show episodes
 
The Dybbukast is a podcast from theatre dybbuk that examines and contextualizes poems, plays, and other creative texts from Jewish communities throughout history. Using performed readings and interviews with artists and scholars, The Dybbukast explores these texts and what they reveal about the forces still at play in our contemporary world. New episodes are released on the second Friday of every month.
 
Join our hosts as they explore various genres in medical literature either for intellectual sustenance or for joy and entertainment. The ReachMD Book Club Series will introduce authors and topics to enliven and transform your reading experience. This series features a diverse array of medically-centered genres such as biographies and autobiographies, historicals, and contemporary fiction/non-fiction.
 
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BULAQ | بولاق

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BULAQ | بولاق

Ursula Lindsey and M Lynx Qualey

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BULAQ is a podcast about contemporary writing from and about the Middle East and North Africa. We talk about books written in Aleppo, Cairo, Marrakech and beyond. We look at the Arab region through the lens of literature, and we look at literature -- what it does, why it matters, how it relates to society and history and politics -- from the point of view of this part of the world. BULAQ is hosted by Ursula Lindsey and M Lynx Qualey and co-produced by Sowt.
 
Stories about how literature sounds. SpokenWeb is a monthly podcast that shares stories from the audio archives of Canadian literary history. Drawing on Canadian literary archival recordings from across Canada, episodes are snapshots of Canadian literary history and contemporary responses to it, including interviews, panel discussions, lectures, readings, and audio essays.
 
Hosted by renowned Dark Artist Chet Zar, the Dark Art Society Podcast covers a variety of important and contemporary topics. Themes include Dark Art, literature, film, music, culture, philosophy, dreams, paranormal experiences, magick and much more! While each episode focuses on specific issues, the nature of this podcast is conversational and organic. With that said we encourage you to take up position, like a fly on the proverbial wall and tune in.
 
Point Blank is a podcast about hardboiled, noir, and detective fiction. Mixing serious analysis and humor, the co-hosts (Justin and Kurt) discuss a classic or contemporary work of crime fiction each episode. In addition to major works, they offer shorter reviews, and examine noir-ish topics such as alcoholism in detective fiction, the femme fatale, and race and labor in crime fiction. Stroll with Kurt and Justin down the rain drenched alleys and mean streets as they explore the fascinating w ...
 
Bookworms Tara Khandelwal and Michelle D'costa chat with India's best contemporary writers like Manu Pillai, Lisa Ray, Avni Doshi and more. Readers will get insights into their favourite authors' lives. If you've always wanted to know about your favourite writers' routines, where they get their ideas from, how they deal with rejection and more, then this podcast is for you. Listen to some of India's most talented minds reveal their creative secrets on this podcast! Tune in every Wednesday fo ...
 
Each episode, Scottish author Craig Woods, musician James Hamilton and comic book connoisseur Alan Todd set out to discuss cult TV, music, comics, books, movies, TTRPG & other phenomena of the contemporary cultural landscape over drinks, inadvertently veering wildly off-topic. And that's Hauf the Bottle!
 
ART | ARTISTS | BOOKS | POETRY David Krut Projects is an alternative arts institution dedicated to encouraging an awareness of and careers in the arts and related literature and media, and to promoting contemporary culture in a dynamic, collaborative environment. In Johannesburg, we have exhibition project spaces and an adjacent bookstore; and the David Krut Print Workshop (DKW), based at Arts on Main, Maboneng. DKP‘s Podcasts is a series of episodes from our various artists about their prac ...
 
Listen to Hindi literature in a new way. Matlabi Kahaniyan is a Sochcast dedicated to Hindi Language and Literature. Amit will narrate Short literary Stories written by contemporary authors who are serving the literature through their art. This is an opportunity for you to listen to Hindi language and enjoy some of the best stories,all while learning about this culture.Amit will narrate these stories in an entertaining and engaging manner to keep listeners hooked on.
 
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Reading the Rainbow

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Reading the Rainbow

Dauphin County Library System

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Reading the Rainbow is hosted by the LGBTQ+ library staff of the Dauphin County Library System in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. We work with tens of thousands of books. When we come across good own-voiced queer literature, we want everyone to know about it! And who doesn't love discussing a good book with other book geeks? From scifi and contemporary, to romance and YA, we'll read it all, as long as it's good and gay!
 
