show episodes
 
N
Nature Podcast

1
Nature Podcast

Springer Nature Limited

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Weekly+
 
The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of the Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors. Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.
 
D
Don't Panic Geocast

51
Don't Panic Geocast

John Leeman and Shannon Dulin

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly+
 
John Leeman and Shannon Dulin discuss geoscience and technology weekly for your enjoyment! Features include guests, fun paper Friday selections, product reviews, and banter about recent developments. Shannon is a field geologist who tolerates technology and John is a self-proclaimed nerd that tolerates geologists.
 
Third Pod from the Sun is back, and we’re going weekly! We’re breaking things up into six-week mini-series and our first series is all about the true, personal stories from scientists, for everyone. Join us as we combat misconceptions about sharks, learn how to lasso lizards, hear from a Martian here on Earth, spark science joy via TikTok, journey to Antarctica, and fight over food with some capuchins!
 
Welcome to Science Sessions, the PNAS podcast program. Listen to brief conversations with cutting-edge researchers, Academy members, and policymakers as they discuss topics relevant to today's scientific community. Learn the behind-the-scenes story of work published in PNAS, plus a broad range of scientific news about discoveries that affect the world around us.
 
The Nature Medicine Podcast reports on cutting-edge news in biomedical research from around the globe. The program features interviews with experts and a review of the advances that scientists hope to translate from bench to bedside. Tune into the podcast to learn about breakthroughs and policy developments in medical research.
 
Hosted by Pinoy science journalist Mikael Angelo Francisco, the Ask Theory Podcast shines the spotlight on Pinoy scientific brilliance. Each episode of Ask Theory features a Pinoy scientist from one of the various scientific disciplines. In a very casual Taglish conversation, guests explain what they do in simple terms, as well as share their fascinating stories: how they got into science, the challenges they face, what motivates them to pursue their fields, what future scientists from the P ...
 
B
Breaking Ground

1
Breaking Ground

Ground Engineering Magazine & The Ground Forum

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Breaking Ground is the voice of the geotechnical industry, and is supported by Ground Engineering Magazine and The Ground Forum. Hosted by Steve Hadley, Chair of the Federation of Piling Specialists, the podcast covers a wide range of topics including sustainability, design, commerce and STEM. If you're in the industry - or if you're thinking of joining - there will be something here for you! To find out more about Ground Engineering Magazine, visit http://www.geplus.co.uk. To find out more ...
 
This podcast series was put together by data science intern Leo Elworth to spread knowledge on these hot topics to the broader community. As the buzz around data science and machine learning continues to grow, more and more people are developing a curiosity for these topics, as well as their applications to the specific field of oil and gas. Interviews with expert data scientists and geologists serve to highlight innovative problems and share entertaining anecdotes. Podcast editing assistanc ...
 
Dr Judy L Mohr is a real doctor, but not a medical doctor. Nope… The Doc has a PhD in Astronomy on top of her Master in Engineering. She’s not ashamed to admit that she has spent far too long at school. But her love of science extends beyond the stars and machines. Ever wanted to know how the things worked but was confused by all the scientific terms. Come and take a seat as Dr Judy L Mohr explains the world around us in a way we can all understand. Welcome to Conversations in Science
 
Loading …
show series
 
Brian Huber is a climate detective at the Smithsonian who grew up collecting arrowheads in the woods of Ohio, but now collects and studies fossils from sediment cores. Brian uses fossils of tiny organisms − foraminifera − to track climate over millions of years, including the Cretaceous Hot Greenhouse climate. We talked to Brian about a time when t…
 
00:47 Evidence of a proton’s charm For decades, scientists have debated whether protons have ‘intrinsic charm’, meaning they contain elementary particles known as charm quarks. Now, using machine learning to comb through huge amounts of experimental data, a team have shown evidence that the charm quark can be found within a proton, which may have i…
 
In this first episode of Nature's Take, we get four of Nature's staff around microphones to get their expert take on preprints. These pre-peer-review open access articles have spiked in number over recent years and have cemented themselves as an integral part of scientific publishing. But this has not been without its issues. In this discussion we …
 
Franklin Cercado is a licensed geologist and scuba diver. He works for the Iloilo Provincial Government in the Environment and Natural Resources Office, and is taking a masters' degree in Biology in U.P. Visayas. We talked about striking a balance between economic needs and environmental preservation, interdisciplinary and interregional cooperation…
 
