show episodes
 
Computers touch all most every aspect of our lives today. We take the way they work for granted and the unsung heroes who built the technology, protocols, philosophies, and circuit boards, patched them all together - and sometimes willed amazingness out of nothing. Not in this podcast. Welcome to the History of Computing. Let's get our nerd on!
 
Computers and science are intertwined – and not just as tools that help humans connect and collaborate. With computers, scientists model the earth’s climate, design alternative energy strategies and simulate exploding stars. From laptops to the world’s fastest supercomputers, software innovations and artificial intelligence are reshaping how we interact with mounds of data from healthcare to high-energy physics and how we solve critical problems. Computational science brings together mathema ...
 
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The Edtech Podcast

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The Edtech Podcast

Sophie Bailey, @soph_bailey

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The mission of The Edtech Podcast is to improve the dialogue between ‘ed’ and ‘tech’ through storytelling, for better innovation and impact. Our audience consists of education leaders from around the world, plus start ups, learning and development specialists, bluechips, investors, Government and media. The Edtech Podcast is downloaded 2000+ each week from 145 countries in total, with UK, US & Australia the top 3 downloading countries. Podcast series have included Future Tech for Education, ...
 
Have you been forced to work from home by your employer? Have you been laid off and are feeling depressed at home? Do you want to make money while working from home? When your W-2 world changes and you're told to work from home, or when work sends you home and tells you that you have to use vacation time if you want to get paid, it's time to figure out how. Adam Schroeder and Naresh Vissa have been working from home for over a decade each, and are here to teach you how to not only prove your ...
 
Welcome to a brand new show from Data Skeptic entitled "Journal Club". Each episode will feature a regular panel and one revolving guest seat. The group will discuss a few topics related to data science and focus on one featured scholarly paper which is discussed in detail.
 
The Uptake with Anna Chu is a new show on all things tech and community. Host Anna Chu will be traveling and introducing you to people all over the world as she follows the path of Microsoft Ignite The Tour. The show covers topics in the world of tech, as well as uncovers people’s journeys - and how-tos - of professional learning, development and community building. You will meet inspiring people in the community of tech and get inspired to be a part of a vast and expanding community in your ...
 
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show series
 
Gene Amdahl grew up in South Dakota and as with many during the early days of computing went into the Navy during World War II. He got his degree from South Dakota State in 1948 and went on to the University of Wisconsin-Madison for his PhD, where he got the bug for computers in 1952, joining the ranks of IBM that year. At IBM he worked on the icon…
 
How can you as a person, employee, and/or business owner, establish trust among people, bosses, and/or customers? Well there are certain truths that can get you to that place, and David Horsager joins Adam and Naresh to discuss just what those are. David explains how you can establish that trust even from the comfort of your own home. David is the …
 
Chocolate. It’s rare to find anyone who isn’t partial to a square or two of this delicious treat. But is its very existence in danger? (*Cue worried faces.*) In this episode of the Big Questions Podcast we chat to chocoholic and researcher Acheampong Atta-Boateng, who studies the relationship between cocoa trees and their micro-pollinators. We hear…
 
In this episode of The Rabbit Hole, we unpack the recent outages of Facebook's servers, looking at why this might have happened, some of the more ludicrous theories that have been offered as explanations, lessons to take away, and why the downtime was worse than just a day of limited social media access for many people. With Facebook, Whatsapp, and…
 
In this episode, the power of wild, creative thinking with Jaime and Martin from Cosmic Kids Yoga (over 1m subscribers). We chat about; How to channel your energy as an educator when teaching remotely How to evaluate and prioritise new tech tools Bootstrapping successfully and staying lean and true to your values Listening to your customers for new…
 
DTSS, or The Dartmouth Time Sharing System, began at Dartmouth College in 1963. That was the same year Project MAC started at MIT, which is where we got Multics, which inspired Unix. Both contributed in their own way to the rise of the Time Sharing movement, an era in computing when people logged into computers over teletype devices and ran computi…
 
During the lockdowns we saw many parts of the environment start coming back to life as humans had less of a footprint on the outside world. Will that become a trends as we move out of the Covid world or will we go back to business as normal? What can we learn about our time working from home that we can implement moving forward to help our world an…
 
Avoiding the changing climate’s most extreme impacts will require a technological revolution to power daily life from renewable sources. An entrepreneur, an engineering professor and a DOE-laboratory materials scientist – all DOE CSGF and Massachusetts Institute of Technology alumni – discuss technical challenges from nuclear energy to heat transfe…
 
We talk about a lot of immigrants in this podcast. There’s the Hungarian mathemeticians and scientists that helped usher in the nuclear age and were pivotal in the early days of computing. There are the Germans who found a safe haven in the US following World War II. There are a number of Jewish immigrants who fled persecution, like Jack Tramiel - …
 
Making happy money can make everything about your life better. But what is it, and (perhaps just as important) how can we teach our children about it? Ken Honda, New York Times' bestselling author of Happy Money: The Japanese Art of Making Peace with Your Money, joins Adam and Naresh to discuss his concept of happy money, and how it can VASTLY impr…
 
This episode is the final one in our Aristotle Project series. Over the past few episodes we have covered psychological safety, dependability, structure and clarity, meaning and last but not least, impact. Impact has a variety of ways that it can be defined, which makes for an interesting discussion. Traditionally, profitability has been the main m…
 
Ross Perot built two powerhouse companies and changed the way politicians communicate with their constituents. Perot was an Eagle Scout who went on to join the US Naval Academy in 1949, and served in the Navy until the late 1950s. He then joined the IBM sales organization and one year ended up meeting his quota in the second week of the year. He ha…
 
