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Science, pop culture and comedy collide on StarTalk Radio! Astrophysicist and Hayden Planetarium director Neil deGrasse Tyson, his comic co-hosts, guest celebrities and scientists discuss astronomy, physics, and everything else about life in the universe. Keep Looking Up! New episodes premiere Monday nights at 7pm ET.
 
Brain Science makes recent discoveries in neuroscience accessible to listeners of all backgrounds with an emphasis on how these discoveries are unraveling the mystery of how our brains make us human. Host Ginger Campbell, MD interviews scientists to give you a first hand look at how science is really done. Full show notes and episode transcripts are available at http://brainsciencepodcast.com.
 
The surprising connections in science and technology that give you the Big Picture. Astronomer Seth Shostak and science journalist Molly Bentley are joined each week by leading researchers, techies, and journalists to provide a smart and humorous take on science. Our regular "Skeptic Check" episodes cast a critical eye on pseudoscience.
 
Want proof of life after death? Your loved ones may be physically gone but they still exist and you will see them again...your pets don't die either. Each episode of We Don't Die you'll hear the experiences of men and women, and why they believe life after death is REAL and why your life on earth is important. Join your host, Sandra Champlain, author of the #1 international bestseller, We Don't Die - A Skeptic's Discovery of Life After Death, for podcast episodes that aim to give you goosebu ...
 
Tree zealot Casey Clapp and tree agnostic Alex Crowson review and rate your favorite arboreal friends. A semi-educational, basically pleasant, and fully unnecessary romp through the annals of treedom. Follow us on Instagram @arbortrarypod Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/completely-arbortrary/support
 
The Data Skeptic Podcast features interviews and discussion of topics related to data science, statistics, machine learning, artificial intelligence and the like, all from the perspective of applying critical thinking and the scientific method to evaluate the veracity of claims and efficacy of approaches.
 
What would happen if you fell into a black hole? How big is the universe? Just what the heck is a quasar, anyway? You've got questions, and astrophysicist Paul Sutter has the answers! Submit questions via Twitter using #AskASpaceman or post to facebook.com/PaulMattSutter. Every week you will come closer to COMPLETE KNOWLEDGE OF TIME AND SPACE!
 
In Season 2 of the series we will share a new collection of surprising and unusual stories from the history of science. In each episode we will feature two seemingly unrelated stories from the past. Then, Dan Riskin will connect the dots between those stories and offer insight into how that history impacts modern medical research. We are learning from the past so we can understand the present, and inform the future. Along the way we will learn how a professor at Stanford turned mild mannered ...
 
Are you searching for great stories to ignite your curiosity, teach you to perform better in life and career, inspire your mind, and make you laugh along the way? In this science podcast, Dr. Marie McNeely introduces you to the brilliant researchers behind the latest scientific discoveries. Join us as they share their greatest failures, most staggering successes, candid career advice, and what drives them forward in life and science. Our website with show notes]] Greetings science fans! We’r ...
 
Life Science Today is your source for stories, insights, and trends across the life science industry. Expect weekly highlights about new technologies, pharmaceutical mergers and acquisitions, news about the moves of venture capital and private equity, and how the stock market responds to biotech IPOs. Life Science Today also explores trends around clinical research, including the evolving patterns that determine how drugs and therapies are developed and approved. It’s news, with a dash of pe ...
 
"The Long Run" Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton, if he were alive, would appreciate biotech. Today’s scientific entrepreneurs must be ready for the “hazardous journey, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful, honor and recognition in case of success.” Today, the men and women who strive to apply science for the betterment of human health have a historic opportunity. They need stamina, and resilience, to achieve something meaningful. Biotech’s ...
 
Back Bay Life Science Advisors brings you expert insights from our advisors and investment bankers in the world of BioPharma & MedTech. On this podcast, you’ll hear from our experts in life science development, commercialization, and investment banking, scientific investigators, biotech and medtech executives, physicians, and strategists who excel at guiding global life sciences companies and their investors through complex decisions. Join us for insights generated from in-depth scientific, ...
 
