show episodes
 
Popular Front is a grassroots media organisation that focuses solely on war and conflict. We go deeper than mainstream news in a way that makes important war coverage accessible for everyone. The podcast focuses on the niche details of modern warfare and under-reported conflict. See more at www.popularfront.co
 
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This Is Palestine

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This Is Palestine

The Institute of Middle East Understanding

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'This Is Palestine' is a podcast that highlights people, issues, and events around Palestine. We bring you stories from the ground in Palestine, and we speak with experts and activists to bring you unique perspectives and analysis about Palestine from across the world. This podcast is a project of the Institute for Middle East Understanding (IMEU).
 
Listen to lively stories and inspiring interviews about the history and cultural heritage of Palestine and the ongoing Palestinian struggle for justice and equality. Every Monday a new episode. Subscribe to the mailing list for a weekly update so you never miss an episode. All social media links (facebook, instagram and youtube) and to subscribe to the mail chimp are in one place, easy, on the website www.storiesfrompalestine.info The music for this podcast was made by Zaid Hilal, Palestinia ...
 
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Rethinking Palestine

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Rethinking Palestine

Al-Shabaka: The Palestinian Policy Network

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Rethinking Palestine is a podcast from Al-Shabaka: The Palestinian Policy Network, a transnational think tank that aims to foster public debate on Palestinian human rights and self-determination. We draw upon the vast knowledge and experience of the Palestinian people, whether in Palestine or in exile, to put forward strong and diverse Palestinian policy voices. In this podcast, we will be bringing these voices to you so that you can listen to Palestinians sharing their analysis wherever you ...
 
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CJPME Debrief

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CJPME Debrief

Canadians for Justice and Peace in the Middle East

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Tom Woodley and Michael Bueckert from CJPME discuss breaking events and issues related to human rights in Palestine and the broader Middle East. Beyond the breaking stories, they’ll also invite guests with special expertise, and do episodes to provide context to the news, whether historical, legal or political. This podcast is a project of Canadians for Justice and Peace in the Middle East – CJPME (www.cjpme.org) – and seeks to advance its mission to empower Canadians of all backgrounds to p ...
 
On the Ground for Palestine is a weekly podcast to keep you updated on the news events and activism happening on the ground in Palestine and Israel. Each episode is short, less than 10 minutes, covering major stories from the past week, and is available as an audio-only podcast and as a video podcast. We are very open to suggestions for how to improve the podcast. Our goal is to create something that is useful for activists for Palestine around the world.
 
PAX Palestine Podcast is a podcast that features interviews with some of the local Palestinian partners of PAX, a peace organization based in the Netherlands. PAX works together with committed citizens and partners to protect civilians against acts of war, to end armed violence, and to build a just peace. In Palestine PAX supports local partners in building resilient communities, promoting human security and equality in the political, cultural and social domain, and in fighting the injustice ...
 
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PeaceCast

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PeaceCast

Americans for Peace Now

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PeaceCast is a podcast produced in Washington by Americans for Peace Now, the sister-organization of Israel’s preeminent peace movement, exploring issues and trends relating to peace and security for Israel, focusing on Israel’s conflict with the Palestinians and efforts to resolve it. If you care about Israel, about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, about Israel’s future as a democracy and a Jewish state, this podcast is for you. Episodes feature experts, activists, advocates and scholars w ...
 
The New Israel Fund Australia podcast brings you interviews, stories and events with some of Israel and Diaspora Jewry's most influential and impactful voices. NIF is a partnership of Israelis and supporters of Israel worldwide, dedicated to a vision of Israel as both the Jewish homeland and a democracy for all its citizens. We promote freedom, equality and social justice in Israel by funding Israeli non-profits and fostering new discussions in the Australian Jewish community.
 
Each week The Intercept’s Washington, D.C. bureau brings you one important or overlooked story from the political world. Bureau Chief Ryan Grim and a rotating cast of journalists, politicians, academics and historians tell you what the rest of the media are missing. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
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Just World Podcasts

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Just World Podcasts

Helena Cobban and Yousef Aljamal

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Just World Podcasts is an innovative podcast series on international affairs, run by the publishing house Just World Books which also provides this platform as a service to Just World Educational, a nonprofit headquartered in Virginia and Washington DC. The President of Just World Ed, veteran global-affairs writer and antiwar activist Helena Cobban, is the most frequent host on this podcast.
 
