the Umayyad Caliphate who had pushed across the Pyrenees and into central France.https://www.lotuseaters.com/preview-epochs-of-the-lotus-eaters-10-or-charles-martel-11-07-21…
 
Hugo and Carl review the United Nations’ emerging “Our Common Agenda” coming out of the UN’s 75th anniversary, including the declaration setting out its main outlines, and discuss the future of the UN more broadly.https://www.lotuseaters.com/premium-contemplations-28-or-our-common-agenda-for-a-post-covid-world-10-07-21…
 
In this week’s episode, Syd is inspired by the release of F9 and brings us through Japan’s secret racing group, the Mid Night Club. Kate, also inspired by transportation, talks to us about the Crash at Crush, a locomotive that is both loco and …motive. All this and more in another episode of Shut Up! Keep Going. Check us out on YouTube (/shutupkeep…
 
We've all had those days where we just need a little solitude, a quiet place away from the clamor and chatter of other people. However, William John Cavensidh-Scott-Bentinck, the 5th Duke of Portland, took this to an extreme. He spent the majority of his life minimizing the chance that he might have to run into other people, and eventually honeycom…
 
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