show episodes
 
Join physicians at Johns Hopkins Medicine for its women’s health podcast series, A Woman’s Journey: Insights That Matter, on the first Thursday of each month. Host Lillie Shockney, acclaimed humorist cancer survivor, and nurse, discusses Women and Heart Disease; Symptoms You Shouldn’t Ignore; Mindfulness; Sleep; The Microbiome; Advances in Breast Cancer Treatment; Brain Research; A-fib; Kidney Disease in Women of Color; and Memory with Johns Hopkins experts. Learn about medical advances and ...
 
The Doctor is Out (TDIO) is a podcast exploring the journeys and careers of healthcare providers who have engaged in the world beyond the practice of medicine. Join the host, Dr. Sharif Vakili, in discussions with healthcare leaders who have gone from bedside to start companies, run hospital systems, spearhead public policy, enter the arts, run investment groups and pursue other interesting ventures. About the host: Sharif is a venture investor at Polaris Partners and a resident physician at ...
 
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On Becoming a Healer

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On Becoming a Healer

Saul J. Weiner and Stefan Kertesz

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Two physicians, through dialogue and interviews, take a critical look at medical training and the culture of medicine and explore how interpersonal boundary clarity and the capacity to fully engage are essential to effective medical practice, mentoring, medical education, and a nourishing career. This podcast builds on Dr. Weiner’s book, On Becoming a Healer: The Journey from Patient Care to Caring about Your Patients (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2020). Hosted by Saul J. Weiner MD, and S ...
 
The Aubrey Marcus Podcast is an illuminating conversation with mavens of mental health, relationship, health, business and spirituality. Aubrey Marcus is the founder of the human optimization and health empire Onnit, the New York Times bestselling author of Own the Day (covering the best practices for physical health and mental sovereignty) and Aubrey was one of the first public voices in support of psychedelics and psychedelic medicine in the podcast era. This podcast is unlike any other in ...
 
Jessica Houston is an award winning, Johns Hopkins-trained nutritionist, creator of EatClean30 and founder of Vitamin & Me. She is deconstructing the health space and bringing you access and clear guidance straight from the world's leading experts on strategies to increase healthspan, mental and physical wellbeing through a deeper understanding of nutrition, fitness and wellness. On this podcast, we take you behind the scenes with top global health leaders so you can learn what proper nutrit ...
 
The Center for Nursing Inquiry oversees the scholarly work of nurses in the Johns Hopkins Health System. Our goal is to build the capacity for nurses to participate in the three forms of inquiry: research, evidence-based practice (EBP), and quality improvement (QI). At the Center for Nursing Inquiry, we offer a variety of educational resources and expert guidance to help nurses engage in meaningful, high-quality scholarly work. We are dedicated to advancing the science of nursing. Stay conne ...
 
Dr. Mark Vaughan reviews COVID-19 (Coronavirus or SARS-CoV-2) pandemic news updates. Updates are based on daily news and scientific reports and are usually shorter than 5 minutes. Most of the information is gleaned from the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security daily updates among other sources of health and medical news stories. Dr. Vaughan is the Medical Director of the Auburn Medical Group. He also serves on the Board of Directors for Sutter Independent Physicians. Learn about the Aubu ...
 
Dr. F. Michael Gloth, III, MD, FACP, AGSF, CMD is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, a Clinical Professor of Geriatrics at Florida State University College of Medicine, and President and CEO of AMDG Naples 100 Senior Concierge and Consulting, LLC. His extensive publications include his latest book, an International Book Award winner, Fit at Fifty and Beyond. Most importantly, he is happily m ...
 
Indigenae is a community-guided podcast that celebrates Indigenous womxn's health and wellbeing, brought to you by the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health. Join hosts Sarah Stern (Cherokee Nation), Olivia Trujillo (Navajo Nation), Dr. Sophie Neuner (Karuk Tribe), and their guests on a journey through Indigenous womanhood.
 
In the medical world, I'm an internist and primary care doctor at Johns Hopkins. I see patients, do research on decision-making, uncertainty, and patient-doctor communication; I teach with residents; and I write about the complexities of healthcare. In the non-medical world, I write in English and Yiddish, translating as well between both languages. I publish poetry, short stories, and essays/journalism.
 
Informative and entertaining stories from the editors of the journal Medicine featuring article highlights, hot topics, and other things on their minds. The journal, published every other month and now in its 90th year, includes scholarly reviews and clinical descriptions of patients from the experience of leading clinicians from around the world in the areas of internal medicine, dermatology, neurology, pediatrics, and psychiatry. The editors, David Hellmann, John Bartlett, Howard Lederman, ...
 
At the Rodham Institute, we work to alleviate health disparities in Washington, DC through a multipronged approach utilizing our position as a part of an academic medical center—George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. This podcast series examines issues of health disparities from several perspectives, bringing in the voices of doctors, academic researchers, and patients themselves. Produced and voiced by Diana Hla, a senior at Johns Hopkins University, and David ...
 
