show episodes
 
Battlecast is the world’s foremost podcast about war and it’s sociopolitical impact. Each month Dr. Luke Wolf works to bring you an unfiltered understanding of the most important battles and wars of mankind’s history. The official motto of the show: “not left, not right: above,” provides a fresh look at the conventional understandings found in history books. So pull up a chair, grab a beer, and join the conversation.
 
Achtung! Achtung! Comedian Al Murray and historian James Holland discuss all matters Second World War. We Have Ways of Making You Talk is a bi-weekly show exploring the war in close up. James and Al have a stunning knowledge of their subject, but don't expect a linear narrative. The boys love a tangent and a forgotten tale. We Have Ways of Making You Talk roams down forgotten front lines, casts new villains and makes the case for unlikely heroes. Send questions to James and Al via Twitter us ...
 
A history podcast looking at all aspects of WWII, military history, social history, the battles, the campaigns, tanks, gun and other equipment, the politics and those who ran the war. I look at it all. With WW2 slipping from living memory I aim to look at different historical aspects of the Second World War. In each episode of the WWII Podcast I interview an expert on a subject. No topics are out of bounds (as yet), and I cover the military history side of the war as well as looking the home ...
 
TOP SECRET Personal Attention, SpyCast Listeners Known to be the podcast real spies listen to -(STOP)- eavesdrop on conversations with high level sources from around the world -(STOP)- spychiefs molehunters defectors covert operators analysts cyberwarriors technologists debriefed by SPY Historian Hammond -(STOP)- stories secrets tradecraft and technology discussed -(STOP)- museum confirmed to have greatest collection of artifacts on the subject anywhere in the world -(STOP)- podcast rumored ...
 
The Irregular Warfare Podcast explores an important component of war throughout history. Small wars, drone strikes, special operations forces, counterterrorism, proxies—this podcast covers the full range of topics related to irregular war and features in-depth conversations with guests from the military, academia, and the policy community. The podcast is a collaboration between the Modern War Institute at West Point and Princeton's Empirical Studies of Conflict Project.
 
Servicemembers from across the military, sharing their accounts of combat and survival. Hosted by sports talk radio host and Army veteran, Mark Zinno, this podcast brings you firsthand accounts of war, with a perspective you only get from someone who has lived through it. From WWII to Vietnam, Somalia, and the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, hear inspirational stories of service and resiliency from those who have fought on and off the battlefield!
 
Bletchley Park is the home of British codebreaking and a birthplace of modern information technology. It played a major role in World War Two, producing secret intelligence which had a direct and profound influence on the outcome of the conflict. The site is now a museum and heritage attraction, open daily. The Bletchley Park Podcast brings you fascinating stories from Veterans, staff and volunteers on the significance and continued relevance of this site today.
 
Learn the lessons of military history by looking at the great battles through the lens of the Principles of War. Part of the enduring nature of war, all good Generals follow the 10 Principles of War. The great Generals of history have the ability to know which of the principles are most important at the decisive moments of the campaign. We study the great battles to draw the lessons on strategy, tactics and leadership.
 
History of the Great War is a weekly podcast that will cover the First World War that occurred from 1914 and 1918. Every week we will be discussing the events that occurred exactly 100 years ago. We will journey from the borders of France in the blistering heat of 1914, to the shores of Gallipoli, to the banks of Somme, to the final knockout attempt by the German army in the spring of 1918.
 
The Black Vault Radio with John Greenewald, Jr. dives deep into the world of secret U.S. Government and Military History spanning more than a half century. Using an archive of more than 2,100,000 declassified government documents as a starting point, Greenewald speaks to some of the most brilliant minds on the planet trying to get to the truth.
 
The Battles of the First World War Podcast goes in-depth into the battles of the Great War of 1914-1918. The goal is to really go into the details of how and why these battles unfolded and happened as they did. In telling the narrative of these clashes we can revisit some of the stories of the men and women who lived, fought, and died during the first titanic struggle of the 20th Century, for these people have stories that deserve to be told.
 
Walk the battlefields of the First World War with Military Historian, Paul Reed. In these podcasts, Paul brings together over 35 years of studying the Great War, from the stories of veterans he interviewed, to when he spent more than a decade living on the Old Front Line in the heart of the Somme battlefields.
 
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The Spear

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The Spear

Modern War Institute at West Point

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The Spear is a podcast from the Modern War Institute at West Point. It aims to explore the combat experience, with each episode featuring a guest who tells a detailed and personal story, describing the events and exploring topics like decision-making under stress and what it feels like to be in combat.
 
History is, indeed, a story. With his unique voice and engaging delivery, historian and veteran storyteller Fred Kiger will help the compelling stories of the American Civil War come alive in each and every episode. Filled with momentous issues and repercussions that still resonate with us today, this series will feature events and people from that period and will strive to make you feel as if you were there.
 
Explore the rich history of our past through the lens of our military institutions. From the settlement of North America to the present, this podcast encompasses traditional military history and goes the extra step to address the evolution of ideas and institutions. Join us!
 
