show episodes
 
With most of the entirety of the published journal's contents read aloud by the authors, the FENCE audiobook/podcast continues to push boundaries in literary publishing. In continuous publication since 1998, Fence is a biannual print journal of poetry, fiction, art, and criticism that redefines the terms of accessibility by publishing challenging writing distinguished by idiosyncrasy and intelligence rather than by allegiance with camps, schools, or cliques. FENCE is committed to publishing ...
 
The Arts & Culture series enriches our community with imagination and creativity. Whether reinventing the classics for a new audience or presenting an innovative new art form, these events are aimed at expanding horizons. From poetry to music to storytelling, this series leaves our audiences inspired, encouraged, and seeing the world with new eyes.
 
Loading …
show series
 
Sometimes it feels like we’re living the same day over and over again. We wake up in the same bed, eat the same breakfast, do the same tasks, and talk to the same people, just coasting along and going through the motions. Taking a vacation can offer a temporary break from the mundane; at the same time, it only reinforces the sameness of daily life.…
 
On this week’s episode of The Waves, historian and original Waves host, Marcia Chatelain is joined by sociologist Danielle Lindemann to talk all things reality TV. They discuss Danielle’s new book, True Story: What Reality TV Says About Us and why we don’t take reality television as seriously as we should. Later in the show they talk about why wome…
 
On this episode: Elizabeth and Zak are joined by Amber O’Neal Johnston. She’s the author of A Place to Belong: Celebrating Diversity and Kinship in the Home and Beyond and has a blog called Heritage Mom. They talk about how families can celebrate their own identities while learning about and appreciating other people’s races and cultural difference…
 
The time is 6:51 pm, eastern daylight savings time, May 14, 2022, lull in covid, spring. The location is a non-profit library and workspace, Wendy's Subway, located at 379 Bushwick Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11206. The speakers you will hear are Rebecca Wolff, Ariana Reines, Sade, and Harmony Holiday. Ariana will be reading from her new manuscript-in-progre…
 
Join Town Hall Seattle Writer-in-Residence Sarah Salcedo, author John Wiswell, and author Ross Showalter for a virtual-only event as they share their short fiction and discuss the power of stories, creative processes, and the beauty and difficulties inherent in bringing their disabilities into their own work. Sarah Salcedo is an award-winning filmm…
 
When Samantha and her husband moved from a condo to a fairly large house, they knew they’d have a lot of updating and upkeep to do. But they had no idea how much time their new chores would gobble up. Or even what chores to do. (If only there was a guide to adulting!) Even when they weren’t holding themselves to picture-perfect standards, it still …
 
On this episode: Jamilah, Elizabeth, and Zak talk about the wave of anti-trans legislation, the role of misinformation in this movement, and how to protect trans kids. They are joined by Jules Gill-Peterson. She is a trans historian and author of Histories of the Transgender Child, and co-host of Slate’s very own Outward podcast. Recommendations Ja…
 
With one million dead from COVID, many Americans are suffering through profound grief. And for Black Americans, the pandemic combined with the racial reckoning has made the mourning feel endless. On this week’s episode of A Word, Jason Johnson talks with writer Marisa Renee Lee about her new book Grief Is Love: Living With Loss, and about making sp…
 
On the first stop of the “Las cuatro esquinas Tour” around the United States, Dr. Adriana Pacheco and Seattle Escribe bring together a panel of key players in education, culture, and literature to discuss names, topics, trends and voices in literature by writers of hispanic heritage and their impact on the culture. The literature of writers from Sp…
 
This week, host June Thomas talks to Hannah Kirshner, author of Water, Wood, and Wild Things: Learning Craft and Cultivation in a Japanese Mountain Town. In the interview, Hannah explains how her original plan to write a cookbook turned into an immersive reporting experience, where she practiced and documented multiple artisanal disciplines, like s…
 
You’ve probably heard about the importance of journaling, putting thoughts on paper to help process the daily vicissitudes of life. But it’s easy to stall once you see a blank page or get self conscious about what exactly you’re writing. On this episode of How To!, we bring together Anna Quindlen, bestselling novelist and author of the new book Wri…
 