Johns Hopkins Medicine is pleased to present its health and medicine podcast, a lively discussion of the week’s medical news and how it may affect you. This five to seven-minute free program features Elizabeth Tracey, director of electronic media for Johns Hopkins Medicine, and Rick Lange M.D., professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins and vice chairman of medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.
 
Welcome to the WAG Your Work Podcast! Writing Accountability Groups (WAGs) began when Kimberly Skarupski, PhD, MPH of Johns Hopkins Medicine started gathering faculty to meet once a week in small groups with a clear goal of developing an unbreakable writing habit. The WAGs method makes writing automatic, mechanical and as routine as tying your shoes... there's nothing magical or mysterious about writing. Stay tuned to the WAG Your Work Podcast to learn more about WAGs and overcoming common b ...
 
Do you want to learn how to become a successful and happy MD? Yes? Well then this show is for you. Each week we bring you an inspiring person or message to help you unlock your full potential. You’ll learn the career secrets of some of the most successful doctors in the world, how they got to where they are, how they learn, their attitudes, what they look for in a young physician and much, much more. We try to reveal the success strategies that no one ever teaches you in medical school. You’ ...
 
Hosted by Bill Curtis and quadruple board certified Dr. Steven Taback, Medicine, We’re Still Practicing sits down with doctors from the world’s most preeminent hospitals for insights into their research, practice, and education. The first in this dedicated series is Johns Hopkins Medicine, with the goal of not only to share the magnificent work being done by these hospitals and doctors, but for them to be able to use it as a high-quality educational tool and platform to share insights and re ...
 
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show series
 
HPV causes cancer, and we have an effective vaccine against it. Now the World Health Organization is advocating for a single dose of the vaccine in places where completing the two dose regimen is challenging. Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson applauds the strategy. Nelson: A single HPV dose might be effective for […]…
 
Political corruption remains … one of the most intriguing and challenging issues in social science research and public policy, perhaps because although it occurs in virtually all polities, its causes, patterns, and consequences often seem unique to each circumstance. – Cadres and Corruption by Xiaobo Lu (2000) Corruption is rampant in many authorit…
 
This intricate, yearning work from award-winning poet Alison Calder asks us to think about the way we perceive and the ways in which we seek to know ourselves and others. In Synaptic (University of Regina Press, 2022) each section explores key themes in science, neurology, and perception. The first, Connectomics, riffs on scientific language to wor…
 
Late one night, journalist Sally Hayden received an urgent message on Facebook: “Sally, we need your help.” It was from a group of Eritrean refugees who had been held in a Libyan detention center for months. Now, Tripoli was crumbling in a scrimmage between warring factions, and the refugees remained stuck, defenseless, with only one hope: contacti…
 
The global epidemic of diabetes and prediabetes afflicts more than 1 billion people. And sadly, more than 50% of people with the disease do not achieve their desired glucose control. In Conquer Your Diabetes: Prevention, Control, Remission, Drs. Martin Abrahamson and Sanjiv Chopra, two Harvard Medical School professors and master clinicians, provid…
 
In today’s episode of How To Be Wrong we welcome Adrian Lenardic, who is a professor in the Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences at Rice University and an avid scakteboarder. Adrian has an interesting background, having started as a visual arts major at UW Madison before switching to geophysics. He went on to get his PhD in pla…
 
The ethics of changemaking and peacebuilding may appear straightforward: advance dignity, promote well-being, minimize suffering. Sounds simple, right? Actually acting ethically when it really matters is rarely straightforward. If someone engaged in change-oriented work sets out to "do good," how should we prioritize and evaluate whose good counts?…
 
The Benin Bronzes are among the British Museum’s most prized possessions. Celebrated for their great beauty, they embody the history, myth and artistry of the ancient Kingdom of Benin, once West Africa’s most powerful, and today part of Nigeria. But despite the Bronzes’ renown, little has been written about the brutal imperial violence with which t…
 
Human fertility rates are declining fast and in twenty years or so the global population will go down fast – not just in affluent countries but in the world as a whole. While many may welcome that outcome, Professor John Aitken who has just written The Infertility Trap: Why Life Choices Impact Your Fertility and Why We Must Act Now (Cambridge UP, 2…
 
On a near-daily basis, data is being used to narrate our lives. Categorizing algorithms drawn from amassed personal data to assign narrative destinies to individuals at crucial junctures, simultaneously predicting and shaping the paths of our lives. Data is commonly assumed to bring us closer to objectivity, but the narrative paths these algorithms…
 
Diminished Faculties: A Political Phenomenology of Impairment (Duke UP, 2022) begins by calling into question a fundamental principle of orthodox phenomenology (and, for that matter, a great deal of humanities research): that of a fully self-aware unchanging subject who can provide a coherent account of its own experience, one which is commensurabl…
 