Science Fiction is speculative literature that generally explores the consequences of ideas which are roughly consistent with nature and scientific method, but are not facts of the author’s contemporary world. The stories often represent philosophical thought experiments presented in entertaining ways. Protagonists typically “think” rather than “shoot” their way out of problems, but the definition is flexible because there are no limits on an author’s imagination. The reader-selected stories ...
 
How do you know a good book when you see it? What books are really worth reading? The purpose of this conversation is to help mothers and fathers identify books that will liberate their children to embrace truth, goodness, and beauty. We’ll be pondering questions of life and lifestyle as we seek to become people who live deeply and read deeply, drawing our children into the adventure of reading and living.
 
THE SPIRIT OF AMERICAN LITERATURE is a collection of essays reviewing contemporary authors on the literary scene at the turn of the century and assessing the uniquely American characteristics of their growing body of work. Excerpted from the author’s preface: “In this book something is said about most, if not quite all, of the emergent figures in American literature; an attempt is made to survey the four corners of the national library and to give an impression of its shape and size. If its ...
 
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Bad Audiobooks

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Bad Audiobooks

TMBC Productions,audiobooks,novels,books,literature,classic fiction,book club,storytelling,serial,sherlock holmes,hardy boys,lovecraft,fairy tales,grimm,classic stories,fairytales,comedy,parody

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Bad Audiobooks is a parody podcast hosted by Nick Mazmanian and Kent Heidelman, who help you endure all forms of literature by reading books in ridiculous voices and roasting them for your enjoyment. The show rotates between classic, contemporary, and terrible stories. Never quite knowing the real text until they're reading/ruining it, Nick and Kent bring down the high brow world of novels for you through their twisted lens of comedy.
 
A podcast where two snarky librarians read each other's book recommendations. Haven't read this episodes book? Don't worry Carly and Lisa will go over the plot, characters and themes so you have the context you need to understand our cleaver - and often flippant - observations. The librarians alternate between literary and horror titles every other Sunday.
 
Dracula tells the tale of a sinister Transylvanian aristocrat who seeks to retain his youth and strength by feeding off human blood. The author, Bram Stoker, a young Victorian theater professional, was probably inspired by the strange epidemic of vampirism that occurred in remote parts of Eastern Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. These stories were recounted by travelers who later arrived in England and other parts of Western Europe. Stoker initially meant the tale to be written as a pl ...
 
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Open Stacks

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Open Stacks

The Seminary Co-op Bookstores & UChicago Podcast Network

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Open Stacks brings you conversations with scholars, poets, novelists and activists on subjects as eclectic as the books on our shelves, from under-the-radar debates in the academy to pressing contemporary social issues, and from bestselling works of fiction to avant-garde poetics. Recorded live at Chicago's Seminary Co-op Bookstores, Open Stacks invites listeners to sit in on the kind of candid discussions and lively debates made possible by the participation of readers in a public space, wi ...
 
PennSound Podcasts are hosted by PennSound's co-director, Al Filreis. PennSound was created in 2003 in order to produce new audio recordings and to preserving existing audio archives of poets reading their own work and discussing poetry and poetics - and to make these available to everyone through free downloadable sound files. PennSound is a project of the Center for Programs in Contemporary Writing at the University of Pennsylvania
 
This will be a platform to discuss a wide variety of topics including, current events, politics, culture, literature, education and the like. I want to take deep dives into the areas of heroism or the lack of it in contemporary culture, courage, overcoming fear, risk taking, mentorship, leadership and peak performance. I will host frequent guests and subject matter experts to help facilitate these discussions.
 