John's company ran the second iteration of the GEARS workshop (read about 2021 here). After learning some hard lessons last year, this year's workshop was much different and hopefully even better! Fun Paper Friday Thanks to listener Darryl for this fun... poster Friday? We'll wrap up the episode talking about wraps! Tastee Tape Poster Contact us: S…
 
Anant Pande is an Indian polar researcher who studies snow petrels - shy pelagic (sea-faring) birds who nest on rock crevices in Antarctica. These endemic birds prefer to nest near less icy waters. Climate change has melted polar oceans and perhaps made it less energy intensive -- as they have to fly shorter distances to find non-frozen oceans. But…
 
Lydia Violet Hartoonian Lydia Violet Hartoonian returns to Fairbanks. That’s a first for this musician and activist who often tours, but hasn’t before returned to deepen the link between her and visited communities. She draws inspiration from the teachings of ecologist and Buddhist scholar Joanna Macy. She will lead a pair of engagements on Friday …
 
Cold exposure in mice activates brown fat to deny tumours glucose, and the future of extreme heatwaves. 00:45 How cold temperatures could starve tumours A team of researchers have found that exposing mice to the cold could starve tumour cells of the blood glucose they need to thrive. They showed that the cold temperatures deprived the tumours of fu…
 
Dr. Buddy Omar is a clinical fellow in neuro-oncology at the University of Toronto, and is taking his Masters of Science in Epidemiology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. After his time in the PGH Neurosurgery Residency program, he pursued further training in endoscopic skull base surgery at the University of Calgary. We talked abou…
 
Glaciers around the world are melting because of climate change. Yet, while glaciers might be smaller than they once were, that’s not stopping tourists from flocking to see them. We talked with Heather Purdie, a glaciologist and former glacier guide, about how exactly glaciers are changing and how glacier tourism is adapting to these changes. This …
 
00:47 The economic benefits of social connections By looking at data gathered from billions of Facebook friendships, researchers have shown that having more connections with people from higher income groups could increase future incomes by 20%. They also show how such connections can be formed, and how schools and other institutions could help to i…
 
Dr. Rodney Perez a senior researcher at the National Institute for Molecular Biology and Biotechnology at the University of the Philippines Los Baños. His research work is focused on the elucidation of the biosynthetic mechanism, mode of action, and the application of antimicrobial peptides (bacteriocins) from lactic acid bacteria. In 2021, he beca…
 
Inequity has been a central feature of the COVID19 pandemic. From health outcomes to access to vaccines, COVID has pushed long-standing disparities out of the shadows and into the public eye and many of these problems are global. In this episode of Coronapod we dig into a radical new collaboration of 15 countries - co-led by the WHO, and modelled o…
 
Dive down into the freezing depths of Patricia Lake, in Alberta’s Jasper National Park, and you will find the wreck of the Habbakuk—a sixty-foot model battleship originally constructed of wood and ice. This “berg ship” was the brainchild of the eccentric wartime genius Geoffrey Pyke. In 1943, the Allies were being hard pressed by German U-boats, an…
 
00:45 Working out how the ability to digest milk spread Humans have been drinking milk for thousands of years, but it seems that they were doing so long before the ability to digest it became prevalent. Then around 2000 years ago, this ability became common in Europe, presenting a mystery to researchers – why then? Now by analyzing health data, anc…
 
Diovanie de Jesus is a Campaign and Science Specialist at Oceana Philippines. He worked as a research associate at the Marine Science Institute of the University of the Philippines. His previous research work experience enabled him to conduct studies about coral reef ecosystems, help with the management of the Philippines’ Marine Protected Areas, a…
 
Lightning produces many phenomena, but one is pops, clicks, and whistles in the radio frequencies. Learn why, how, and what the upper atmosphere has to do with it! Listen to a Whistler Listen to Sferics Radio Jove Fun Paper Friday Should there be speed bumps that say "rate your pain" at the entrance to the emergency room? These authors say it could…
 
Cool off from the summer heat with our next six-part miniseries all about ice – from those who call it home to its use as a tool in science. Experts tell us how this state of matter can create shelters and ships, document changes in climate, bring communities together, and even support future astronaut missions on the Moon. This episode was produce…
 
00:46 When did mammals start to regulate their temperature? The evolution of ‘warm bloodedness’ allowed mammals to live in a more diverse range of habitats, but working out when this occurred has been difficult. To try and pin down a date, researchers have studied the fossilised remains of ancient mammals' inner ears, which suggest that this key ev…
 
