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Hysterical History

101
Hysterical History

Alexis Lord and Hailey Strickon

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Hysterical History is a comedy podcast where Alexis and Hailey, friends and history lovers, tell each other wacky yet factual stories from the past. Join them every TUESDAY for laughs and weird history realness. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Renaissance England was a bustling and exciting place...new religion! break with rome! wars with Scotland! And France! And Spain! The birth of the modern world! In this twice-monthly podcast I'll explore one aspect of life in 16th century England that will give you a deeper understanding of this most exciting time. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Barbarians, political breakdown, economic collapse, mass migration, pillaging and plunder. The fall of the Roman Empire has been studied for years, but genetics, climate science, forensic science, network models, and globalization studies have reshaped our understanding of one of the most important events in human history. PhD historian and specialist Patrick Wyman brings the cutting edge of history to listeners in plain, relatable English.
 
Footnoting History is a bi-weekly podcast series dedicated to overlooked, popularly unknown, and exciting stories plucked from the footnotes of history. For further reading suggestions, information about our hosts, our complete episode archive, and more visit us at FootnotingHistory.com!
 
The Irish History Podcast brings you on a journey through Ireland's fascinating past. This podcast is not just dates but an enthralling account of Ireland's history, looking at daily life through the ages. The show is currently focused on the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s (see below), while the archive contains the stories of Ireland's ancient High Kings, Viking raiders and the Norman Invasion of the Middle Ages. The story of the Great Famine has proved the most popular to date,Between 184 ...
 
A fast-moving history of the western world from the ancient world to the present day. Examine how the emergence of the western world as a global dominant power was not something that should ever have been taken for granted. This podcast traces the development of western civilization starting in the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome, past the collapse of the Western Roman Empire into the Dark Ages, and then follows European and, ultimately, American history as the western world moved ...
 
Serial killers. Gangsters. Gunslingers. Victorian-era murderers. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. Each week, the Most Notorious podcast features true-life tales of crime, criminals, tragedies and disasters throughout history. This is an interview show, spotlighting authors and historians who have studied their subjects for years, and whose stories are offered with unique insight, detail, and historical accuracy.
 
Sharing the History of The Viking Age, one podcast at a time. We are covering the History of Scandinavia during the Viking Age. We're exploring Raiding, Trading and Settlement of Scandinavians abroad as well as the culture and society of the Norse homelands. Join us to learn more than you ever thought you wanted to know about the people, for better or worse, history knows as the Vikings.
 
An audio platform for the study of the pre-modern Islamic(ate) past and beyond. We interview academics, archivists and artists on their work for peers and junior students in the field. We aim to educate, inspire, perhaps infuriate, and on the way entertain a little too. Suitable also for general listeners with an interest in geographically diverse medieval history.
 
The Indian subcontinent is about the size of Europe and is way more diverse and complicated - but how much do we know about its violent past? The land of Gandhi is also the land of the war-elephant, of gunpowder-wielding infantry, and of nuclear weapons that destroy everything in their wake. In Yuddha, Anirudh Kanisetti (host of Echoes of India: A History Podcast) and Aditya Ramanathan explore the darker, blood-splattered side of India, beyond Bollywood and school textbooks. From the medieva ...
 
Some of the greatest stories buried in the folds of history...until now. A podcast that uncovers the lifetimes and achievements of prolific warlords from ancient and medieval times. Going beyond the mainstream historical figures that everyone is familiar with, providing a thorough account of lesser known warriors and leaders that were titans during their respective ages.
 
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Were medieval attitudes to sex really that different from our own? Historian Katherine Harvey speaks to Elinor Evans about the sex lives of ordinary people in the Middle Ages – from how sexuality was governed by ideas about sin, to the “love magic” that was thought to trick people into bed. (Ad) Katherine Harvey is the author of The Fires of Lust: …
 
Today I talked to Anne F. Harris. Anne wears two hats: she's a medieval art historian and president of Grinnell College. We talked about her new book Medieval Art 250-1450: Matter, Making, and Meaning (Oxford University Press, 2021), which she co-authored with Nancy M. Thompson. We also discussed the significance and relevance of Medieval art today…
 