Join award-winning neurologists and researchers, Drs. Dean and Ayesha Sherzai, for a fun, innovative and inspirational approach to brain health and all matters concerning the remarkable human mind. This is the century of the brain, a time when our insights into this incredible organ are exploding at an unprecedented pace. Explore ways to take control of your own brain health, avoid chronic diseases that are devastating communities worldwide, and expand your mind's capacity beyond anything yo ...
 
'Simply blooming' formerly Budai are a collaboration of people in many forms sharing co-creatively infinite soundless to sound frequencies of vibrational adventures. Always open in expansion, shifting, oscillating but most of all ‘being’ exhilarated in a life that shares infinity, immersing into infinite sound waves connected to conscious growth always.
 
This is Politics & Life Sciences (PLS) Radio which is an interplay of Life Sciences and Politics. I am your host Dean L. Fanelli, Ph.D. I am an Intellectual Property attorney in Washington, DC. My practice focuses on issues attendant to the Life Sciences industry. On PLS, we will explores cutting edge topics involving the Biotech and Pharma ecosystems and looks at political or governmental policy issues affecting the Biotech and Pharma industries. Each week, PLS will have amazing guests incl ...
 
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show series
 
In this episode, Ayesha talks about a new study from UCSF that shows how physical activity can maintain brain health in older individuals. The research shows that exercise increases levels of synaptic proteins in the brain involved in maintaining and strengthening neuronal connections. The researchers also found these proteins could be protective e…
 
Antibiotics act as a safety net for all of healthcare. They make medical procedures such as surgeries, childbirth and cancer treatments possible, but what happens when bacteria or other microorganisms become resistant to the drugs we use against them? Back Bay Life Science Advisors’ Managing Director Peter Bak sits down with Marc Lemonnier, a molec…
 
I am hopeful that we will be getting back to normal soon. That means more in-person events. Bonni Scepkowski, Founder at Stellar Meetings and Events, has some thoughts about how to make the most of your time together whether with your team or your customers. Why have a meeting at all? The most essential reason is to build relationships. We know now…
 
Oncology partners, Parkinson’s partners, expanded European Commission, expanded FDA, and bacterial vaccines Find out more at https://LifeScienceTodayPodcast.com Story References Scorpion & AstraZeneca ABL & Sanofi Vertex Cochlear Vaxcyte About the Show Life Science Today is your source for stories, insights, and trends across the life science indus…
 
Dr. Jon Butterworth is a Professor of Physics at University College London. He works on the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Geneva. They are smashing particles together at extremely high energies and measuring what happens. Collecting data on these particle collisions provides information about the smallest and most basic components of our univers…
 
The relationship between researchers and funders is complicated. Some people think that researchers should be left to their own direction and that all financial support should be ‘no-strings attached.’ But is that possible? Is it desirable? We look at how the Roman Coliseum was funded, and ask ‘what impact did that have on its design and its use?’ …
 
When's the best time to start a new habit? And what makes some stick while others fall by the wayside? Behavioral scientist Katy Milkman's new book, How to Change, breaks down the research about how to leverage human nature instead of working against it to achieve your goals. (This episode originally aired in May 2021.)…
 
COSA Poll: Majority of voters support bill to block Biden's vaccine mandate Under the constitutional system the Founders constructed, Congress would be the sole body theoretically capable of issuing a nationwide vaccine mandate. This is not to say they would have the power to do so, only that Congress is the only body constitutionally charged with …
 
It is a long road to become an anesthesiologist – four years of medical school and another four years of postgraduate training and residency. To subspecialize in cardiac anesthesiology requires at least one more year. And Dr. Jonathan Lessin, our guest today, did all of that before he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in his late 30’s, forcing…
 
For fans of sushi, sashimi, and tuna steaks on the grill, we have some good news. Four species of tuna have rebounded in recent years, lowering the threat of extinction. An agency of the United Nations monitors the health of more than 138,000 species of life -- in the oceans and on land. And every few years, it takes a new look at each species. Man…
 