Does the idea of a world in which facts mean nothing cause anxiety? Fear? Maybe even paranoia? Disinformation: The Nature of Facts and Lies in the Post-Truth Era (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022) cannot cure all the ills of a post-truth world, but by demonstrating how the emergence of digital technology into everyday life has knitted together a number…
 
On a near-daily basis, data is being used to narrate our lives. Categorizing algorithms drawn from amassed personal data to assign narrative destinies to individuals at crucial junctures, simultaneously predicting and shaping the paths of our lives. Data is commonly assumed to bring us closer to objectivity, but the narrative paths these algorithms…
 
Does the idea of a world in which facts mean nothing cause anxiety? Fear? Maybe even paranoia? Disinformation: The Nature of Facts and Lies in the Post-Truth Era (Rowman and Littlefield, 2022) cannot cure all the ills of a post-truth world, but by demonstrating how the emergence of digital technology into everyday life has knitted together a number…
 
Are humans the only dreamers on Earth? What goes on in the minds of animals when they sleep? When Animals Dream: The Hidden World of Animal Consciousness (Princeton UP, 2022) brings together behavioral and neuroscientific research on animal sleep with philosophical theories of dreaming. It shows that dreams provide an invaluable window into the cog…
 
On a near-daily basis, data is being used to narrate our lives. Categorizing algorithms drawn from amassed personal data to assign narrative destinies to individuals at crucial junctures, simultaneously predicting and shaping the paths of our lives. Data is commonly assumed to bring us closer to objectivity, but the narrative paths these algorithms…
 
Three members of a loving Minnesota family have a voice in Caitlin Hamilton Summie’s new thought-provoking novel-in-stories, Geographies of the Heart (Fomite 2022). Sarah, the eldest daughter, Al, Sarah’s husband, and Glennie, Sarah’s younger sister take turns telling their story. The book begins with Sarah and Al’s courtship, their relationships w…
 
In this episode Saronik talks to Manasvin Rajagopalan about critical possibilities in varied literary ideations of love. Manasvin mentions Hannah Arendt’s concept of love as destruction, the concepts of Puram and Akam in classical Tamil poetics, Moliere’s comedies, Plato’s Symposium, the Hebrew Bible, Sappho’s poetry, the story of Shakuntala, and T…
 
Ratan Kumar Roy's book Television in Bangladesh: News and Audiences (Routledge, 2020) examines the role of 24/7 television news channels in Bangladesh. By using a multi-sited ethnography of television news media, it showcases the socio-political undercurrents of media practices and the everydayness of TV news in Bangladesh. It discusses a wide gamu…
 
Why has "car society" proven so durable, even in the face of mounting environmental and economic crises? In Globalizing Automobilism: Exuberance and the Emergence of Layered Mobility, 1900–1980 (Berghahn Books, 2020), Gijs Mom traces the global spread of the automobile in the postwar era and investigates why adopting more sustainable forms of mobil…
 
We continue our discussion with Mark Nordenberg, who shares lessons from his successful 19 year tenure as Chancellor of the University of Pittsburgh and his subsequent career as Director of the Institute of Politics, including his recent stint chairing the Committee charged with making recommendations on Pennsylvania redistricting. David Finegold i…
 
HPV causes cancer, and we have an effective vaccine against it. Now the World Health Organization is advocating for a single dose of the vaccine in places where completing the two dose regimen is challenging. Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson applauds the strategy. Nelson: A single HPV dose might be effective for […]…
 
HPV causes cancer, and we have an effective vaccine against it. Now the World Health Organization is advocating for a single dose of the vaccine in places where completing the two dose regimen is challenging. Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson applauds the strategy. Nelson: A single HPV dose might be effective for […]…
 
HPV causes cancer, and we have an effective vaccine against it. Now the World Health Organization is advocating for a single dose of the vaccine in places where completing the two dose regimen is challenging. Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center director William Nelson applauds the strategy. Nelson: A single HPV dose might be effective for […]…
 
Breakthrough infections, which occur in those who have been vaccinated against Covid-19, are more troubling for people with cancer than those without, a new study confirms. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, reviews the data. Nelson: The severity was also concerning. If you looked among the people who got an […]…
 
Breakthrough infections, which occur in those who have been vaccinated against Covid-19, are more troubling for people with cancer than those without, a new study confirms. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, reviews the data. Nelson: The severity was also concerning. If you looked among the people who got an […]…
 
Breakthrough infections, which occur in those who have been vaccinated against Covid-19, are more troubling for people with cancer than those without, a new study confirms. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, reviews the data. Nelson: The severity was also concerning. If you looked among the people who got an […]…
 
Breakthrough infections, which occur in those who have been vaccinated against Covid-19, are more troubling for people with cancer than those without, a new study confirms. William Nelson, director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, reviews the data. Nelson: The severity was also concerning. If you looked among the people who got an […]…
 
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