During his 40-year career, Edward Burtynsky has photographed the planet's changing landscape, everything from large-scale mining operations in Sudbury to plastic landfills in Nairobi. The renowned photographer recently delivered a virtual talk for the Ontario Heritage Trust and spoke with IDEAS host Nahlah Ayed about what he's seen, where he's been…
 
In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Steve Twomey speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the immediate run-up to the attack, revealing how inch-perfect Japanese planning and complacent oversights by American military figures combined to leave Pearl Harbor naval base a sitting duck for Japanese bombers. See acast.com/privacy…
 
In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Dayna Barnes speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the United States in the years and months leading up to the attack. They discuss the American perspective on the disintegrating relationship with Japan, get to grips with US thinking on the eve of the attack, and ask: why was the Americ…
 
How do terror and popularity merge under a dictatorship? How did the Gestapo deal with critics of Nazism? Based on hundreds of secret police case files, Enemies of the People explores the day-to-day reality of political policing under Hitler. Examining the Gestapo's policy of 'selective enforcement', J. Ryan Stackhouse challenges the abiding percep…
 
Continuing a spectacular run of military successes, King Philip II of Macedon leads his army to erase Methone off the map, the last Athenian city near Macedonia's domains. Allowing Philip to focus on the expansion of his kingdom, including a campaign into Greece that abruptly ends with a humbling defeat against Phocis. Forcing Philip to retreat and…
 
Queen Cynethryth of Mercia was one of the most distinguished rulers of Anglo Saxon Britain. Wife to King Offa, ruler of the Mercians (the most powerful kingdom in Anglo-Saxon Britain) and the only woman to have coinage minted in her image. So how did she end up in Cookham Monastery in Berkshire? After the exciting excavation and discovery of the mo…
 
PhD student Mariah Cooper dusted off 800-year-old court documents from medieval England to find that convictions for sexual assault from that period are on par with convictions for sexual assault today. Her thesis demonstrates remarkably consistent representations of survivors of sexual assault dating from the Middle Ages right to the 21st century.…
 
In the Middle Ages, making it to Sainthood was a tedious process. Though, being murdered in the Canterbury Cathedral was a good starting point. Lucie Laumonier interviews Tristan Taylor on his research into the so-called South English Legendaries, a collection of saints’ lives drafted from the thirteenth century. You can support this podcast and Me…
 
Historian David M Kennedy answers listener questions and online search queries about the Great Depression, the economic crash that devastated the United States and other countries across the globe in the 1930s. In discussion with Rhiannon Davies, he covers topics ranging from the fate of minorities to the staggering unemployment statistics of the t…
 
Robert Sackville-West describes attempts to identify the bodies of the dead after the devastating battles of the First World War Historian Robert Sackville-West describes the searches to identify – and in some cases, return – bodies of the dead after the devastating battles of the First World War: a service that provided important closure for many …
 
Ibn ʿArabī was an Andalusian Muslim scholar, mystic, poet, and philosopher. He is renowned among practitioners of Sufism by the names al-Shaykh al-Akbar ("the Greatest Shaykh"; from here the Akbarian school derives its name). Timestamps 01:36 Ibn ʿArabī was born in 1165 in Andalusia whose literary history we covered in episode 35. What do we know a…
 
Battles, murders, and forgotten treasures - the Burgundians lived life like an episode of Game of Thrones. Once one of the most powerful kingdoms in Western Europe, they are now known as a vanished empire. This week Matt is joined by historian and author Bart van Loos to discuss who exactly were the Burgundians, their contribution to history and cu…
 
Today I sit down with renowned expert Michael Foley as we talk all things Johnny Cash in his new book: Citizen Cash: The Political Life and Times of Johnny Cash. This was definitely something different from me but who doesn't love a little "Ring of Fire" now and again? Buy the book here: https://www.basicbooks.com/titles/michael-stewart-foley/citiz…
 
From brawn to plum pottage, Annie Gray takes us back to the raucous world of festive feasting in the medieval and Tudor eras. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the first episode in our new mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on subversive merrymaking, spectacular dinnertime entertainments and hefty meat pies. (Ad) Annie G…
 