The Indian subcontinent is about the size of Europe and is way more diverse and complicated - but how much do we know about its violent past? The land of Gandhi is also the land of the war-elephant, of gunpowder-wielding infantry, and of nuclear weapons that destroy everything in their wake. In Yuddha, Anirudh Kanisetti (host of Echoes of India: A History Podcast) and Aditya Ramanathan explore the darker, blood-splattered side of India, beyond Bollywood and school textbooks. From the medieva ...
 
From Napoleonic battles to Cold War confrontations, the Normandy landings to 9/11, this podcast opens up fascinating new perspectives on how wars have shaped and changed our modern world. Each week, twice a week, war historian, writer, and broadcaster, James Rogers, teams up with fellow historians, veterans, and experts to reveal astonishing new histories of inspirational leadership, breakthrough technologies, and era defining battles. Together they highlight the stark realities and conseque ...
 
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According to US Secretary of War Henry Stimson, the "most shocking single event" of World War II was not the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, but rather the fall of France in spring 1940. Michael Neiberg offers a dramatic history of the American response--a policy marked by panic and moral ineptitude, which placed the United States in league with f…
 
Pete and Gary continue their exploration of the life of Sir Douglas Haig, as he orchestrates one of the most controversial chapters of his career - the Battle of the Somme. Presenters: Peter Hart and Gary Bain Publisher: Mat McLachlan Producer: Jess Stebnicki For more great history content, visit www.LivingHistoryTV.com, or subscribe to our YouTube…
 
This is part of a 2 part military deception miniseries looking at why Rommel placed his Divisions where he did and how his mobility was limited by deception. We review doctrine on Surprise and Security. Deception is often a critical partner to Surprise, but without Security, your deception measures are unlikely to be effective. We look at the large…
 
YUDDHA is going on a mid-season break as Anirudh and Aditya are struggling with a sudden invasion of responsibilities from their day jobs (and Anirudh's very exciting first book!) More in this brief episode. YUDDHA is made possible thanks to the support of the Takshashila Institution and the Independent and Public Spirited Media Foundation. Notes a…
 
On February 6, 2020, the U.S. Army Heritage and Education Center in Carlisle, Pennsylvania welcomed USAHEC Senior Historian Dr. Michael Lynch as he presented his talk on Edward M. Almond. Lt. Gen. Edward M. Almond was one of the more controversial leaders in U.S. Army history, but his story is more nuanced than the legends indicate. He commanded th…
 
In this episode I look at the American Army in South Vietnam in 1965 as it builds up its resources in the country and begins to fight the Viet Cong and the North Vietnamese Army. I shall deal with how the American Army is organised from the command of MACV down to the battalion and company. I deal with some of the weapon of the American Army and lo…
 
In this episode we are Behind the Lines on the Somme, starting in the small village of Heilly, and looking at how soldiers were billeted in places like this, we then walk down to the railway station and examine the use of railways on the Somme and establishment of medical facilities for the wounded. We end at Heilly Station Cemetery, a vast city of…
 
hroughout history, IW organizations have undergone dramatic changes at all levels to meet the demands of new operating environments and threats. The book The Changing of the Guard: The British Army since 9/11 explores the difficulties the British Army faced trying to reorganize for irregular warfare in Iraq and Afghanistan. Simon Akam, the book's a…
 
Once the Little Orphan Annie comic strip was adapted to a radio program, it wasn't just a hit show -- it was a marketing coup for the good folks at Ovaltine. The company underwrote the program, riddled it with advertising, and worked like mad to convince every child in the US that they must drink as much Ovaltine as possible. Tune in and learn more…
 
- This Christmas in the South Pacific would be far more festive than last time. - Three US soldiers came upon a small cabin in the woods. - We followed the side of the bomb and found a second fuse A few more yards. I clambered onto the train – Yess! - Our Christmas Mission Was to fly Chinese troops up North! - ’Twas the night before Christmas and a…
 
The Battle of the Atlantic was the most important theatre of the war, so why don’t we ever talk about it? Military and Naval historian, Marc Milner, joins Al and James to navigate their way through the often snubbed battle. A Goalhanger Films production Produced by Vasco Andrade Exec Producer Tony Pastor Twitter: #WeHaveWays @WeHaveWaysPod Website:…
 
David Devaney enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps in 1983. After surviving boot camp, he soon pursued the opportunity to become a U.S. Marine sniper and was part of the early invasion of Iraq in March 2003. In this edition of "Veterans Chronicles," SgtMaj Devaney shares his memories at Parris Island both in training and as a drill sergeant. He also t…
 
When people think of the “Vietnam War” they usually think of the hugely devastating and divisive conflict between North Vietnam and a United States-backed South Vietnam that finally ended in 1975. We know much less about the earlier conflict, often referred to as the “First Indochina War”, from 1946 to 1954, which ended almost a century of French c…
 
More than one million Indian soldiers were deployed during World War I, serving in the Indian army as part of Britain's imperial war effort. These men fought in France and Belgium, Egypt and East Africa, and at Gallipoli, in Palestine, and in Mesopotamia. While Indian contributions to the war have long been recognized (unlike other colonial contrib…
 
