show episodes
 
Loading …
show series
 
Sometimes we run into issues where SwiftUI doesn't quite do what we need. In some cases, SwiftUI views are powered by UIKit under the hood. Wouldn't it be great (and devious) to dig into the underlying UIKit views to customize things when vanilla SwiftUI just won't cut it? In this episode we'll look at a technique for discovering the UIKit undernea…
 
Context menus are a great affordance for performing related actions to a UI element. Users can tap and hold to view the context menu, and the gesture is consistent across the OS so users will likely already be familiar with it. In this episode we'll show how to set up a basic context menu with a custom preview with normal and destructive actions.…
 
This is a discussion and code overview of another implementation of mapping models using key paths with a special guest, Antoine van der Lee! In this episode we talk about his initial goals and constraints, and some of the design tradeoffs he made while designing a solution that would give him a bidirectional mapping between Core Data entities and …
 
In this episode we migrate our collection view to use the new cell registration API. Using this API we no longer need to cast dequeued cell types to our custom types. Instead, we set up the registration object with the cell type and the data we'll be passing to each cell. This further reduces the code we have to write in our datasource implementati…
 
With UITableView no longer being encouraged for use, we need to replace this behavior with UICollectionView. This is where UICollectionViewListLayout comes into play. Using this layout we can get the familiar table view appearance in plain and grouped styles (as well as additional styles to support sidebars on iPad and macOS). This includes support…
 
I've been working on rendering waveforms using mathematical functions and have found the experience to be both fun and enlightening. In this episode we will develop a method to render arbitrary functions using a Shape, then explore some mathematical concepts that can help us render a nice looking waveform that could be use to indicate activity in s…
 
With the introduction of LazyVGrid and LazyHGrid In iOS 14 we now have access to much more powerful grid-based layouts in SwiftUI. In this episode We will examine the different types of layouts we can accomplish with flexible, fixed, and adaptive sizing for our rows and columns. We'll look at how animations work between different layouts, and how t…
 
iOS 14 Beta is now available and one of the new features is Lazy stacks. With a normal stack, all the layout happened at once, which meant poor performance for large lists of content, grids, etc. With Lazy stacks the views are only created when they first come on screen, greatly increasing the usefulness of stacks for large or infinite collections …
 
Before Swift 5 we used to write our own Result type to contain a value or an error (but never both). A lot of 3rd party libraries brought along their own as well. Then Swift 5 came and brought us Result. Not only is it slightly different than the ones we might be familiar with, Swift's Result type also has some useful functionality up its sleeve.…
 
Sometimes we need to create variants of our icons. This can be done by using template images and using a UIImageView with a tintColor change, however sometimes this isn't feasible. We can use our icons along with a mask to create new images of whatever color we want. In this episode we'll use UIGraphicsImageRenderer to quickly draw a new dimmed ima…
 
Working with dates is a task that is universally applicable to Swift developers. Particularly when dealing with an API, dates can arrive in all shapes and sizes. We‘ll examine some of the common ones such as ISO 8601, show how to parse these formats into Date instances, and how to use DateFormatter to display them back again as a string. We‘ll also…
 
UITableView can support scrolling through many rows of data, however fetching large amounts of remote data can slow down your app, use up too much memory, and bog down your web server. This is all wasteful if users aren‘t ever going to scroll down that far. In this episode you‘ll learn how to perform automatic UITableView pagination using an easy t…
 
In order to use CloudKit to read or write private data (or to write in the public database) the user will have to be signed in to iCloud on their device. If they are not, they'll not have a great experience, and things won't work. In this episode we'll check the account status before trying to save a record in CloudKit. We'll also respond to the no…
 
In this episode we cover a basic but fundamentally important topic: dealing with dates & times. Particularly when dealing with an API, dates can arrive in all shapes and sizes. We'll examine some of the common ones, talk about how to parse these formats into NSDate instances, and how to use NSDateFormatter to display them back again as a string.…
 
This week we take a look at Windows Azure Mobile Services, a back-end for mobile applications that has first class iOS support. In this episode we begin building a full featured chat application. This is part 1 of 2, in which we set up a new mobile service, wire up the SDK with CocoaPods, set up Twitter authentication and enrich the data using Java…
 
In this episode, we'll set up a free continuous integration server called Jenkins (previously Hudson) to run our build. We'll configure it to automatically check out changes from git, run the build, and finally run all of our tests. We'll then use a conversion script to translate the test output into JUnit test report files that Jenkins natively un…
 
UITableView can support skimming through many rows of data, however fetching large amounts of remote data can slow down your app, use up too much memory, and bog down your web server. This is all wasteful if users aren't ever going to scroll down that far. In this episode you'll learn how to perform automatic UITableView paging using an easy techni…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2023 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login