The Peace Tribe Rising community is all about unfolding a new identity as peacemakers and people who are committed to living together in peace. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict can be viewed as a battle between two tribes with competing religious, national, and historical narratives and identities. Peace Tribe Rising is empowering a new, shared identity: the Peace Tribe. Together, we are unfolding a future of reconciliation, peace and human rights for all the people of the holy land. We come ...
 
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All Things Palestinian Canadian

1
All Things Palestinian Canadian

Canadians for Justice and Peace in the Middle East

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Nur Watad from CJPME dives into the realm of what it means to be Palestinian living in Canada. She explores all aspects of Palestinian culture and art as well as history and politics to encourage Palestinian pride and engagement. Nur will frequently be joined by Palestinian guests to shed insight and perspective on new and thought-provoking topics. This podcast is a project of Canadians for Justice and Peace in the Middle East - CJPME (www.cjpme.org) - and seeks to advance its mission to emp ...
 
Coping with coronavirus’ fruits of boredom? Well, make our Asia House Arts In Isolation series your favourite playlist and belt them out — and open a window so others can hear.Pretty much everything from the Louvre to the NBA has been closed, cancelled or postponed. But it takes more than that to really cancel culture. Because if you can’t visit art, we bring it to you. We can still remain connected to the creative voices who help us make sense of our times.
 
2020 isn't going to be fun for anybody, left, right, or center. What many call the Most Important Election of Our Lifetime is going to be exhausting, ugly, angry, and probably at least a little racist. Listen as Robert Evans, Katy Stoll, and Cody Johnston try to keep level heads covering the election while traveling the country, from the Iowa Caucus to gun shows and anti-vaccine conventions, finding out what Real America really wants and thinks during the, “Worst Year Ever.”
 
Every week Chris Hayes asks the big questions that keep him up at night. How do we make sense of this unprecedented moment in world history? Why is this (all) happening? This podcast starts to answer these questions. Writers, experts, and thinkers who are also trying to get to the bottom of them join Chris to break it all down and help him get a better night’s rest. “Why is this Happening?” is presented by MSNBC and NBCNews Think.
 
Each week Andrew Parasiliti, president of the award-winning news site Al-Monitor, and Amberin Zaman, Al-Monitor’s Senior Correspondent, interview newsmakers, journalists and thought leaders from the US and Middle East about the latest news and trends in the region. Andrew has been writing about, and traveling in, the Middle East for over three decades, meeting and interviewing the region’s top political and civil society leaders. Since obtaining his PH.D from Johns Hopkins University, he has ...
 
We often overlook Islamic history as a learning tool. The history of Islam is not only important for Muslims, but important for everyone. Islam and the people who call themselves Muslims have made an enormous impact on our world. The Islamic History Podcast is about discovering that history in a fun and interesting way.
 
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show series
 
“Nước Việt Nam: a home, a cradle, a point of departure” (Gandhi, 1). The Vietnamese word nước embraces the duality of land and water with an idea of “home.” Through a nuanced examination of the meaning of homeland and politics of belonging, Evyn Lê Espiritu Gandhi proposes nước to understand complex positionalities of refugee settlers on lands sutu…
 
With a group of fifteen Palestinians and foreigners we visited the Arak distillery of Nader Muaddi in Beit Jalla. This podcast episode was recorded during his presentation. Nader Muaddi is very passionate about the craft of distilling Arak and the Palestinian heritage of this product. Arak is the oldest spirit in the world. Every single spirit come…
 
Welcome to the fifth episode of a weekly podcast that will keep you updated on the news events and activism happening on the ground in Palestine and Israel. Each episode Is short, around 5 minutes long, informing you about the most important stories from the past week, and Is available as either an audio-only podcast or as a video podcast. We are v…
 
This week Lara and Michael sit down with famed Palestinian human rights lawyer, scholar, and professor of law, Dr Noura Erakat. We discuss how international law was formed by colonial powers in order to facilitate imperial expansion. How international law has favored the settler-colonial project far more than Palestinians. We chat about a time when…
 