When we think of method acting, we tend to think of actors going a little over the top for a role – like Jared Leto, who allegedly sent his colleagues dead rats when he was preparing to be The Joker, or Robert De Niro refusing to break character on the set of the movie Raging Bull. But that’s not how method acting began. On this episode of Decoder …
 
Examples of Northwest Coast art appear in museums and collections throughout our region, but what does it mean when there is no word for “art” in the language of the people who created it? How might the Indigenous definition of art be far more expansive — demonstrating rich kinship connections and manifesting spiritual power — than a non-Indigenous…
 
David Plotz talks with author Amy Bloom about her journey to support the death, by suicide, of her husband, chronicled in her new book In Love: A Memoir of Love and Loss. Tweet us your questions @SlateGabfest or email us at gabfest@slate.com. (Messages could be quoted by name unless the writer stipulates otherwise.) Podcast production by Jocelyn Fr…
 
Jonathan Galassi is an acclaimed poet, translator, and longtime publisher at Farrar, Straus and Giroux who has built a life around the art of language. His poetry, described as “direct and plain-spoken,” by The New York Times, is known for illuminating the human experience and its multitudes, from nature and fatherhood to love and partnership. In a…
 
Frances Kai-Hwa Wang is a prolific writer, passionate speaker, multicultural educator, and activist on Asian Pacific American issues. In her new collection of essays, You Cannot Resist Me When My Hair Is in Braids, she navigated the space between cultures and reflects on lessons learned from both Asian American elders and young multiracial children…
 
When the Hart-Celler Act passed in 1965, opening up U.S. immigration to non-Europeans, it ushered in a whole new era. But even to the first generation of Asian Americans born in the U.S. after that milestone, it would have been impossible to imagine that sushi and boba would one day be beloved by all, that a Korean boy band named BTS would be the b…
 
Growing up as an autistic and legally blind person, actor Mickey Rowe was told that he couldn’t be a part of the mainstream world. As Rowe navigated adulthood, he was ignored and misunderstood by classmates and colleagues, infantilized by theatre directors, and even barred from earning minimum wage, all because he is autistic. But for Rowe, the str…
 
It’s no surprise that fair, equitable, and respectful practices bolster engagement and motivation in the workplace. Being inclusive is, quite simply, the right thing to do. But we’re notoriously bad at it. Why? As Ruchika Tulshyan explained in her new book, Inclusion on Purpose: An Intersectional Approach to Creating a Culture of Belonging at Work,…
 
We Need a Reckoning is a deeply powerful collection of poetry, essays, and memoir by women and non-binary people of color in the Tacoma, Washington area. Organized into five parts — wind, soil, water, sky, and breath – and featuring creative writing by thirty-one contributors, the collection is simultaneously a rallying cry for the land and people …
 
Elizabeth Cady Stanton is a famous suffragette who demanded a woman’s right to vote. Margaret Sanger was a sex educator who popularized the term “birth control” and helped establish the precursor of Planned Parenthood. Sheryl Sandberg is the COO of Facebook and has told women to pursue their dreams by leaning in. They’re all celebrated feminists. H…
 
The best-selling Boeing 737 plane took its first commercial flight in 1968. Since then, the aircraft has been updated and modified across four generations; the most recent being the 737 MAX, officially put into service in 2017. Not long after, in 2018 and 2019, two tragic crashes resulted in the deaths of 346 people, and flights of the 737 MAX were…
 
In 1962, Summit Magazine tantalized readers with a tale of the Riesenstein peaks, a majestic (and untamed) mountain range in British Columbia. The article described the lofty granite walls and wondered allowed who would be the first to attempt to climb it. If you’ve never heard of the Riesenstein peaks, it’s because they don’t exist. Three mountain…
 
Town Hall is thrilled to once again partner with Gage Academy of Art to bring audiences a series of talks that explore the remarkable creative work of four Washington artists. Annie Han and Daniel Mihalyo of Lead Pencil Studio are known for building entirely new worlds that explore the limits of physical space and challenge human perception. Conduc…
 
