show episodes
 
G
Gospelbound

1
Gospelbound

The Gospel Coalition, Collin Hansen

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
Gospelbound, hosted by Collin Hansen for The Gospel Coalition, is a podcast for those searching for firm faith in an anxious age. Each week, Collin talks with insightful guests about books, ideas, and how to navigate life by the gospel of Jesus Christ in a post-Christian culture.
 
Read the Bible features devotional commentaries from D.A. Carson’s book For the Love of God (vol. 1) that follow the M’Cheyne Bible reading plan. This podcast is designed to be used alongside TGC's Read The Bible initiative (TGC.org/readthebible).
 
R
Recorded

1
Recorded

The Gospel Coalition

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Psalm 102 reminds us to record what God has done so that future generations will praise him. The Gospel Coalition's story-telling podcast, Recorded, chronicles a variety of stories of God’s redemptive and transformative work. These narratives testify to the beauty of the gospel on display in this generation—in many places and in surprising ways. Whether your faith is strong or struggling, tune in to Recorded for encouraging snapshots of God’s faithfulness, nearness, and love.
 
L
Let's Talk

1
Let's Talk

Jackie Hill Perry, Melissa Kruger, Jasmine Holmes

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Let’s Talk is a podcast for women from The Gospel Coalition Podcast Network. On each episode, Jackie Hill Perry, Melissa Kruger, and Jasmine Holmes talk about a different topic and how to apply biblical wisdom to everyday life.
 
Y
You're Not Crazy

1
You're Not Crazy

Sam Allberry, Ray Ortlund, The Gospel Coalition

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Are you a young pastor who might be tempted to give up, to even hate the ministry, wondering what on earth you signed up for? In this new podcast, pastors Ray Ortlund and Sam Allberry set out to encourage and remind you that you're not crazy.
 
The Spurgeon Fellowship Spokane, in partnership with The Gospel Coalition Inland Northwest, seeks to encourage and equip pastors in the Inland Northwest regional area. For more information visit https://inw.thegospelcoalition.org. If you are experiencing a technical difficulty with this podcast or one of the episodes please contact Jason at jjupchurch@yahoo.com.
 
T
TGC Q&A

1
TGC Q&A

The Gospel Coalition

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
Each week, we’re joined by Council members of The Gospel Coalition Council and friends who provide biblical perspective on your most pressing questions. Whatever your doubts or questions may be, this is a space where we hope to share biblical insight into life’s questions together.
 
T
TGC Canada Podcast

1
TGC Canada Podcast

The Gospel Coalition Canada

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
The Gospel Coalition Canada podcast aims to equip and to encourage Christians to understand the Gospel for all of life. It hosts conversations among church leaders, the ‘Worship God’ Podcast for worship leaders and teams, and lastly Gospel-centred talks and sermons.
 
A
As In Heaven

1
As In Heaven

The Gospel Coalition

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
As In Heaven, hosted by Jim Davis and Michael Aitcheson, is a new podcast in The Gospel Coalition podcast network. Each episode seeks to glean insights from a wide variety of people doing strategic work in their cities and communities. Jesus taught us to pray “Thy kingdom come, Thy will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.” Our prayer is that our spheres of influence would be places that look more like God’s kingdom—where love reigns, humanity flourishes, and Christ is glorified.
 
Loading …
show series
 
The transfer of regal authority from David to Solomon (1 Kings 1) is messy. One of David’s sons, Adonijah, confers with Joab, the head of the military, and tries to take over. Bathsheba, Solomon’s mother, reminds her ailing husband of his promise that Solomon would be the heir, and the complicated account plays out. Once again the chronic family fa…
 
El Tabano and Micah Sample talk about the seemingly forced resignation of Adam Greenway and what credit must go to the Enemies within the Church and Wokepedia team for exposing what was going wrong on the Southwestern Baptist campus. SPONSORS: Pre-order your copy of the upcoming book Cancel-Proof Christianity by Bobby Lopez using code BOBBY for 10%…
 
