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Nature Podcast

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Nature Podcast

Springer Nature Limited

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The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of the Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
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What are stars made of? How do ants breathe? How does a person catch chickenpox? Why are sunsets and sunrises red? What are planets made of? How many bones in a human body? How do Earthquakes occur? IF the Earth's round, why don't we fall off? Why doesn't sand dissolve? How does a bird fly? This week Lester and Dr Chris are with the kids at the AKA…
 
Not one but four astronauts feature in this month's Space Boffins. Sue Nelson and Richard Hollingham chat to astronaut Nicole Stott about her book Back to Earth; we hear about the drama of launch, what to do when things go wrong and the challenges of interviewing other astronauts. Sue also attends a glamorous space event in London to catch up with …
 
The warmer weather is here and, with it, solar energy is on my mind. Sun-thing tells me I'm into something good. Join us in the first of our series of programmes on renewable energy sources as the world faces a difficult energy challenge and the threat of an 'apocalyptic' food shortage crisis. We'll be speaking to some of the players, big and small…
 
Lots of us feel the need to believe in something in order to make sense of the world whether it takes the form of religious faith, the provability of science, or some singular strongly-held theory. But belief does not necessarily satisfy another great human need, the need to belong to a community. Joining Ed Kessler, Danny Smith and Grace Davie exp…
 
There's news of a huge rift in the world of video games... EA Sports, who made the first ever FIFA football game in 1993, have announced that they will no longer be licensing the FIFA name. Chris Berrow, from the Naked Gaming Podcast, has been finding out why and what the consequences might be... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the …
 
Now, I want you to cast your mind back to that first lockdown (if you can bear it) and to think about the ways you chose to fill all that new found free time. Perhaps, like the participants of a survey conducted by the Paris Brain Institute to learn more about the effects of the pandemic on creativity, you decided to sharpen your culinary skills, o…
 
Linda wrote in to ask "Can the spinning of the earth generate electricity similar to the spinning of wind turbines?" Otis Kingsman spoke to Matthew Rooney from the Insitute of Mechanical Engineers to find the answer to this head-spinner... Like this podcast? Please help us by supporting the Naked Scientists…
 
Thanks for joining us here on the Naked Gaming Podcast. And we're back this month with another episode of Monkey Island Discs, where we talk to people about their favourite games and gaming memories. Today's guest is the video game writer Rihanna Pratchett, who has worked on huge games like Heavenly Sword and the reboot of Tomb Raider. She is also …
 
Not one but four astronauts feature in this month's Space Boffins. Sue Nelson and Richard Hollingham chat to astronaut Nicole Stott about her book Back to Earth; we hear about the drama of launch, what to do when things go wrong and the challenges of interviewing other astronauts. Sue also attends a glamorous space event in London to catch up with …
 
Dr Chris Smith and the Naked Scientist team look at the warning signs of bowel cancer, whether the so-called “runners high” exists, and following claims of war crimes committed by Vladimir Putin's forces in Ukraine how forensic archaeologists can help uncover evidence of what’s happened.This episodes looks in detail at how forensic investigators ex…
 
00:45 The puzzle of Palaeospondylus Over a hundred years ago, palaeontologists discovered fossils of the aquatic animal Palaeospondylus. But since then researchers have been unable to place where this animal sits on the tree of life. Now, new analysis of Palaeospondylus’s anatomy might help to solve this mystery. Research article: Hirasawa et al. N…
 
Shortages of cooking oil, risks of being hit by lightning and can lightning travel through your plumbing; why boats have round portholes; what's the memory capacity of a human brain; can we measure happiness; do animals feel happy and sad like we do; what gives farts their unique characteristics, and why do stars twinkle? Lester and Dr Chris have t…
 
00:47 The mystery of the missing dark matter Dark matter makes up most of the matter in the Universe, and is thought to be needed for galaxies to form. But four years ago, astronomers made a perplexing, and controversial discovery: two galaxies seemingly devoid of dark matter. This week the team suggests that a cosmic collision may explain how thes…
 
From a chance meeting in a bar in the far Arctic North, Will talks to Sergei Chernikov, a 30-year-old Russian living in Svalbard. From Moscow to Longyearbyen, Sergei speaks openly about why people shouldn't speak about nationality, but instead should look to his new word of "valuenality" to change perceptions and avoid stereotyping people based on …
 
War crimes. Violations of international law, such as the targeted killing of civilians, which could lead to the prosecution of those responsible. As the horrors of conflict continue in Ukraine, claims of war crime are increasing. Proving a crime has been committed in these circumstances is a long process and can be incredibly tough. But science can…
 
Millions of people around the world have been left managing the complex and amorphous syndrome that is long COVID. But the underlying cause of this myriad of symptoms is not clear. One hypothesis is that the virus is able to find a safe haven in the body from which it can bide its time and potentially re-emerge - a viral reservoir. Now researchers …
 
00:57 Reviving retinas to understand eyes Research efforts to learn more about diseases of the human eye have been hampered as these organs degrade rapidly after death, and animal eyes are quite different to those from humans. To address this, a team have developed a new method to revive retinas taken from donors shortly after their death. They hop…
 
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