In 1999 Al-Quds University created the “Community Action Center” (“CAC”), a semi autonomous association, which aims to empower the Palestinian community in East Jerusalem. The CAC aims to empower the disadvantaged Palestinians of East Jerusalem to access their rights and entitlements and negotiate the complex bureaucratic procedures that control th…
 
On episode 57, we speak with members of the NDN Collective about their recently released position paper on Palestinian liberation – “The Right of Return is LANDBACK.”Krystal Two Bulls, Demetrius Johnson and Nadya Tannous of the NDN Collective tell us that the resistance by Indigenous peoples to the US’ centuries-long programs of ethnic cleansing an…
 
Shireen Abu Akleh was a household name in the middle east and her death is being mourned around the world. What does the death of the 51 year old Palestinian-American journalist, killed while reporting in the West Bank, near Jerusalem, mean for press freedom in the region and globally.
 
Shireen Abu Akleh was a trailblazing Palestinian journalist who spent decades covering Israel’s brutal military occupation of Palestine.On Wednesday, Israeli soldiers fatally shot her in the face while she was reporting on the Israeli military’s invasion of a home in the Palestinian city of Jenin. Shireen was wearing a clearly marked press vest and…
 
The Lost Promise: American Universities in the 1960s (University of Chicago Press, 2021) is a magisterial examination of the turmoil that rocked American universities in the 1960s, with a unique focus on the complex roles played by professors as well as students. The 1950s through the early 1970s are widely seen as American academia’s golden age, w…
 
Lives of Weeds: Opportunism, Resistance, Folly (Comstock Publishing, 2021) explores the tangled history of weeds and their relationship to humans. Through eight interwoven stories, John Cardina offers a fresh perspective on how these tenacious plants came about, why they are both inevitable and essential, and how their ecological success is ensured…
 
“Nước Việt Nam: a home, a cradle, a point of departure” (Gandhi, 1). The Vietnamese word nước embraces the duality of land and water with an idea of “home.” Through a nuanced examination of the meaning of homeland and politics of belonging, Evyn Lê Espiritu Gandhi proposes nước to understand complex positionalities of refugee settlers on lands sutu…
 
Most stories of medical progress come with ready-made heroes. John Snow traced the origins of London's 1854 cholera outbreak to a water pump, leading to the birth of epidemiology. Florence Nightingale's contributions to the care of soldiers in the Crimean War revolutionized medical hygiene, transforming hospitals from crucibles of infection to sanc…
 
Does Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida´s new administration represent the true beginning of the “Post-Abe” era for Japan? After the one-year transitional administration of Yoshihide Suga, Kishida was able to win a three-year term as head of the LDP, the premiership, and lower house election in fall 2021. Since then Kishida has proven to be reas…
 
In Fierce Appetites: Loving, Losing and Living to Excess in my Present and in the Writings of the Past (Sandy Cove, 2022), Dr. Elizabeth Boyle weaves together the past and the present together, creating a beautiful memoir and reflection. To quote the book blurb, “Not only does Elizabeth Boyle write dazzling accounts of ancient stories, familiar and…
 
Today Stephen and I talk with EWP Phd grad and adjunct faculty, Heidi Fraser. She is also the Director of the CIIS Center for Writing and Scholarship, and was a former EWP program manager. We explore aspects of Integral Yoga as taught by Hari Das Chaudhuri and Bahman Shairazi and it’s applications in scholarship and activism. We also discuss approa…
 
Art historian Catherine McCormack challenges how culture teaches us to see and value women, their bodies, and their lives. Venus, maiden, wife, mother, monster—women have been bound so long by these restrictive roles, codified by patriarchal culture, that we scarcely see them. In Women in the Picture: What Culture Does with Female Bodies (Norton, 2…
 
Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji (Vanderbilt UP, 2022) is the story of what happened in Okoboji, a small Iowan tourist town, when a collective turn from the coronavirus to the economy occurred in the COVID summer of 2020. State political failures, local negotiations among political and public health leaders, and community (dis)be…
 