Galatians 4 includes a couple of sections that have long prompted Christians to ponder exactly how Paul understands the history of Israel—especially the so-called “allegory” of 4:21–31. They attract a great deal of attention. Tucked into the middle of the chapter, however, are two short paragraphs that disclose a great deal of the apostle’s heart (…
 
Galatians 3 could usefully occupy us for an entire book as long as the one on which this devotion is based. But here I shall restrict myself to two observations. First, in the first five verses Paul appeals to experience. He asks the Galatians whether their conversion and all their experience of the grace of God and the power of the Spirit came to …
 
In 2009, around 25 percent of American high school students said they had “persistent feelings of sadness or hopelessness.” By 2021, it was up to 44 percent, the highest level of teenage sadness ever recorded. For girls, the number was even higher: 57 percent. What could account for such a dramatic change between 2009 and today? If you looked at a …
 
Some commentators understand Paul in Galatians 2:1ff. to be saying that after some years he returned to Jerusalem to set before the Jerusalem apostles and other leaders the Gospel he had been preaching among the Gentiles, because he wanted to have himself checked out. He did this privately, of course; yet the fact of the matter is that Paul was afr…
 
The opening lines of Paul’s letters are usually crafted with great care. The simplest form of letters in the ancient Greek world was: “From me, to you, Greetings”—often followed by some statement of thanks, and then the body of the letter. But Paul’s customary practice is to “tweak” every component to anticipate what is coming in the rest of his le…
 
In many churches around the world, though comparatively less frequently in North America, the minister at the end of the service will quietly utter the two words, “The grace.” Those gathered know that this is a signal for the entire congregation to pray together, reciting the verse from which these two words are drawn: “May the grace of the Lord Je…
 
“I must go on boasting,” Paul writes (2 Cor. 12:1), though of course he has been doing so only in the most ironic way (see yesterday’s meditation and the one for September 21). But now he faces a new dilemma. Apparently his opponents have been boasting about their spiritual experiences. They may even have been saying something like, “Well, of cours…
 
In the continuing pressure he felt to respond to those who were undermining his authority in Corinth, Paul finds he must “boast” while not “boasting” (see yesterday’s meditation). In 2 Corinthians 10 Paul climaxes his argument by insisting that the Christian’s only proper boasting is in Christ Jesus: “Let him who boasts boast in the Lord” (2 Cor. 1…
 
There is a great deal of boasting in Western evangelicalism. Some of it is so flagrant that it is repulsive to all serious-minded people. Much of it, however, is subtle and potentially subversive. Probably most of us are guilty of it sometimes. On first reading, it sounds as if Paul in 2 Corinthians 10 is also caught up in boasting, a word that rec…
 
Second Corinthians 9 is the second of two consecutive chapters that Paul devotes to the subject of giving. (1) He resumes with a lovely delicacy (2 Cor. 9:1–5). On the one hand, he assures the Corinthians that they do not really need reminders; on the other, he gently reminds them, so that neither he nor they will be embarrassed. After all, just as…
 
You are not in control. You never have been. You never will be. That fact of life is tough for many of us to swallow. “The cultural air I breathe has trained me to think that life should be more carefree, predictable, and in control than it is,” Scott Sauls writes in his new book, Beautiful People Don’t Just Happen: How God Redeems Regret, Hurt, an…
 
The longest sustained encouragement in the New Testament to give money is found in 2 Corinthians 8–9. Today I shall reflect on some of the emphases in 2 Corinthians 8. (1) Paul encourages the Corinthians to give by referring to the generosity of the Macedonians, who lived in the province to the north and were often viewed by those in Achaia, includ…
 
What a twisted thing sin is. Its motives and machinations are convoluted and perverse. At one level the account of 2 Samuel 14 is pretty straightforward. At another, it is full of thought-provoking ironies. David adopts the worst of all possible courses. At first he cannot simply forgive Absalom, for that would in effect be admitting that he, David…
 
