show episodes
 
Join nerd power couple Alex and Elayne as we take a spoiler-free chapter-by-chapter dive into the classic sci-fi Dune series by Frank Herbert. Elayne is a prolific sci-fi/fantasy reader who has somehow let this classic series pass her by, while Alex is on his second read and will be our resident “expert”. In each episode, released on Mondays, we'll recap and discuss up to three chapters, and talk about plot points, characters, and the Dune universe at large, all in a manner that's spoiler-fr ...
 
It’s been three months since former enforcer Amaranthe Lokdon and the notorious assassin Sicarius thwarted kidnappers and saved the emperor’s life. The problem? Nobody knows they were responsible for this good deed. Worse, they’re being blamed for the entire scheme. With enforcers and bounty hunters stalking them, and the emperor nursing a personal hatred for Sicarius, it’s going to be hard to earn exoneration. When Amaranthe’s team discovers mutilated bodies in the city aqueducts and a myst ...
 
Imperial law enforcer Amaranthe Lokdon is good at her job: she can deter thieves and pacify thugs, if not with a blade, then by toppling an eight-foot pile of coffee canisters onto their heads. But when ravaged bodies show up on the waterfront, an arson covers up human sacrifices, and a powerful business coalition plots to kill the emperor, she feels a tad overwhelmed. Worse, Sicarius, the empire's most notorious assassin, is in town. He's tied in with the chaos somehow, but Amaranthe would ...
 
The World In-Between is a Dungeons and Dragons-inspired campaign podcast that follows the story of three groups of adventurers across a continent plagued by war and imperialism. Join the Elysian Empire group on their journey across the land in service to the coldblooded Emperor Titus Cicero Amulius, the Fae group as they make their way through ancient Fae lands searching for allies and reuniting kingdoms, and the Lolos Republic group gathering secret intel to protect their country from the E ...
 
Will Covid-19 reshape the global economy or simply shrink it? What are nations doing to protect jobs and businesses from the fallout, and what will the long-term consequences be for labor markets, global supply chains and government finances? On Stephanomics, a podcast hosted by Bloomberg Economics head Stephanie Flanders—the former BBC economics editor and chief market strategist for Europe at JPMorgan Asset Management—we combine reports from Bloomberg journalists around the world and conve ...
 
Volume V of a series containing anecdotes and stories, some well-known, others less so, of particular countries. This fifth volume covers the history of Germany from its first contact with Rome up to the coronation of Emperor William, describing history for children and young adults in an exciting and novel manner. (Introduction by Kalynda)
 
Why aren’t droids allowed in Mos Eisley Cantina? How does hyperspace travel work? What’s so special about Endor? The Star Wars Loose Canon podcast answers these questions and many more. We’re just three dudes with a breadth of Star Wars knowledge and severe penchants for snark. Our job is to bring you this information (without dying first), making it both accessible for new fans and rich enough for fanboys to engage. Come for the bad puns, stay for the petulant Emperor impressions.
 
Join pro wrestling historians Big D and Brandon Draven for a wacky and fun journey through the history of professional wrestling with the Kayfabulous Lucha Bros Wrestling Podcast - brought to you SuperfriendsUniverse.com. On most weeks you'll hear D and Draven pick a random show from the past, give you the most in depth and analytical discussion of ANY show on the interwebs, AND bring the barrel of laughs along the way. Its like no other show you've ever heard - I promise. Subscribe to the s ...
 
Geek Grills, A podcast in which geeky women, and sometimes guests, gather to record topical conversation and then offer it to the masses. Topics may include video games, science, technology, politics, religion, animals, whatever we damn well please, etc...
 
Pandemics, violent eruptions, city sackings, egomaniac emperors. Sound familiar? History always repeats itself. Archaeologist host Darius Arya Digs goes back 2000 years to uncover elements of Ancient Rome & its expansive Empire. On location from the back streets of Rome to the bazaar of Cairo, from the Agora of Athens to the Medina of Tunis, and from the Vatican Museums to the Roman emperor Diocletian’s palace of Split. Episodes drop each Monday!
 
