show episodes
 
A podcast for all ancient history fans! The Ancients is dedicated to discussing our distant past. Featuring interviews with historians and archaeologists, each episode covers a specific theme from antiquity. From Neolithic Britain to the Fall of Rome. Hosted by Tristan Hughes.
 
Plutarch’s Greeks and Romans is a bi-weekly podcast inspired by Plutarch’s ancient collection of biographies of famous Grecians and Romans. Plutarch was both a Greek and a Roman citizen living during the Pax Romana - the Golden Age of the Roman Empire. Our podcast will explore 50 persons Plutarch believed were most influential in the rise of Greek and Roman civilization, from legends such as Theseus and Romulus to conquerors like Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar, Plutarch had no shortag ...
 
David Hume is one of the great philosophers of the Western intellectual tradition. His philosophical writings earned him lasting fame and renown; his historical writing earned his bread and butter. His "The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution of 1688", published between 1754 and 1764, was immensely popular and Hume wrote that "the copy-money given me by the booksellers much exceeded any thing formerly known in England; I was become not only independent, bu ...
 
David Hume is one of the great philosophers of the Western intellectual tradition. His philosophical writings earned him lasting fame and renown; his historical writing earned his bread and butter. His "The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution of 1688", published between 1754 and 1764, was immensely popular and Hume wrote that "the copy-money given me by the booksellers much exceeded any thing formerly known in England; I was become not only independent, bu ...
 
Caesar and Cleopatra, a play written in 1898 by George Bernard Shaw, was first staged in 1901 and first published with Captain Brassbound's Conversion and The Devil's Disciple in his 1901 collection, Three Plays for Puritans. It was first performed at Newcastle upon Tyne on March 15, 1899. London production was at the Savoy Theatre in 1907. Shaw wants to prove that it was not love but politics that drew Cleopatra to Julius Caesar. He sees the Roman occupation of ancient Egypt as similar to t ...
 
Writer-director Chris Kublan and actor Michael Rispoli discuss their new comedy Friends and Romans. The comedy follows Nick DeMaio (Rispoli), an aspiring actor who's stuck playing gangsters in mafia films. When he and his fellow mob movie extras stage a production of "Julius Caesar" on Staten Island, they unwittingly attract the FBI's attention—with comical results.
 
The Twelve Caesars is a set of twelve biographies of Julius Caesar and the first 11 emperors of the Roman Empire. The work was written in 121 during the reign of the emperor Hadrian, while Suetonius was Hadrian’s personal secretary. On the Life of the Caesars concentrates on the acts and personalities of the Julio-Claudians and their immediate successors. Together with Tacitus’ Annals, this work is a major source for the historical details in Robert Graves’ novels “I Claudius” and “Claudius ...
 
Though it's titled The Tragedy of Julius Caesar, the man himself appears only in five scenes in the entire play! However, such is his impact on the events that surrounded him that he still remains the central figure in this psychological drama that combines politics, honor, assassination, betrayal, the lust for power, patriotism and friendship. Set in 44 BC in ancient Rome, it is one of William Shakespeare's early Tragedies. First thought to have been performed in September 1599, William Sha ...
 
Shakespeare was passionately interested in the history of Rome, as is evident from plays like Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, and Antony and Cleopatra. His tragedy Coriolanus was probably written around 1605-07, and dramatizes the rise and fall of a great Roman general, Caius Martius (later surnamed Coriolanus because of his military victory at Corioli). This play is unusual in that it provides a strong voice for the ordinary citizens of Rome, who begin the play rioting about the high price ...
 
The AIQ podcast (Antiquity in Question) is an academic podcast on the topic of ancient history. It's goal is to combine an academic approach to topics of the ancient world whilst still being interesting and fun for listeners who know little about history. The AIQ podcast covers topics such as the Romans, classical Greece and important figures in history like Alexander the Great and Julius Caesar. You will listen to and be immersed into the fascinating world of Empires, Leaders and the comple ...
 
Through out time events have occurred that have shaped human history. Spirit voices from the past have many stories to tell. Channelers, Barry and Connie Strohm have been conducting live channeling sessions and relaying those stories and messages from those on the other side. Listen in to the ones that have witnessed history first hand and those that made history themselves.
 
The only podcast to talk about everything from romance novels to totalitarianism. Psychology, philosophy, history, books, film, religion, politics: join hosts Harrison Koehli, Elan Martin, and Adam Daniels for perspectives you won't find anywhere else.
 
'Women and Shakespeare' features conversations with diverse creatives and academics who are involved in making and interpreting Shakespeare. In the conversations, we find out both how Shakespeare is used to amplify the voices of women today and how women are redefining the world's most famous writer. Sponsored by NYU Global Faculty Fund Award.
 
The Roman World introduces students to the society, literature and art of ancient Rome, through a study of its major historical and literary figures, such as Julius Caesar, Augustus, Nero, Virgil and Ovid. We shall look at Rome’s place in the ancient Mediterranean world, and its connections with ancient Greece and other cultures, such as Egypt and Gaul. Through almost constant warfare, Rome accumulated an enormous Mediterranean empire, and this subject will investigate how this shaped Roman ...
 