The human face is a marvel. Just try to imagine the map of information contained in its creases and folds: the face holds stories of history, heritage, and emotion. Yet, despite the reverence deserved by such a wondrous bit of human biology, there are countless ways to try and “fix” faces. Digital filters smooth and blur; surgical procedures tighte…
 
Alex Tizon (1959-2017) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer who built a career telling the stories of people at the margins. The underdogs. The forgotten ones. Everyday people. Immigrants, criminals, and folks on the fringe. Tizon believed that every human had a story to tell; they only needed to be invited to share it. In Invisible People: Stories …
 
Did video really kill the radio star? There’s no doubt that the expansion of visual technology played a huge role in the evolution of communications and entertainment, but consider the modern successes of podcasts and music streaming services. With over 2 million podcasts in existence and over 400 million people worldwide subscribers to some form o…
 
When tackling topics of systemic racism, it’s all too easy to build narratives centered around white men and toxic masculinity. But white women have long held seats at the table— from their pre-Civil War ability to buy and sell enslaved people to the million-plus women members of the KKK, and beyond— as systems of white supremacy were built and mai…
 
Anatole France once said, “Until one has loved an animal a part of one’s soul remains unawakened.” Susan Orlean’s soul has been awake for a very long time, indeed. The award-winning author brings forth On Animals, a collection of writings about our relationship with animals, done throughout her illustrious career. Orlean brought a keen eye and a wa…
 
How old were you when you got your first cell phone? Did “going online” ever involve listening to a series of pained squeaks and static, willing the family PC to connect to…whatever it is it connected to? Today, children are presented with a sparkling array of digital tools that many of us could barely fathom as kids. How are parents and caregivers…
 
It’s been a watershed year. Social justice, and all that it means to us, is both in our grasp and slipping through our fingers. Seattle journalist Marcus Harrison Green, a dear friend and frequent collaborator with Town Hall Seattle, knows this well. Growing up black in South Seattle, Green has seen both the sharp rise of the Black Lives Matter mov…
 
Phyllis Wheatley, the first African-American author of a published book of poetry, wrote, “Imagination! Who can sing thy force?/Or who describe the swiftness of thy course?”. Wheatley could very well have been calling to the Black creatives, writers, orators, and leaders who would follow her. The imaginative force of Malcolm X and Toni Morrison, Ja…
 
Fence Sounds – 3.5 Season 3, Episode 5, with readings from contributors to the Fence Literary Journal Double print Issue, number 37 slash 38, produced by our Editor-in-Chief, Rebecca Wolff. I’m Jason Zuzga, one of the Nonfiction and Other editors of Fence the print journal, I’m also an editor of one of Fence’s online publication arms, Fence Steamin…
 
In Hungary, one summer’s night in 1969, Judy Temes’ family packed the car for, what was supposed to be, a vacation to Vienna. Judy’s parents took her 12-year-old brother and left her behind. She was five-years-old and was given to her grandmother. Her family wasn’t taking a vacation. They were escaping Hungary’s totalitarian regime. Her father, a d…
 
Welcome to Fence Sounds, Season 3, Episode 3, with readings from the Fence Double print issue, number 37/38 Spring Summer 2021. I’m Jason Zuzga, one of the Nonfiction and Other editors of Fence the print journal, I’m also an editor of one of Fence’s online publication arms, Fence Steaming, found at fenceportal.org. Online at fencedigital.com we als…
 
In the beginning there was a bit. And then the pixel: a particular packaging of those bits. With the coming of the pixel, the organizing principle of most all modern media. Nearly every picture in the world is now composed of pixels: cell phone photos and Mars Rover transmissions, book illustrations and video games. Pixels and digital images are no…
 
Featuring the work of FENCE 37/38 contributors. Season 3, Episode 3. In this episode, we open with Erik Kennedy’s prose piece entitled "The Please Stop Killing Us And Destroying Everything that Sustains Us Society." After, Randy Prunty reads poems "Earth Elegy: Low Tide" and "Earth Elegy, Amateurs." Next up is Hillary Plum, reading poems “Canal” an…
 