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As the Artistic Director of Theater of War Productions, Bryan Doerries has joined his colleagues in using dramatic readings and community conversations to confront topics such as combat-related psychological injury, end-of-life care, radicalized violence, incarceration, gun violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, the refugee crisis, and addict…
 
Join the conversation with Jenny Richeson, CCC/SLP (see @thespeechpoet) and discover what a speech-language pathologist does. What is Jenny's connection between her work as a SLP and the poetry she creates? What does reading ability have to do with self-regulation? Consider with us how education is more formation than information. And hear Charity'…
 
Around the beginning of the twentieth century, Jewish writers and artists across Europe began depicting fellow Jews as savages or "primitive" tribesmen. Primitivism—the European appreciation of and fascination with so-called "primitive," non-Western peoples who were also subjugated and denigrated—was a powerful artistic critique of the modern world…
 
Writing the Big Book: The Creation of A.A. by William Schaberg We have to go back to 1979, the seminal scholarly account of early history, Not God: The History of Alcoholics Anonymous by Ernie Kurtz. It took 40 years for the next deep dive of this caliber. In 2019, Writing the Big Book: The Creation of A.A. by William Schaberg drew on over a decade…
 
Find out why she decided to explore male friendship and class differences in her debut novel. Tara and Michelle chat with Shivani about how she chose the title ‘Equations’ and the challenge of diving into the minds of male characters. She shares her experience of growing up around literary women like Namita Gokhale and Meru Gokhale. Does Indian fic…
 
As the first state to legalize same-sex marriage in Asia and host the first annual gay pride in the Sinophone Pacific, Taiwan is a historic center of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer culture. With this blazing path of activism, queer Taiwanese literature has also risen in prominence and there is a growing popular interest in stories a…
 
In his new book cum manifesto, Islamicate Cosmopolitan Spirit (Wiley-Blackwell, 2021), legendary scholar of Islam Bruce Lawrence outlines his politico-conceptual manifesto for the study and place of Islam in the modern world. He does so by expounding, lyrically and brilliantly, on the key category of his book that also forms its title: "Islamicate …
 
How do people link the past to the present, marking continuity in the face of the fundamental discontinuities of history? A Time to Gather: Archives and the Control of Jewish Culture (Oxford UP, 2021) argues that historical records took on potent value in modern Jewish life as both sources of history and anchors of memory because archives presented…
 
Yes, John Milton was important, and yes, Paradise Lost has been part of the canon since the 17th century - but why should we read anything by John Milton today? Do we imbibe his poetry like medicine? Is it a slog through cerebral but sterile prose? Or is there something wilder, more compelling, more alive? In this episode, Jacke talks to biographer…
 
Hello, friends! Have your journals at the ready, pull up a bleacher at the basketball court, and make yourself uncomfortable at Magda’s Big House, because fSobriety is back (finally!) on the Mr Robot rewatch train. Join our hosts as they set out to offer a necessary corrective to season two’s original lukewarm reception and make a case for its over…
 
In this episode, Britt Lawton interviews Hemali Khoosal, a local, award winning Johannesburg artists. With the help of Printer Sarah Judge, Khoosal created a series of oil-based monotypes at the David Krut Workshop. These monotypes will form part of the upcoming monotype exhibition called "Alone of its Kind". In this podcast we hear all about Khoos…
 
Western ruins have long been understood as objects riddled with temporal contradictions, whether they appear in baroque poetry and drama, Romanticism’s nostalgic view of history, eighteenth-century paintings of classical subjects, or even recent photographic histories of the ruins of postindustrial Detroit. Decay and Afterlife: Form, Time, and the …
 
Kristin Waters' book Maria W. Stewart and the Roots of Black Political Thought (U Mississippi Press, 2021) tells a crucial, almost-forgotten story of African Americans of early nineteenth-century America. In 1833, Maria W. Stewart (1803–1879) told a gathering at the African Masonic Hall on Boston’s Beacon Hill: “African rights and liberty is a subj…
 
Environmental protection and climate actions has embedded in China’s foreign policy and the Chinese government has recently pledged to make the Belt and Road Initiative “open, green, and clean”. How far is this an agenda designed primarily for international consumption? How do domestic interest groups respond to China’s environmental foreign relati…
 
Renée Franklin, Chief Diversity Officer for the St. Louis Art Museum, stopped by to speak with Nancy about her role at the Museum, and the Romare Bearden Graduate Museum Fellowship, among other topics. Renée Brummell Franklin is the Chief Diversity Officer at the The Saint Louis Art Museum, a new position that will oversee the implementation of a r…
 
In Kindred Spirits: Friendship and Resistance at the Edges of Modern Catholicism (University of Chicago Press, 2021), Brenna Moore takes us inside a global network of Catholic historians, theologians, poets, and activists who pushed against both the far-right surge in interwar Europe and the secularizing tendencies of the leftist movements active i…
 