Author Dana Schwartz explores the stories of some of history’s most fascinating royals: the tyrants and the tragic, the murderers and the murdered, and everyone in between. Because when you’re wearing a crown, mistakes often mean blood. New episodes every two weeks, on Tuesdays.
 
A weekly News Podcast that covers the biggest stories of the week with a Star Wars spin! We'll cover everything from LGBTQ+ rights, Black Lives Matter, and immigration alongside the politics and policies impacting those issues. Star Wars is political, and we'll show you how every week.
 
The War on Cars is a podcast about car culture, mobility and the future of cities. We bring you news, commentary and stories about the worldwide battle to undo a century's worth of damage wrought by the automobile. The War on Cars is waged by three leading voices of the livable streets movement, Doug Gordon, Sarah Goodyear and Aaron Naparstek. Liberate your city. Enlist today in The War on Cars.
 
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show series
 
Fujiwara Yoshifusa sets a new precedent when he angles to have an eight-year old son of the late Emperor Montoku set upon the throne as Emperor Seiwa. Yoshifusa rulled as Sesshō, a regent governing on behalf of a child, and was the first person to obtain this title who was not a member of the royal family. For a portrait of Emperor Seiwa as well as…
 
In this episode, we take a look at the new trailer for the now-2021 Denis Villeneuve adaptation of Dune (finally coming out in just a few short months!), discussing scenes and aesthetics from the trailer, hypothesizing about the overall tone of the film based on what we're shown here, debating choices we think the adaptation might be making, and ge…
 
In her magnificent and lyrical new book, The Emperor Who Never Was: Dara Shukoh in Mughal India (Harvard UP, 2020), Supriya Gandhi reorients and adds unprecedented depth to our understanding of the much memorialized but less understood Mughal prince and thinker Dara Shukoh (d. 1659), and of his broader political and social milieu. Written with exce…
 
Great conversation with my NZ pal Warren Matthews on a new way to enhance energy levels and slow aging - it's getting more and more press in recent years. It involves NAD+, the crucial component in our physiology that declines hugely with age, along with increasing DNA damage. Here we go through the basics and find out what Warren is doing about it…
 
In this KidLit Radio podcast, Mac Barnett reads Paola, Emperor of Rome! Buon giorno! Longing, freedom, adventure, pizza — have we got a story for you! While taking a trip abroad may not be possible because of Covid this summer, on this episode of Read Out Loud, author Mac Barnett takes us on a whirlwind tour of the Eternal City in PAOLO: EMPEROR OF…
 
"Speed kills" as my father likes to say. Too much, too fast and the frog becomes aware he's being boiled alive and transforms into a much more dangerous and serious kind of water animal - like an alligator. It turns out, people generally don't like being ordered what to do with their own bodies, children and very lives by morally bankrupt demagogue…
 
In this throwback episode Sebastian revisits a series from Season One of OFH. After the shows on Jared Diamond it seemed like a good time to take another look at the conquest of Mexico. This was also the first time "Ancient Aliens" came up on the show. Tune-in and find out how regrets about pacing, scallywags, and Christopher Walken all play a role…
 
Enterprise, Alabama is home to a fascinating statue honoring the boll weevil, a tiny creature that once wreaked havoc across cotton country. So what inspired the good people of Enterprise to erect a statue honoring the insect that almost destroyed their town? Learn more in today's episode. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodca…
 
Outlove: A Queer Christian Survival Story, written by Julie Rodgers was published in 2021 by Broadleaf Books Publishing Inc. In this honest and vulnerable book, Rodgers takes us through her journey from ex-gay theology to radical inclusion and self-acceptance as a queer Christian. After decades of bouncing between hope and despair, Evangelical, Bap…
 