Have you ever visited the defunct coal chutes on Capitol Hill? Do you know where you can find a 100-year-old sidewalk or the nearest pocket park? Susanna Ryan, local cartoonist and creator of Seattle Walk Report, was joined by Crosscut’s Knute “Mossback” Berger for a fresh look at Seattle’s hidden historical gems. Ryan gave us a preview of her new …
 
Featuring the work of FENCE 37/38 contributors. In this episode, we begin with the poet Delicia Daniels, reading with the eerie lulling sound of the sea from poems based on chilling research into antebellum law archives. Next up is Jordan E. Franklin, reading the exuberant poem, "Sometime in January (after David Bowie)." Josh May reads a poem. Josh…
 
Featuring the work of FENCE 37/38 contributors. The poems "celery" and "What's Wrong with?" by Stine An, "Lover's Trilogy" by Zosia Wiatr, "Lil Miquela," "Sunnyvale," "Bad Actors," and "Confessionalisms" by Caitlyn Tella. poems " The story "As Something Breaks" by Sara Duff. Also including the music of KIKA, whose numerous songs, such as the two in…
 
At first sight of Frida Kahlo’s painting The Two Fridas, author Emily Rapp Black felt an instant connection with the artist. An amputee from childhood, Rapp Black grew up with a succession of prosthetic limbs, and learned she had to hide her disability from the world. Kahlo sustained lifelong injuries after a horrific bus crash and her own right le…
 
In postwar America, there was arguably no newspaper comic strip more recognizable than Charles Schulz’s Peanuts. It was everywhere, not just in thousands of daily newspapers. For nearly fifty years, Peanuts was a mainstay of American popular culture in television, movies, and merchandising, from the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade to the White House…
 
From Homer to Helen Keller, from Dune to Stevie Wonder, from the invention of Braille to the science of echolocation. What is the common thread between them? In this stunningly personal and informative presentation, writer and educator M. Leona Godin explored the fascinating history of blindness, interweaving it with her own story of gradually losi…
 
In Living Color: Angie Rubio Stories, author Donna Miscolta traced the social education that a Mexican American girl receives as she experiences and responds to microaggressions and systemic racism in and out of school. Unfortunately, though Living Color is fiction, many of the incidents depicted in Angie Rubio’s life are inspired or derived from M…
 
To hyphenate or not to hyphenate, that is the question. It has been a central point of controversy since before the imprinting of the first Gutenberg Bible. And yet, the hyphen has persisted, bringing and bridging new words and concepts. In conversation with Rich Smith, Associate Editor of The Stranger, academic and anthropologist Pardis Mahdavi sh…
 
Throughout history, humans have been driven by the quest for two cherished ideals: community and freedom. The two don’t coexist easily. We value individuality and self-reliance, yet are utterly dependent on community for our most basic needs, a fact which has never been more clear than over the last year. Bestselling author Sebastian Junger created…
 
“Chickens are a lot more mainstream than veganism and a little bit like kombucha: super weird twenty years ago, now somewhat more popular and made even more so by logos, brands, and hashtags.” So begins Gina Warren’s book Hatched: Dispatches from the Backyard Chicken Movement. In this presentation that is part memoir, part food and sustainability d…
 
One thing that seems to be true in all generations of American life is that it can be challenging to summon the courage to follow your dreams in a material world. In this conversation with writers Eric M. Johnson and Thomas McGuane, they considered this difficulty paralleled with their own work and lives. Through the lens of Johnson’s debut novel—a…
 
The United States is the only country in the world that sentences thirteen and fourteen-year old offenders, mostly youth of color, to life in prison without parole, regardless of the scientifically proven singularities of the developing adolescent brain. In 1991, Ian Manuel, then fourteen, was sentenced to life without parole for a non-homicide cri…
 
Paul Shoemaker believes America is approaching a looming inflection point. The author and social impact leader says that the massive upheavals over the last year is emblematic of how the social, economic, and health challenges facing us in the 2020s are radically different from those we faced even one generation ago. But far from feeling downtrodde…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login