Against a groundswell of critiques of global English, Vernacular English: Reading the Anglophone in Postcolonial India (Princeton UP, 2022) argues that literary studies are yet to confront the true political import of the English language in the world today. A comparative study of three centuries of English literature and media in India, this origi…
 
The Lost Promise: American Universities in the 1960s (University of Chicago Press, 2021) is a magisterial examination of the turmoil that rocked American universities in the 1960s, with a unique focus on the complex roles played by professors as well as students. The 1950s through the early 1970s are widely seen as American academia’s golden age, w…
 
Unmasked: COVID, Community, and the Case of Okoboji (Vanderbilt UP, 2022) is the story of what happened in Okoboji, a small Iowan tourist town, when a collective turn from the coronavirus to the economy occurred in the COVID summer of 2020. State political failures, local negotiations among political and public health leaders, and community (dis)be…
 
Art historian Catherine McCormack challenges how culture teaches us to see and value women, their bodies, and their lives. Venus, maiden, wife, mother, monster—women have been bound so long by these restrictive roles, codified by patriarchal culture, that we scarcely see them. In Women in the Picture: What Culture Does with Female Bodies (Norton, 2…
 
Recent years have seen out-of-control wildfires rage across remote Brazilian rainforests, densely populated California coastlines, and major cities in Australia. What connects these separate events is more than immediate devastation and human loss of life. In Global Burning: Rising Antidemocracy and the Climate Crisis (Stanford UP, 2022), Eve Daria…
 
A powerful movement is happening in farming today—farmers are reconnecting with their roots to fight climate change. For one woman, that’s meant learning her tribe’s history to help bring back the buffalo. For another, it’s meant preserving forest purchased by her great-great-uncle, among the first wave of African Americans to buy land. Others are …
 
Grain traders wandering across the steppe; the Russian conquest of Ukraine (in the 18th century, that is); boulevard barons and wheat futures; railroads; the first fast food breakfast; and war socialism. It’s all crammed into this discussion of wheat, and what it wrought, with Scott Nelson. Scott Reynolds Nelson is the Georgia Athletics Association…
 
Rivers host vibrant multispecies communities in their waters and along their banks, and, according to queer-trans-feminist river scientist Cleo Wölfle Hazard, their future vitality requires centering the values of justice, sovereignty, and dynamism. At the intersection of river sciences, queer and trans theory, and environmental justice, Underflows…
 
In China and the International Human Rights Regime (Cambridge University Press, 2021), Rana Siu Inboden examines the evolution of China’s posture towards the U.N. human rights system since the early 1980s. The book examines in unprecedented details China’s role and impact on the complex negotiations between U.N. members over the International Coven…
 
In Neuromatic: Or, a Particular History of Religion and the Brain (U Chicago Press, 2021), religious studies scholar John Lardas Modern offers a sprawling examination of the history of the cognitive revolution and current attempts to locate all that is human in the brain, including spirituality itself. Neuromatic is a wildly original take on the en…
 
Brotherhood to Nationhood: George Manuel and the Making of the Modern Indian Movement (Between the Lines Books, 2020) details the life of George Manuel, a seminal figure in the emergence and development of the modern Indigenous rights movement in Canada. A three-time Nobel Peace Prize nominee, he laid the groundwork for what would become the Assemb…
 
On this edition of Parallax Views, former President Donald Trump has had an image, sometimes leaned into by the man himself, as being akin to a mob boss. The image of Trump-as-mob-boss is even evoked, arguably, in the way that Trump is sometimes referred to as "The Donald". But beyond the image of pop culture image of Trump-as-mobster lies a portal…
 
Malak El Batroukh, a Palestinian-Canadian based in Waterloo has just launched an exciting new community project called Sporas (Scattered.) Through this project, Malak aims to make Palestinian culture and tradition more accessible to diaspora youth. In this episode, we talk to Malak about her vision for Sporas, and her broader work as a activist for…
 
His beautiful voice and remarkable cover versions brought him a devoted following online, but it's his own songs that have turned Teddy Swims into a burgeoning superstar, with a sound that's a throwback to the classic moments of soul.In the Drawing Room, Teddy Swims talks about his path to music and the promises he's made and kept, to himself and t…
 