Fifth in the Henrietta and Inspector Howard Mystery Series, A Child Lost (She Writes Press, 2020) begins in 1935, with Henrietta’s younger sister, Elsie, falling in love with Gunther, a German refugee. He has come to America to locate Liesel, the mother of a little girl he’s been caring for, and has been working in maintenance at Elsie’s school. El…
 
Adaptive reuse, or using a building for a new purpose, has become popular around the world, but discussion about adaptive reuse in Asia is relatively scarce. As a result, this architectural innovation in Asia, which includes redesigned institutional buildings, awards for cultural heritage conservation projects, and adapted reuse field studies, is o…
 
How are peoples' ideas about languages, ways of speaking and expressive styles shaped by their social positions and values? How is difference, in language and in social life, made - and unmade? How and why are some differences persuasive as the basis for action, while other differences are ignored or erased? Written by two recognised authorities on…
 
Investigating Intelligence is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and neuroscientist John Duncan, University of Cambridge, and examines fascinating questions in neuroscience such as: What is intelligence and what does IQ testing tell us? Can intelligence be measured and improved? What role does our frontal lobe play in ex…
 
Outlove: A Queer Christian Survival Story, written by Julie Rodgers was published in 2021 by Broadleaf Books Publishing Inc. In this honest and vulnerable book, Rodgers takes us through her journey from ex-gay theology to radical inclusion and self-acceptance as a queer Christian. After decades of bouncing between hope and despair, Evangelical, Bap…
 
In Dancing with the Revolution: Power, Politics, and Privilege in Cuba (UNC Press, 2021), Elizabeth B. Schwall aligns culture and politics by focusing on an art form that became a darling of the Cuban revolution: dance. In this history of staged performance in ballet, modern dance, and folkloric dance, Schwall analyzes how and why dance artists int…
 
Today we are joined by Greg Larson, author of Clubbie: A Minor League Baseball Memoir (University of Nebraska, 2021). In Clubbie, Larson shares his unique perspective from his two-year stint as clubhouse attendant for the Aberdeen IronBirds, a Class A short-season affiliate of the Baltimore Orioles. Larson’s starry-eyed perceptions about the game w…
 
Today we are joined by Greg Larson, author of Clubbie: A Minor League Baseball Memoir (University of Nebraska, 2021). In Clubbie, Larson shares his unique perspective from his two-year stint as clubhouse attendant for the Aberdeen IronBirds, a Class A short-season affiliate of the Baltimore Orioles. Larson’s starry-eyed perceptions about the game w…
 
Ideas about how to study and understand cultural history—particularly literature—are rapidly changing as new digital archives and tools for searching them become available. This is not the first information age, however, to challenge ideas about how and why we value literature and the role numbers might play in this process. The Values in Numbers: …
 
An edgy and ambitious debut by a powerful new voice in contemporary literary fiction Monday, Kierk wakes up. Once a rising star in neuroscience, Kierk Suren is now homeless, broken by his all-consuming quest to find a scientific theory of consciousness. But when he's offered a spot in a prestigious postdoctoral program, he decides to rejoin society an…
 
Spies deep behind enemy lines; double agents; a Chinese American James Bond; black propaganda radio broadcasters; guerrilla fighters; pirates; smugglers; prostitutes and dancers as spies; and Asian Americans collaborating with Axis Powers. All these colorful individuals form the story of Asian Americans in the Office of Strategic Services (OSS), th…
 
Welcome to Cover Story, a podcast by New Books Network devoted to long form journalism. Today, we are talking to Texas-based writer Sarah Hepola. Hepola is most known from her brave writing about drinking and the 2015 bestselling memoir Blackout: Remembering the Things I Drank to Forget. She's appeared on NPR’s Fresh Air and published in The New Yo…
 