Join host Britt Lawton and Serbian born artist Maja Maljević in this long overdue episode. The pair are in conversation about Maljević's artistic process, visual language and inspiration, the relationship between printmaking and painting, the artists experience with collaboration and overcoming challenges as a creative process. Maja also takes us t…
 
Our second January Novel Dialogue conversation is with Caryl Phillips, professor of English at Yale and world-renowned for novels ranging from The Final Passage to 2018’s A View of the Empire at Sunset. He shares his thoughts on transplantation, on performance, on race, even on sports. Joining him here are John and the wonderful comparatist Corina …
 
Probably the most well-known Chinese philosopher around the world is Kongzi, typically called by his Latinized name, “Confucius.” And yet he did not write a single book. Rather, his students collected Kongzi’s life and teachings into the Analects, a text which has become immensely influential from ancient Confucian traditions up to the current day.…
 
The border between Russia and China is one of the world’s longest, spanning thousands of miles. It’s one of the few extended land borders between two great powers, subject to years of history, conflict and cooperation. Yet for such an important division, there are surprisingly few crossings, with not one passenger bridge in operation. On the Edge: …
 
Probably the most well-known Chinese philosopher around the world is Kongzi, typically called by his Latinized name, “Confucius.” And yet he did not write a single book. Rather, his students collected Kongzi’s life and teachings into the Analects, a text which has become immensely influential from ancient Confucian traditions up to the current day.…
 
Jacke had big plans to make this episode all about the poetry of William Butler Yeats...and then listener feedback to the last episode overtook him. So instead of lazing about on the Lake Isle of Innisfree, he returns to the subject of Sophocles and the power of literature, as introduced in the conversation with Bryan Doerries, the Artistic Directo…
 
This week I catch up with the incredible dark artist/DAS member Jamie Wells! We talk about being a super shy kid growing up and how art helped her cope, choosing an artistic path, becoming a successful Twitch streamer, our mutual love of bugs, getting into NFTs and tons more! Another great conversation with a great artist!Jamies links:NFT Twitter: …
 
In this episode, Britt Lawton gets to know more about Cape Town based artist Fanie Buys. Fanie produced a series of watercolour monotypes with the David Krut Workshop and Printer Roxy Kaczmarek ahead of a monotype group exhibition - Alone of its Kind - in Johannesburg, 2022. We find out how Fanie Buys became an artist, what his inspiration and prac…
 
Nicholas Canny is an Emeritus Professor at the National University of Ireland-Galway (NUIG). Since completing his PhD at the University of Pennsylvania he has pursued an influential publishing career spanning the early 1970s until today. He is the author or editor of 11 books and has written over 70 published papers. He was founding Director of the…
 
Join romance authors Brigitte Bautista (link: https://www.romanceclassbooks.com/book-author/brigitte-bautista/), Ana Tejano (link: https://www.anatejano.com/) and Mina V. Esguerra (link: https://minavesguerra.com) live as they talk about the romance trope "friends to lovers". Fall Like Rain (link: https://amzn.to/3FA3cdz) by Ana Tejano You, Me, U.S…
 
We are back! Sorry for the delay. We needed an extended holiday break. In this episode, we discuss Tartan/Scottish Noir through the lens of what is considered the first Tartan Noir Laidlaw. Laidlaw is a gritty detective novel taking place on the streets of Glasgow in the 1970s. William McIlvanney or Gus to his friends is considered the father of Sc…
 
Find out how she sheds light on the lost stories of extraordinary women in medicine in her non-fiction book. Tara and Michelle chat with Kavitha Rao about her research process - piecing together information through letters and memoirs - and how she chose which women to feature in the book. They discuss the role of sensitivity readers and why writin…
 
Although largely unknown in the West, the Russian novelist and political essayist Konstantin Nikolaevich Leontiev (1831-1891) has left a strong legacy in his homeland. He has often been compared to Friedrich Nietzsche, yet his writings predate those of his German counterpart by several decades. Also, unlike his German counterpart came to embrace a …
 