Jovannemar Anire is a Masters student at Wageningen University who specializes in plant breeding and genetic resources. He worked as a faculty researcher at Visayas State University, where he headed the Varietal Improvement Section of the National Coconut Research Center - Visayas. We talked about some of the basics of plant breeding, some little-k…
 
This week we talk about sounds from the Aurora and strange atmospheric conditions that create it. Sound producing mechanism in the temperature inversion layer and its sensitivity to geomagnetic activity Fun Paper Friday What can we do to fight a fierce predator? The cat! Cecchetti, Martina, et al. "Provision of high meat content food and object pla…
 
The International Space Station feels like a permanent fixture. It’s been up there since 2000! But earlier this year, NASA announced it is bringing the ISS back to earth in the 2030s as it plans for new space stations. We talked with Justin Walsh about what he’s learned about human life in space by doing archaeology research on the ISS and what he’…
 
00:46 A long-term record of climate in the tropics To understand the history of the Earth’s climate, researchers often rely on things like ice cores, which contain layered frozen insights of thousands of years of history. However, in the tropics long-term records like these have been absent. Now researchers have uncovered a sediment core in Peru wh…
 
In this Podcast Extra, Nature's Lizzie Gibney and Federico Levi take a deep-dive into the Higgs boson, describing their experiences of its discovery, what the latest run of the Large Hadron Collider might reveal about the particle's properties, and what role it could play in potential physics beyond the standard model. Nature News: Happy birthday, …
 
Paul Caesar Flores is a PhD student at Yokohama National University and a Research Student at the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology. He is particularly interested in the fields of marine geophysics, seismology, and earthquakes, and was involved in multiple projects such as mapping mesophotic coral ecosystems, offshore active faul…
 
Since early in the pandemic, scientists have searched for signals of SARS-CoV-2 transmission by sampling wastewater. This surveillance method has provided vital information to inform public health responses. But the approach has never been particularly specific - pointing to broad trends rather than granular information such as which variants are s…
 
Hans Sues is a fossil guy at the Smithsonian. Born in Germany, he has been all over the world finding and interpreting fossils for more than 40 years. His focus is on vertebrates – both in his professional work and his personal attachment to cats. We talked with Hans about why the Triassic era had so many strange animals, what happened in the extin…
 
00:46 Happy birthday, Higgs boson - looking back at a momentous milestone for physics Ten years ago this week, scientists announced that they’d found evidence of the existence of the Higgs boson, a fundamental particle first theorised to exist nearly sixty years earlier. To celebrate this anniversary, we reminisce about what the discovery meant at …
 
Steve Hadley meets Yuli (Chaido) Doulala-Rigby, Chief Engineer at Tensar. They talk about Yuli’s journey into geosynthetics, product types and applications. Yuli promotes geogrids as playing a key role in sustainable temporary and permanent works geotechnical solutions. She also goes on to bust some myths about women in engineering and offers an in…
 
Dr. Joshua P. Torres is a conotoxinologist at the Department of Biomedical Sciences of the University of Copenhagen. As a medicinal chemist, he studies the medicinal potential of marine animals and bacteria, mostly from the Philippines. We talked about cone snails and how they manage to be both dangerous and beneficial to humans, the discovery of t…
 
Listen to singing ice! Fun Paper Friday Science makes you feel stupid and that's okay! Schwartz, Martin A. "The importance of stupidity in scientific research." Journal of Cell Science 121.11 (2008): 1771-1771. Contact us: Show Support us on Patreon! www.dontpanicgeocast.com SWUNG Slack @dontpanicgeo show@dontpanicgeocast.com John Leeman www.johnrl…
 
In the first episode of our new series Nature hits the books, science journalist Ed Yong joins us to talk about his new book An Immense World, which takes a journey through the weird and wonderful realm of animal senses. In the show, we chat about how our human-centric view of the world has restricted researchers' understanding of animal senses, ho…
 
Dani DellaGiustina is one of the youngest leaders of a NASA mission, and she was in charge of image processing for OSIRIS-REx before she even got her PhD. OSIRIS-REx is a spacecraft sent to study asteroid Bennu and scheduled to return a sample to Earth in 2023. Dani walks us through the difference between asteroids and comets—it turns out there’s s…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login