Women's emancipation through productive labour was a key tenet of socialist politics in post-World War II Yugoslavia. Mass industrialisation under Tito led many young women to join traditionally 'feminised' sectors, and as a consequence the textile sector grew rapidly, fast becoming a gendered symbol of industrialisation, consumption and socialist …
 
In Rotary International and the Selling of American Capitalism (Harvard University Press, 2021), Professor Brendan Goff traces the history of Rotary International from its origins in Chicago in 1905 to its rapid growth during the first four decades of the twentieth century. In doing so, Goff places U.S. power at the center of his analysis. He argue…
 
Vincenzo Gonzaga's first marriage ended in a humiliating divorce by non-consummation. His next set of would-be in-laws wanted to make sure the same problem wouldn't happen twice, and so the Vatican was called in to help orchestrate a public trial for Gonzaga to undertake. Turns out there was nothing simple about sex and masculinity in Renaissance I…
 
Do newborns think-do they know that 'three' is greater than 'two'? Do they prefer 'right' to 'wrong'? What about emotions--do newborns recognize happiness or anger? If they do, then how are our inborn thoughts and feelings encoded in our bodies? Could they persist after we die? Going all the way back to ancient Greece, human nature and the mind-bod…
 
Is there an ideal portfolio of investment assets, one that perfectly balances risk and reward? In Pursuit of the Perfect Portfolio (Princeton UP, 2021) examines this question by profiling and interviewing ten of the most prominent figures in the finance world—Jack Bogle, Charley Ellis, Gene Fama, Marty Leibowitz, Harry Markowitz, Bob Merton, Myron …
 
On this episode of the Economic and Business History channel I spoke with Dr. Chinmay Tumbe, Assistant Professor of Economics at the Indian Institute of Management. He was Alfred D Chandler Jr. International Visiting Scholar in Business History, Harvard Business School in 2018. Dr, Tumbe has published academic articles in Management and Organizatio…
 
Do newborns think-do they know that 'three' is greater than 'two'? Do they prefer 'right' to 'wrong'? What about emotions--do newborns recognize happiness or anger? If they do, then how are our inborn thoughts and feelings encoded in our bodies? Could they persist after we die? Going all the way back to ancient Greece, human nature and the mind-bod…
 
Since 2004 the Malay-Muslim majority provinces in the border region of southern Thailand have been wracked by a violent insurgency. Over 7000 people have been killed and many thousands more injured. Currently 60,000 Thai security personnel are stationed in the region to conduct counter-insurgency operations. Another 80,000 people have been organize…
 
Set in the eastern state of Odisha in a district known as the “Somalia of India,” Everyday State and Politics in India: Government in the Backyard in Kalahandi (Routledge 2018) studies a development project in a region iconic for development failure. Drawing on rich fieldwork with a watershed development project in district Kalahandi, anthropologis…
 
When someone you love appears to be struggling with an eating disorder, it is hard to know what to say or do. Families and friends need information and guidelines if they are to be helpful. In their recently-published fourth edition of Surviving an Eating Disorder (Fourth Edition; Harper Perennial, 2021), Michele Siegel, Judith Brisman, and Margot …
 
Believing Your Ears: Examining Auditory Illusions is based on an extensive filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Diana Deutsch, Professor of Psychology at UC San Diego and one of the world’s leading experts on the psychology of music. This conversation provides behind the scenes insights into her discovery of a large number of auditory illu…
 
Set in the eastern state of Odisha in a district known as the “Somalia of India,” Everyday State and Politics in India: Government in the Backyard in Kalahandi (Routledge 2018) studies a development project in a region iconic for development failure. Drawing on rich fieldwork with a watershed development project in district Kalahandi, anthropologis…
 
Is there an ideal portfolio of investment assets, one that perfectly balances risk and reward? In Pursuit of the Perfect Portfolio (Princeton UP, 2021) examines this question by profiling and interviewing ten of the most prominent figures in the finance world—Jack Bogle, Charley Ellis, Gene Fama, Marty Leibowitz, Harry Markowitz, Bob Merton, Myron …
 