Dr Chris Smith and the Naked Scientists look at why the government thinks now is the right time to ditch Covid Plan B?Also, how can your brain tell the difference between noises it can ignore, and ones that should be alarming when you are asleep?We’re exploring the world of robotics, what does it involve and how can we use the technology to improve…
 
Volcanoes are fascinating, devastating, and fundamental to Earth systems. Volcanic eruptions can transform ecosystems, landscapes, and even the atmosphere, and at their most extreme, the effects of volcanism can be global and long-lasting. In this overstuffed episode, we discuss the many forms and features of volcanic activity, and we take a look a…
 
Shermer and Satel discuss: how political correctness has corrupted medicine, how wokeness and social justice activism has corrupted psychiatry, what is social justice and who is really practicing it? medical models of mental illness and addiction and why mental illness is so hard to treat, addictions to porn and social media, why some people are ab…
 
https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/sciencesalon/mss243_Sally_Satel_2022_1_7.mp3 Download MP3 Dr. Sally Satel is a visiting professor of psychiatry at Columbia University’s Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons, a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a lecturer at Yale University School of Medicine, and a practicing psychiatrist. Sh…
 
How do you make snow? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O’Reilly learn some cold, hard facts about snow and ice with atmospheric scientist and snow maker Peter Veals, PhD and glacial scientist Twila Moon, PhD. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Thanks to our Patron…
 
This Week: Error Free Quantum Computing?, Billions Of Black Holes, Concussion Urine, Poo Pills For People, Antifreeze Mice, Ribosome Disruption, COVID Update, Helpful Neighbors?, US Tiger Problem, Martian Life?, Bone-Building Bots, And Much More... The post 19 January, 2022 – Episode 859 – Within the Margin of Error appeared first on This Week in S…
 
The effects of the Tonga eruption could be felt around the world, many heard the boom of a sonic shock, and tsunami waves travelled far and wide. Volcanologist Shane Cronin from the University of Auckland in New Zealand is one of only a handful of people to have landed on the tiny islands above the volcano where the eruption took place. Those islan…
 
On this week’s show: Ethical concerns rise with an increase in open brain research, and how sharing saliva can be a proxy for the closeness of a relationship Human brains are protected by our hard skulls, but these bony shields also keep researchers out. With brain surgeries and brain implants on the rise, scientists are getting more chances to exp…
 
Why was the blast from the Hunga-Tonga-Hunga-Ha'apai volcano so explosive? Where are we on the global climatic thermostat? And how you can get involved in the Big Repair Project.Gaia Vince speaks with Auckland University volcanologist Prof Shane Cronin, one of the few human beings to have visited the now-disappeared volcanic land bridge that stretc…
 
KeifeRx is developing a pipeline of orally delivered tyrosine kinase inhibitors to treat neurodegenerative diseases. It has a portfolio of these drugs that it has optimized to penetrate the brain, clear damaged cells, and treat these conditions through the bulk disposal of disease-causing toxic proteins. It believes its approach offers the potentia…
 
What do you do when the way of life that you evolved over millions of years was rendered useless in the blink of an eye? Something very similar to that happened to the Osage-orange (Maclura pomifera) at the end of the Pleistocene epoch, and it wasn't alone. Completely Arbortrary is produced by Alex Crowson and Casey Clapp Artwork - Jillian Barthold…
 
Copper is a metal that has been with us since the dawn of civilisation. The Romans used it to build their empire, and its high thermal and electrical conductivity led to the 19th century discovery of how to generate electricity and a revolution in telecommunications. Copper was even used to build the Statue of Liberty in New York, and it’s because …
 
For those in emerging adulthood, there's endless pressure from all sides to chase an extraordinary standard in every aspect of life. But writer Rainesford Stauffer says the so-called milestones are more unrealistic than ever. Now's the time for creativity and carving your own path — and she's got some tips from her book, An Ordinary Age, to get you…
 
Could the food we eat and the air we breathe be damaging our immune systems? The number of people with autoimmune diseases, from rheumatoid arthritis to type 1 diabetes, began to increase around 40 years ago in the west. Now, some are also emerging in countries that had never seen the diseases before. Ian Sample speaks to genetic scientist and cons…
 