Attempting to derive aesthetic systems from natural structures of human cognition, designers looked toward the “savage mind”—a way of thinking they associated with a racialized subaltern. In Savage Mind to Savage Machine: Racial Science and Twentieth-Century Design (U Minnesota Press, 2021), Ginger Nolan uncovers an enduring relationship between “t…
 
The Marion Thompson Wright Reader, edited by Graham Russell Gao Hodges, the George Dorland Langdon, Jr. Professor of History and Africana and Latin American Studies at Colgate University, and the author of Black New Jersey: 1664 to the Present Day (Rutgers University Press, 2019), is the first book-length text on Marion Thompson Wright—the first Af…
 
In Partisan Aesthetics: Modern Art and India's Long Decolonization (Stanford UP, 2020), Sanjukta Sunderason explores art's entanglements with histories of war, famine, mass politics and displacements that marked late-colonial and postcolonial India. Introducing "partisan aesthetics" as a conceptual grid, the book identifies ways in which art became…
 
In Folk Literati, Contested Tradition, and Heritage in Contemporary China: Incense Is Kept Burning (Indiana UP, 2020), Ziying You explores the role of the "folk literati" in negotiating, defining, and maintaining local cultural heritage. Expanding on the idea of the elite literati―a widely studied pre-modern Chinese social group, influential in cul…
 
How does Ultra-Orthodox Jewish literature describe the male body? What does the body represent? What is the ideal male body? In The Male Body in Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Theology, published in 2021 by Pickwick Publications, Yakir Englander presents a philosophical-theological exploration of the different images of the male body in Ultra-Orthodox liter…
 
The overwhelming majority of tea practitioners in contemporary Japan are women, but there has been little discussion on their historical role in tea culture (chanoyu). In Cultivating Femininity: Women and Tea Culture in Edo and Meiji Japan (U Hawaii Press, 2019), Rebecca Corbett (USC East Asian Library) writes women back into this history and shows…
 
This ShortCuts episode responds to poet Daphne Marlatt’s conversation with Karis Shearer and Megan Butchart in the recent SpokenWeb Podcast episode “SoundBox Signals presents Performing the Archive.” By listening to audio from Marlatt’s previous archival performances, ShortCuts producer Katherine McLeod considers how we remember feelings attached t…
 
Today we are releasing episode #168 of PoemTalk, in which Amber Rose Johnson, Daniel Bergmann, and Yolanda Wisher meet up at the Kelly Writers House to talk with Al Filreis about Jayne Cortez's "She Got He Got". This poem/performance piece is comprised of a “She” half and an “He” half, she giving variations of hot, while he instantiates variations …
 
Following the fall of the Berlin Wall and demise of the Soviet Union, prominent Western thinkers began to suggest that liberal democracy had triumphed decisively on the world stage. Having banished fascism in World War II, liberalism had now buried communism, and the result would be an end of major ideological conflicts, as liberal norms and instit…
 
A three-thousand-year history of the Yellow River and the legacy of interactions between humans and the natural landscape From Neolithic times to the present day, the Yellow River and its watershed have both shaped and been shaped by human society. Using the Yellow River to illustrate the long-term effects of environmentally significant human activ…
 
In this episode, presented in collaboration with the Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation, Monash University, we investigate Sing This at My Funeral: A Memoir of Fathers and Sons, written by David Slucki and published in 2019. The title of the book references "Di Shvue" – the anthem of the Jewish Labor Bund. Dr. Slucki, the Loti Smorgon Associ…
 
Plastics have been a defining feature of contemporary life since at least the 1960s. Yet our proliferating use of plastics has also triggered catastrophic environmental consequences. Plastics are derived from petrochemicals and enmeshed with the global oil economy, and they permeate our consumer goods and their packaging, our clothing and buildings…
 
Timothy Brennan is Professor of Comparative Literature, Cultural Studies, and English at the University of Minnesota. He is the author of several seminal books in literary studies, including Borrowed Light: Vico, Hegel, and the Colonies, published by Stanford University Press in 2014, Secular Devotion: Afro-Latin Music and Imperial Jazz published b…
 
Join the conversation with author Claire Swinarski as we discuss how it is possible to write realistic, contemporary middle grade fiction--with a mainstream publisher--and still have content that points readers to truth and goodness. Claire shares how important it is to tackle tough topics with middle schoolers in a hopeful, virtuous, and non-borin…
 
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