A treasure trove of more than two hundred poems, this gem of an anthology compiled by Mary E Burt is indeed a most valuable set of poems to read or listen to. Published in 1904, Poems Every Child Should Know contains some well-loved verses like Thomas Gray's Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard, Lewis Carroll's delightful parody Father William, Felicia Hemans' deeply-moving Casablanca and other favorites. It also has lesser-known but equally beautiful pieces like Henry Wadsworth Longfellow' ...
 
This is truly a delightful compilation of some of the best known and loved passages from William Shakespeare's plays. Most readers would be familiar with all or at least some of them. If you've studied Shakespeare in school or college, plays like The Merchant of Venice and Macbeth were probably assigned texts. However, if you haven't encountered these plays before, Shakespeare Monologues is a great volume to browse through and enjoy at leisure. It's important to know that there is a distinct ...
 
We explore ideas and practices once believed to be true but no longer. Each dead idea is explored in all its glorious eccentricity. For example, discover miasma, the theory that plague comes from stinky air; or the medical diagnosis of hysteria, which holds that women's wombs wander around their bodies causing trouble. Join us on a fun romp through the history of ideas that didn’t quite stand the test of time.
 
The French mathematician and philosopher, Blaise Pascal once remarked, “Cleopatra's nose. Had it been shorter, the whole face of the world would have been changed!” Such was the legendary power and attraction of this most famous woman ruler that generations of artists, readers, writers, historians and poets have ensured that she remains immortal and unforgettable. Jacob Abbott's Cleopatra is a work of historical biography, told in a highly dramatic and gripping style. It brings the character ...
 
If you thought history was dull, dry and boring, you haven't read Bill Nye's books! He brings wit, humor, satire, irony and sheer nonsensical fun into the subject, making it both entertaining and memorable. The Comic History of England was published posthumously in 1896 after the writer's tragic and untimely death half-way through the project. Hence it remains incomplete and covers the history of the island nation only up to the Tudor period. However, beginning with Julius Caesar, the Roman ...
 
You Are There is a great early radio program that not only entertained but educated the listener. Reported in first person the show places you the listener back into history to experience history as it unfolded. Reported live you will hear history take place in exciting recreations of histories greatest moments.
 
The third of the series featuring Cyril, Anthea, Robert and Jane: four children who are, as they often say, "the sort of people that wonderful things happen to". In 'Five Children and It' they were lucky enough to meet the magical, wish-granting Psammead - and in this final book they meet him once again. He guides them to an ancient Amulet that will help them find their hearts' desire - but it's only half an amulet, and seeking for the other half has them whizzing about through time on anoth ...
 
Our goal is to spread dad positivity to fathers everywhere. Modern dads face a lot of complex issues and don’t always get the support they need. We want to provide a healthy, uplifting podcast to dads who are looking for a little more, while also having insightful conversations and learning ourselves.
 
Pandemics, violent eruptions, city sackings, egomaniac emperors. Sound familiar? History always repeats itself. Archaeologist host Darius Arya Digs goes back 2000 years to uncover elements of Ancient Rome & its expansive Empire. On location from the back streets of Rome to the bazaar of Cairo, from the Agora of Athens to the Medina of Tunis, and from the Vatican Museums to the Roman emperor Diocletian’s palace of Split. Episodes drop each Monday!
 
François Pierre Guillaume Guizot (1787-1874) was a French historian, orator, and statesman. Guizot was a dominant figure in French politics prior to the Revolution of 1848, actively opposing as a liberal the reactionary King Charles X before his overthrow in the July Revolution of 1830, then in government service to the “citizen king” Louis Philippe, as the Minister of Education, 1832-1837, ambassador to London, Foreign Minister 1840-1847, and finally Prime Minister of France from September ...
 
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Hello everyone and welcome to the Greatest Stories of History Podcast. Season 1, Episode 1 - Julius Caesar. In this podcast episode we began the story of the man that would end the Roman Republic and start the Roman Empire. Julius Caesar was about to change the empire and alter history for the Romans themselves. But where did he start? How did he g…
 
“Let me have men about me that are fat; “Sleek-headed men and such as sleep o' nights: Yond Cassius has a lean and hungry look; He thinks too much: such men are dangerous.” So said Julius Caesar to Mark Antony in Shakespeare's "Tragedy of Julius Caesar." Cassius was indeed dangerous as Caesar discovered on the Ides of March when a group of Senators…
 
On the day of the Euro 2020 final, we’re talking England versus Italy…Ancients style (well, sort of). Historian and archaeologist Dr Simon Elliott returns to the podcast to talk us through Julius Caesar’s two invasions of Britain in 55 and 54 BC. Hear what the Romans knew about Britain before the expedition, why Caesar wanted to invade, and what th…
 