Indigenous peoples represent about five percent of the world’s population—and sustain nearly 80 percent of the world’s biodiversity. This week, Dr. Jessica Hernandez joins Jonathan to discuss the principles of Indigenous science, Indigenous land stewardship, and what it will take to heal Indigenous landscapes. Dr. Jessica Hernandez (Maya Ch’orti’ &…
 
How are globular clusters so old? Where did they come from, and how are they linked to galaxy formation? What makes them so globular, anyway? I discuss these questions and more in today’s Ask a Spaceman! Support the show: http://www.patreon.com/pmsutter All episodes: http://www.AskASpaceman.com Follow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/PaulMattSutt…
 
In this episode of the podcast, Kyle and David interview Andrew Penn: nurse practitioner, Associate Clinical Professor, and Co-founder of OPENurses; a professional organization for nurses interested in psychedelic research. www.psychedelicstoday.com
 
How do diseases and information spread? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice discover the history of pandemics, how social networks impact spread, and the hidden math behind it with sociologist Nicholas Christakis. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://www.start…
 
https://traffic.libsyn.com/secure/sciencesalon/mss242_Jonathan_Gottschall_2021_12_29.mp3 Download MP3 Humans are storytelling animals. Stories are what make our societies possible. Countless books celebrate their virtues. But Jonathan Gottschall, an expert on the science of stories, argues that there is a dark side to storytelling we can no longer …
 
Humans are storytelling animals. Stories are what make our societies possible. Countless books celebrate their virtues. But Jonathan Gottschall, an expert on the science of stories, argues that there is a dark side to storytelling we can no longer ignore. Storytelling, the very tradition that built human civilization, may be the thing that destroys…
 
2022 has been heralded as the golden era of robotics. In this episode of The Naked Scientists you'll see how futuristic machines are already employed throughout industry to make our lives better. This isn't a tech review of Alexa, but instead a glimpse at pinpoint-accurate surgical arms completing tricky operations on human patients and tiny robots…
 
The coronavirus variant has spread across the UK at incredible speed – but there are signs that the wave may have reached its peak. Madeleine Finlay talks to the Guardian science correspondent Nicola Davis about what we can expect in the weeks and months to come, and whether a second ‘exit wave’ could be here in the summer. Help support our indepen…
 
Sean Law, Principle Data Scientist, R&D at a Fortune 500 Company, comes on to talk about his creation of the STUMPY Python Library. Sponsored by Hello Fresh and mParticle: Go to Hellofresh.com/dataskeptic16 for up to 16 free meals AND 3 free gifts! Visit mparticle.com to learn how teams at Postmates, NBCUniversal, Spotify, and Airbnb use mParticle’…
 
Catalytic converters are disappearing. If you’ve had yours stolen, you know that rare earth metals are valuable. But these metals are in great demand for things other than converters, such as batteries for electric cars, wind farms and solar panels. We need rare earth metals to combat climate change, but where to get them? Could we find substitutes…
 
When's the best time to start a new habit? And what makes some stick while others fall by the wayside? Behavioral scientist Katy Milkman's new book, How to Change, breaks down the research about how to leverage human nature instead of working against it to achieve your goals. (This episode originally aired in May 2021.)…
 
Join Miss Beatty while she dives into the fact that dinosaurs had feathers and the evolutionary journey they went on to become birds! This one is interesting, so take a listen! Art by Kirsten Mayer @graphic_nouns Music: Synth Ride by Atlss on Premium Beat Sources: https://theconversation.com/unraveling-the-mystery-of-how-dinosaurs-get-their-names-4…
 
Only one species of penguin lives north of the equator -- and it’s nowhere near the North Pole. Instead, it inhabits the warm, sunny Galapagos Islands, off the coast of South America. But it’s endangered -- its population has dwindled to just a couple of thousand. Without help, it could vanish. The Galapagos penguin is one of more than 5600 species…
 
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