The threat to David’s reign predicted by the prophet Nathan begins with a sordid side-tale that nevertheless betrays exactly what is wrong with David’s rule (2 Sam. 13). The multiplicity of royal wives meant that there were many half brothers and half sisters. This sets up the wretched rape of Tamar. The profiles of the people involved, with the ex…
 
In Nathan’s dramatic confrontation with King David (2 Sam. 12), the prophet’s courage was mingled with a formidable sagacity. How else could a prophet grab the attention of an autocratic king and denounce his sin to his face, apart from this oblique approach? Certain features of this chapter must be reflected on. First, the fundamental difference b…
 
In this episode of The Big Brown Gadfly, El Tabano interviews Judith Stacey, an accomplished feminist who wrote key texts in the 1990s. Although El Tabano and she disagree on some things, we have to credit Dr Stacey for correctly predicting that conservatives would abandon “Family Values” once they felt pressure to invest real resources behind the …
 
Here is David at his worst (2 Sam. 11). In the flow of the narrative through 1 and 2 Samuel, it is almost as if adversity brought out the best in David, while his chain of recent unbroken military and political successes finds him restless, foolish, and not careful. The sins are multiple. Besides the obvious transgressions of lust, adultery, and mu…
 
When it comes to selecting a book of the Bible to study or teach, Revelation is a book that is often avoided. We’re a bit intimidated by it—afraid we won’t be able to understand it, afraid of the controversy that surrounds it, and afraid of the realities it presents in its graphic strangeness. We also know it is a book some people have an unhealthy…
 
In some ways, Paul finds himself in an embarrassing position. If he fails to answer some of the concerns that the Corinthians entertained about him and his ministry, he could lose them—not lose them personally (that wouldn’t have bothered Paul), but lose their loyalty to him and therefore to the message that he preached. On the other hand, if he go…
 
It is beyond these brief reflections to provide a history of the difficult visits and painful letters that generated deep emotion in the apostle’s relations with the Corinthians. Relations between Corinth and Paul are apparently improving in the opening chapters of 2 Corinthians, but remain a trifle raw. In this context Paul devotes quite a bit of …
 
“We are all like Job,” write Bill Kynes and Will Kynes in their new book, Wrestling with Job: Defiant Faith in the Face of Suffering (IVP Academic). We are “engaged in a mysterious cosmic battle, as every day our faith is put to the test, and God himself is honored when we trust, obey, and worship him as the great and glorious God that he is.” In t…
 
After his palace is built, David recognizes that he is living in splendor in comparison with the small and unostentatious tabernacle. He desires to build a temple, a “house” in which to place the ark of the covenant (2 Sam. 7). Through Nathan the prophet, however, God puts the shoe on the other foot. David wants to build a “house” for God, but God …
 
David would doubtless make many of us uncomfortable if he lived today. He was such an intense man—exuberant in his pleasures, crushed in his discouragement, powerful in his leadership, unrestrained in his worship. (1) One occasion that displays much of the man displays no less of God, viz. bringing the ark of the covenant, and presumably the entire…
 
Clearly the writer of 2 Samuel (whose identity we do not know) thinks it important to record the various steps by which David came to rule over all Israel. Canonically, this is important because it is the beginning of the Davidic dynasty that leads directly to “great David’s greater Son” (see the May 17 meditation). Within this framework, I wish to…
 
Even after the death of King Saul, David did not immediately become king of Israel. At first David is anointed king over Judah (2 Sam. 2:1–7), and only Judah: even Benjamin, which remained with Judah following the division between “Israel” and “Judah” after the death of Solomon, at this point was allied with the other tribes (2 Sam. 2:9). Abner, th…
 
Although 1 Corinthians 13 forms part of a sustained argument that runs through chapters 12–14, the passage constitutes such a lovely unit with so many wonderfully evocative lines that it has called forth countless extended treatments. Today I shall reflect a little on the first three verses. This text does not say that love is everything and that t…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login