William J MacDonald is one of the creators and executive producers of Rome, and in this wide ranging chat he talks about how the show came about, how the plot could have been very different, and what would have happened if the show hadn’t been cancelled. Raising Standards, an occasional rewatch podcast of HBO’s Rome, hosted by Rhiannon Evans and Ma…
 
In this episode we will explore some of the major cultural achievements of the bronze age: writing, legal codes, religion and astronomy. **Episode Transcript** While Rome Burns is part of the 1up Podcast Network. Find more of our shows at 1upPodcasts.com. Cover Art by Igor Nunes. Find more of his work at Whyccan.artstation.com or contact him on twi…
 
The Theban Sacred Band was one of the greatest military corps of Ancient Greece, thriving from the city-state of Thebes for almost 50 years in the mid 4th century BC. In addition to their fighting prowess, however, there is another fascinating aspect to their history; this 300-man elite corps was made up of 150 pairs of male lovers, many of them bu…
 
As Aeneus becomes increasingly comfortable building Carthage with Queen Dido, the god Mercury appears to him. “You, so now you lay foundation stones for the soaring walls of Carthage! Building her gorgeous city, doting on your wife. Blind to your own realm, oblivious to your fate!” Aeneus is supposed to be headed for Italy to build Rome. Carthago d…
 
In the mid-20th century French archaeologists came across a remarkable collection of ancient items from Eastern China, the Indian subcontinent and the Roman Mediterranean, all in one place. In this second episode about Begram, Tristan is once again joined by the University of Freiburg’s Lauren Morris, who takes us into the details of the lacquerwar…
 
Often known as ‘Britain’s first town’, Colchester is a city rich in ancient history and on 24 July 2021, a new exhibition will open at the Colchester Museum revealing more about some of its earliest Roman occupants. Called ‘Decoding the Roman Dead’, the exhibition focuses around cremations found in the area around Colchester dating to almost 2,000 …
 
As things continue to get worse culturally and politically, it pays to ask oneself how far one will go. What are the limits to my obedience to authority? At what point do I become what I hate? To avoid becoming a monster, the first step is to draw some red lines: things we simply will not do. But will we actually stick to them, or simply go along w…
 
Our miniseries on spies continues! This week, we look at disappeared British frogman Lionel Crabb! To help us clear up these murky waters, we welcome back Mitch Jones (of the Broadcast Geeks podcast). Mitch gets a celebrity VO, Brian shows his love for 90’s pop-punk, and Zach sets a trap. *We recorded this episode using Zoom audio, so apologies for…
 
The Umayyad Caliphate not only held substantial land holdings in the Mediterranean Basin, but they situated their capital in the Basin—in Damascus. Dr Marie Legendre, The University of Edinburgh, joins the show to speak about the caliphate's administration policies and practices.By Ithacabound.com
 
Hello everyone and welcome to the Greatest Stories of History Podcast. In this podcast series we tell the stories of the greatest tales throughout history. From Julius Ceaser, to Napoleon, to the Story of Easy Company. Episodes are released weekly so be sure to tune in to listen. Each tale is told in a series format, starting first with the legend …
 
The story of King David’s tryst with Bathsheba begins with these ominous words, “In the spring of the year, the time when kings go forth to battle, David sent Joab, and his servants with him, and all Israel…. But David remained at Jerusalem.” (2 Samuel 11:1). Just as David remained in Jerusalem “when kings go forth to battle,” the great Roman gener…
 
It was one of the most powerful empires in history, leaving marks and remnants across the globe, but in this episode we are looking specifically at the impact of the Romans on Brittany. Tristan was joined once again by Sir Barry Cunliffe, who takes us through the Roman occupation of Brittany, the response of the residents, and the impact on both cu…
 
Arthur Versluis, professor of religious studies at Michigan State University, is the author of many books and an expert on Western mysticism and esotericism, especially the Christian theosophic tradition. He's also an expert on the intellectual origins of totalitarianism, the subject of his excellent 2006 book, The New Inquisitions. Today on MindMa…
 
This season our podcast will explore a single event in history by analyzing the technology, people, and situations that led to the late Bronze Age Collapse in the near east. We begin with a look at what defines the Bronze Age and what technology these civilizations had which contributed to the prosperity and success of many of these empires during …
 
Evidence shows that Christian monasticism started in the eastern Mediterranean, and more specifically, Egypt. Professor of Medieval History, Dr Andrew Jotischky, Royal Holloway, University of London, returns to the show to discuss the formation of Christian monasticism in the eastern part of the Basin.…
 
480 BC is a year widely-celebrated in Greek history. When Leonidas' Spartan core and their Hellenic allies fought a powerful Persian army at Thermopylae, and an outnumbered, Athenian-led navy defeated a mighty Persian armada at Salamis. Yet it was not just off the coast of Athens that one of antiquity’s most well-known battles was fought that year.…
 
Julius Caesar is considered by many as a key individual whose influence ended the Roman Republic. His life was complex, and in modern times, his legacy lives on in facets like the Month of “July”. Head of the Classics Department, Professor Richard Alston, Royal Holloway, University of London, joins the show again to discuss the early period of Juli…
 
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