On this episode of the Economic and Business History channel I spoke with Dr. Chinmay Tumbe, Assistant Professor of Economics at the Indian Institute of Management. He was Alfred D Chandler Jr. International Visiting Scholar in Business History, Harvard Business School in 2018. Dr, Tumbe has published academic articles in Management and Organizatio…
 
Dubbed the "Billy Sunday of China" for the staggering number of people he led to Christ, John Song has captured the imagination of generations of readers. His story, as it became popular in the West, possessed memorable, if not necessarily true, elements: Song was converted while he studied in New York at Union Theological Seminary in 1927, but his…
 
Weaving together personal story and broad analysis, Bagila Burkhabayeva’s The Vanishing Generation: Revolution, Religion, and Disappearance in Modern Uzbekistan (Indiana UP, 2019) deals with the question of Islam and its repression during the period of Islam Karimov’s rule in newly independent Uzbekistan. As witness to the infamous Zhaslyk prison a…
 
Weaving together personal story and broad analysis, Bagila Burkhabayeva’s The Vanishing Generation: Revolution, Religion, and Disappearance in Modern Uzbekistan (Indiana UP, 2019) deals with the question of Islam and its repression during the period of Islam Karimov’s rule in newly independent Uzbekistan. As witness to the infamous Zhaslyk prison a…
 
Dubbed the "Billy Sunday of China" for the staggering number of people he led to Christ, John Song has captured the imagination of generations of readers. His story, as it became popular in the West, possessed memorable, if not necessarily true, elements: Song was converted while he studied in New York at Union Theological Seminary in 1927, but his…
 
Since 2004 the Malay-Muslim majority provinces in the border region of southern Thailand have been wracked by a violent insurgency. Over 7000 people have been killed and many thousands more injured. Currently 60,000 Thai security personnel are stationed in the region to conduct counter-insurgency operations. Another 80,000 people have been organize…
 
La Paz's Colonial Specters: Urbanization, Migration, and Indigenous Political Participation, 1900-52 (Bloomsbury, 2021) explores the urban history of one of Latin America’s most indigenous large cities in the first half of the twentieth century. Tracing the expansion of the “extramuro,” indigenous neighborhoods beyond the center of the city in thes…
 
We often talk as if individuals have entitlements to certain kinds of information: medical test results, political representatives’ voting records, crime statistics, and the like. We also talk as if these entitlements entail duties on the part of others to provide the relevant information. Moreover, we talk as if the individual’s entitlement to inf…
 
Click the player above or YouTube video below to listen, or download the story to your own device for easy playback at any time. What happens when an old man discovers a love for singing after a magical flying boat takes him on a journey of self-discovery? See what musical surprises await in the latest YourClassical Storytime episode, Old Nasuk and…
 
Ping and Pang are very different creatures. The way they look and act couldn’t be further apart. Is it possible, though, that they might have way more in common than they think? Find out on this podcast episode of Read Out Loud as author/illustrator Mary Jane Begin shares her new picture book, PING MEETS PANG, a story of otherness, differences, and…
 
Throughout her career, spanning more than two decades, Jessica Hopper, a revered and pioneering music critic, has examined women recording and producing music, in all genres, through an intersectional feminist lens. The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic (MCD x Fsg Originals, 2021) features oral histories of bands like Hol…
 
Talia Lakshmi Kolluri speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about her story “The Good Donkey,” which appears in The Common’s spring issue. In this conversation, Kolluri talks about writing fiction from the perspectives of different animals, and where the inspiration for those stories comes from. She also discusses how being mixed race can complic…
 
Political parties are taken for granted today, but how was the idea of party viewed in the eighteenth century, when core components of modern, representative politics were trialled? From Bolingbroke to Burke, political thinkers regarded party as a fundamental concept of politics, especially in the parliamentary system of Great Britain. The paradox …
 
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