Philp Fabian Flynn led a remarkable life, bearing witness to some of the most pivotal events of the twentieth century. Flynn took part in the invasions of Sicily and Normandy, the Battle of Aachen, and the Battle of the Hürtgen Forest. He acted as confessor to Nazi War Criminals during the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg, assisted Hung…
 
Author James Carl Nelson joins me in discussing his latest book, “The York Patrol: The Real Story of Alvin York and the Unsung Heroes Who Made Him World War I’s Most Famous Soldier.” The passing of a century and other events has worked to create and solidify the legend of SGT Alvin York, where the story goes that York single-handedly (or nearly so)…
 
Between September 1940 and May 1941, the German Luftwaffe relentlessly pounded British cities with bombs in an attempt to force the British to surrender. Ultimately whilst killing thousands and causing extensive damage the bombing offensive failed. The morale of the British public was largely undimmed and war production was never seriously impacted…
 
Although many success stories have come about from filing such cases on UFO related material (and beyond), there is now a trend with the CIA when processing MDR requests from The Black Vault: they keep losing their UFO files and can’t review them to properly fulfill the request.By John Greenewald, Jr.
 
These days, most folks think of Little Orphan Annie as a folksy, wholesome slice of nostalgia -- but during its heyday as a radio program, parents across the US became increasingly concerned. The show, they thought, had a deep, dangerous hold on the minds of children. In the first part of this two-part series, Ben and Noel dive into the surprising …
 
Gregg F. Martin, PhD, Major General, US Army (Retired), served on active duty for 36 years, until May 2015. He is a combat veteran, Bipolar Survivor, Airborne-Ranger-Engineer qualified soldier, and Army Strategist. He commanded an engineer company, battalion, the 130th Engineer Brigade in combat during the first year of the Iraq War in 2003-04, inc…
 
The Committee on Public Information (CPI) is the first and only Ministry of Propaganda the United States has ever had. It started one week after the United States entered World War I in April of 1917; in fact, there wasn't even conscription for some weeks, but the Committee on Public Information was created right away. Why? To explore this question…
 
Nations have powerful incentives to ensure that their military alliances are well-structured. Successful military alliances set long-lasting foundations for global and regional order, while unsuccessful ones can perpetuate and widen conflict. In Following the Leader: International Order, Alliance Strategies, and Emulation (Stanford UP, 2021), Kuo a…
 
The story of the deadliest woman in military historySupport the show: https://www.patreon.com/lionsledbydonkeysSources: Lady Death: The Memoir of Stalin's Sniper - Lyudmila Pavlichenkohttps://www.nationalww2museum.org/war/articles/lady-death-red-army-lyudmila-pavlichenkohttps://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/eleanor-roosevelt-and-the-soviet-sniper-…
 
2 December is a special date for those fascinated by Napoleon Bonaparte. Not only is this the date he crowned himself Emperor of France in 1804, but also the date of his greatest victory a year later, the Battle of Austerlitz. James Rogers is joined by world-leading historian Andrew Roberts to dissect the conditions, tactics and aftermath of Napole…
 
Today on the show, I talk to Tony Lupo and Ryan Fairfield about their show, The Warrior Next Door Podcast. Listen to the oral histories of World War II veterans from interviews conducted by Tony and Ryan as they provide historical context. Their efforts will help the experiences of these brave warriors live forever. Twitter - @WW2Podcaster. www.the…
 
The Continentals attempt to establish a fort in the Ohio region over the winter of 1778-79. Local tribes are unhappy with the deal and after a brief siege, force the Americans to withdraw back to Fort Pitt. Blog https://blog.AmRevPodcast.com includes a complete transcript, as well as pictures, and links related to this week's episode. Follow the po…
 
In today’s Family Stories we hear about a young Englishwoman who found herself in Germany in 1936 and went to hear Hitler speak. Plus stories from South Africa, Australia and the Scottish Isles. Read by Al Murray and James Holland, these extraordinary stories of normal people’s wartime adventures were sent in by you, our listeners. Email your stori…
 
Abram Van Engen of Washington University in St. Louis taught a class about how the Pilgrims became part of the United States' founding story in 19th-century history textbooks. He described why early historians and educators emphasized the Pilgrims' Plymouth Colony over earlier settlements, such as Jamestown in Virginia. Learn more about your ad cho…
 
In this episode, we return to Flanders, and walk from the Lille Gate on the edge of the city of Ypres via 'Shrapnel Corner' to Bedford House Cemetery, one of the largest in this area and laid out in an unusual way. We end on the old Ypres-Comines Canal where the German Army was stopped south of Ypres in April 1918. Support the show (https://www.pat…
 
What motivated conscripted soldiers to fight in the Romanian Army during the Second World War? Why did they obey orders, take risks, and sometimes deliberately sacrifice their lives for the mission? What made soldiers murder, rape, and pillage, massacring Jews en masse during Operation Barbarossa? Grant Harward’s ground-breaking book Romania's Holy…
 
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