Happy election eve! We've made it to the end of a gruelling six-week campaign, relatively unscathed...but maybe a little worse for wear! To help unravel the week that was here's Associate Editor and columnist for the Australian Jenna Clarke and Political reporter at Guardian Australia and bulldozer junior, Paul Karp.…
 
Elizabeth Oyler and Katherine Saltzman-Li's book Cultural Imprints: War and Memory in the Samurai Age (Cornell UP, 2022) draws on literary works, artifacts, performing arts, and documents that were created by or about the samurai to examine individual "imprints," traces holding specifically grounded historical meanings that persist through time. Th…
 
Today I talk with Peter Salmon, author of An Event, Perhaps; an intellectual biography of Jacques Derrida. Our conversation was rich: We tackle Derrida and Buddhism, Derrida and the culture wars, Derrida and practice. Foucault gets a mention, as does Heidegger, as does spiritual enlightenment, mindfulness and spirituality. Our conversation was inco…
 
Defections from the People’s Republic of China (PRC) were an important part of the narrative of the Republic of China (ROC) in Taiwan during the Cold War, but their stories have previously barely been told, less still examined, in English. During the 1960s, 70s and 80s, the ROC government paid much special attention to these anti-communist heroes (…
 
In the decades after World War II, the American economy entered a period of prolonged growth that created unprecedented affluence—but these developments came at the cost of a host of new environmental problems. Unsurprisingly, a disproportionate number of them, such as pollution-emitting factories, waste-handling facilities, and big infrastructure …
 
Kim talks to Patrick Deer about the Military Industrial Complex, a term used by US President Dwight D. Eisenhower in a 1961 speech to describe a permanent war economy, and the political, economic, and cultural matrix that sustains it. References are made to James Ledbetter’s book Unwarranted Influence and Seymour Melman’s book The Permanent War Eco…
 
Olga Bertelsen’s timely book, In the Labyrinth of the KGB: Ukraine’s Intelligentsia in the 1960s-1970s (Lexington Books, 2022), focuses on the generation of the sixties and seventies in Kharkiv, Soviet Ukraine—a milieu of writers who lived through the Thaw and the processes of de-Stalinization and re-Stalinization. Special attention is paid to KGB …
 
In Race, Culture and Media (Sage, 2021), Anamik Saha provides an account of the role that media plays in both circulating and shaping ideas about race and racism in the contemporary world. Saha argues that we need to move beyond a focus on representation to engage with how media makes race. As Anamik describes in our interview, alongside providing …
 
Alysson Foti Bourque began her career as a teacher and subsequently an attorney. After practicing law for six years, she traded in writing trial briefs for writing children’s books. Her new picture book, Alycat and the Cattywampus Wednesday is the fifth book of The Alycat Series, and was released by Arcadia Publishing/Pelican Publishing (2022). Mel…
 
Sixteenth Street NW in Washington, DC, has been called the Avenue of the Presidents, Executive Avenue, and the Avenue of Churches. From the front door of the White House, this north-south artery runs through the middle of the District and extends just past its border with Maryland. The street is as central to the cityscape as it is to DC's history …
 
"I've been a philosopher for all my adult life and the three most profound books of philosophy that I have ever read are Ecclesiastes, Job, and Song of Songs." This is the opening line of Peter Kreeft's Three Philosophies of Life: Ecclesiastes, Job, and Song of Songs (Ignatius Press, 2016). He reflects that there are ultimately only three philosoph…
 
In 1977, Jeanne’s German nationalist ex-husband, Klaus, tells her he’s gotten a new job and wants to take their three-year-old daughter and six-year-old son away for a long weekend to celebrate. Jeanne relents. But Klaus never returns and instead sends Jeanne a letter, delivered by a mutual friend, in which he declares that he has fled to Germany a…
 
In the early twentieth century, Khunu Lama journeyed across Tibet and India, meeting Buddhist masters while sometimes living, so his students say, on cold porridge and water. Yet this elusive wandering renunciant became a revered teacher of the Fourteenth Dalai Lama. At Khunu Lama’s death in 1977, he was mourned by Himalayan nuns, Tibetan lamas, an…
 
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