According to US Secretary of War Henry Stimson, the "most shocking single event" of World War II was not the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, but rather the fall of France in spring 1940. Michael Neiberg offers a dramatic history of the American response--a policy marked by panic and moral ineptitude, which placed the United States in league with f…
 
“Either the most ingenious and elaborate hoax ever played upon the public, or else... an event in human history which may in the future appear to have been epoch-making…” With these words, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, creator of Sherlock Holmes, presented to the world five photographs, declared to be genuine and featuring unmistakable images of real fai…
 
"What history is it full of, you ask? Jack the Ripper history." In this episode, I will discuss the Jack the Ripper murders as they relate to the board game Letters from Whitechapel. Sources mentioned in the episode. Philip Sugden, The Complete History of Jack the Ripper Please rate, review and subscribe if you liked the podcast. For more informati…
 
The Enlightenment is often either praised as the wellspring of modern egalitarianism or condemned as the cradle of scientific racism. How should we make sense of this paradox? The Color of Equality: Race and Common Humanity in Enlightenment Thought (U Pennsylvania Press, 2021) is the first book to investigate both the inclusive language of common h…
 
On November 2nd, 1892 a ten-year-old boy named Anton Woode led a hunter to a secluded area of woods a few miles north of Denver, Colorado and shot him dead. Local papers would nickname him "The Boy Murderer". My guest is Dick Kreck, author of "Anton Woode: Boy Murderer". His book can be purchased here: https://www.amazon.com/Anton-Woode-Murderer-Di…
 
Built in the 1720s, Derwentcote is the earliest and most complete steel-making furnace in Britain. We’re joined by Properties Historian Andrew Roberts and Volunteer Manager, Sophie Hearn to learn about the history of the furnace, its place within England’s steel-making history and how its story is being brought back to life for visitors today. For …
 
Many medieval people were hugely invested in finding ways to organize and share what they knew about the world, including one influential translator from England. This week, Danièle speaks with Dr. Emily Steiner about John Trevisa and how his work on medieval compendia influenced history. You can get Danièle's book How to Live Like a Monk with a 20…
 
In 1929, a disagreement over the meaning of "nothing" exposed deep divisions in Western philosophy and erupted into a debate over whether philosophy is more art or science. Poet-philosopher Martin Heidegger's lecture about nothing excited students and divided colleagues. But the empiricist Rudolf Carnap thought all this talk of the meaning of nothi…
 
In the first episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Chris Harding speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about Japan in the years running up to December 1941. They discuss the long-running historical factors that edged the country ever closer to war with the United States, and ask: what led Japan to embark on such a risky gamble? See acast.com/p…
 
King Æthelred of England really did not have the wherewithal to successfully deal with the Danish/English tension that he had inherited with the throne, which had been caused by Viking raids for about 100 years, notably established by what the English called The Great Heathen Army, which took over much of England. Oh, too bad. One solution, he thou…
 
YUDDHA is going on a mid-season break as Anirudh and Aditya are struggling with a sudden invasion of responsibilities from their day jobs (and Anirudh's very exciting first book!) More in this brief episode. YUDDHA is made possible thanks to the support of the Takshashila Institution and the Independent and Public Spirited Media Foundation. Notes a…
 
Colour has been hugely important to humans through history, with different cultures attaching their own meanings to all the hues of the rainbow. From the ancient societies who venerated purple to the modern political radicals who chose red as the colour of revolution, James Fox speaks to Rhiannon Davies about these fascinating associations. (Ad) Ja…
 
Shao-yun Yang's The Way of the Barbarians: Redrawing Ethnic Boundaries in Tang and Song China (University of Washington Press, 2019) challenges assumptions that the cultural and socioeconomic watershed of the Tang-Song transition (800–1127 CE) was marked by a xenophobic or nationalist hardening of ethnocultural boundaries in response to growing for…
 
Herculaneum Uncovered is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Andrew Wallace-Hadrill, Director of Research and Honorary Professor of Roman Studies in the Faculty of Classics at the University of Cambridge. This wide-ranging conversation covers his fascinating archeological work done in Herculaneum and Pompeii, the poli…
 
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