Alicia Magann got her start in control systems engineering research, exploring tools for controlling large-scale chemical processes. As a Ph.D. student, she turned the dials of quantum chemistry in Herschel Rabitz’s research group at Princeton University with support from the DOE CSGF. She talks about her work on quantum algorithms, her cross-count…
 
The Covid-19 pandemic has shown us all the flaws in the US healthcare system. But what can we do to solve the issues facing it? Dr. Alejandro Badia, hand and upper extremity surgeon at Badia Hand to Shoulder Center in Doral, Florida; co-founder of Miami Anatomical Research Center (M.A.R.C.); bestselling author of Healthcare From The Trenches: An In…
 
In this episode, we look at what happened to edtech in China, covering regulations introduced earlier this year that are changing the way that online tutoring is conducted across China, and looking at what that means for the sector, learners and educators more generally. Plus, new jobs, funding, and startup support. Guests: Emily Tate, Senior Repor…
 
In today's episode, we dive into the subject of estimations and pointing. For most teams, there needs to be a way to communicate the size, complexity, and difficulty of any task or project, and the different frameworks that have gained popularity have degrees of utility, strength, and weakness. To get to grips with these, we discuss, planning poker…
 
The Osborne Effect isn’t an episode about Spider-Man that covers turning green or orange and throwing bombs off little hoverboards. Instead it’s about the impact of The Osborne 1 computer on the history of computers. Although many might find discussing the Green Goblin or Hobgoblin much more interesting. The Osborne 1 has an important place in the …
 
What is the future of work? What is our new world going to look like once everything is back up and running in the world? Adam and Naresh are joined by Dr. Jay W. Richards to discuss these topics, how the free market and individual responsibility can save the American Dream, and why we don't live in a zero sum world. Jay is a Professor in the Busch…
 
Financial security, building working relationships, having a positive impact on the people around you; which of these examples resonates with the way you find meaning in your work? It could be one of them, or all or them, or you may have completely different sources of meaning. In today’s episode, my guest, Sophie Creutz, and I, share how we person…
 
Hello listeners! Hello everyone and welcome back to The Edtech Podcast. Our mission is to improve the dialogue between ed and tech for better innovation and impact and it’s great to be back. What's in this episode? In this episode, I'm joined by guests to talk about all things audio and learning. We look back at the varied history of audio and lear…
 
Chess is a game that came out of 7th century India, originally called chaturanga. It evolved over time, perfecting the rules - and spread to the Persians from there. It then followed the Moorish conquerers from Northern Africa to Spain and from there spread through Europe. It also spread from there up into Russia and across the Silk Road to China. …
 
Curiosity, mentors and a summer working in concrete with his grandfather shaped Quentarius Moore’s science career studying 2-D materials. He recently completed his fourth year as a DOE CSGF recipient, while pursuing a chemistry Ph.D. at Texas A&M University. He completed both his bachelor's and master's degrees in chemistry at Jackson State Univers…
 
Public speaking is something we associate with in person gatherings. But the pandemic has shown us that public speaking applies in virtual settings as well. Considering that public speaking is one of humanities greatest fears, it's something we need to focus on to overcome and succeed, no matter where we're working. Adam and Naresh are joined by Mi…
 
Leading up to today’s discussion, we have talked about the psychological safety, and dependability of the Aristotle Project. Today, we tackle structure and clarity. We discuss a statement that lists understanding of job expectations, the process for fulfilling them, and knowing the consequences of one’s performance as important pillars for team eff…
 
The Soviet Union detonated their first nuclear bomb in 1949, releasing 20 kilotons worth of an explosion and sparking the nuclear arms race. A weather reconnaissance mission confirmed that the Soviets did so and Klaus Fuchs was arrested for espionage, after passing blueprints for the Fat Man bomb that had been dropped on Japan. A common name in the…
 
What is the life of a digital nomad really like? How can you do it when you actually have children? There are so many logistics that have to be handled, but Chris Elliott has conquered them all. Adam and Naresh are joined by Chris, who is the founder of Elliott Advocacy, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that empowers consumers to solve their prob…
 
Today we continue our exploration of the Aristotle Project, and we are joined by Sophie Creutz to discuss dependability. Dependability is one of the factors that Google found to be most impactful on the success of a team and to kick things off we run through this list again, as well as some of the surprising things that are not correlated to a team…
 
IBM is the company with nine lives. They began out of the era of mechanical and electro-mechanical punch card computing. They helped bring the mainframe era to the commercial market. They played their part during World War II. They helped make the transistorized computer mainstream with the S360. They helped bring the PC into the home. We’ve covere…
 
Hello again listeners! Hello everyone and welcome back to The Edtech Podcast. Our mission is to improve the dialogue between ed and tech for better innovation and impact and it’s great to be back. What's in this episode? This week we’ve got Thomas Moule, author of Cracking Social Mobility: how AI and other innovations can help to level the playing …
 
Starting companies from home used to be more out of necessity than anything else. Nowadays, however, it's more part of the model for many startups. But there's a big difference between a "remote first" and "remote-friendly" companies. Adam and Naresh are joined by Alexander Torrenegra, CEO of Torre, a professional networking platform for remote and…
 
Safety in an office environment might not be something most people think about. Unlike working in a job that requires manual labor, dangers in an office are less visible. That does not make them more serious. In today’s episode, we discuss psychological safety and what this entails. There is a range of definitions for the concept, but it should be …
 
Today's episode on spam is read by the illustrious Joel Rennich. Spam is irrelevant or inappropriate and unsolicited messages usually sent to a large number of recipients through electronic means. And while we probably think of spam as something new today, it’s worth noting that the first documented piece of spam was sent in 1864 - through the tele…
 
They say that everyone has a story inside them, but Tehlor Kay Mejia had #1 New York Time best sellers in her at a very young age. Tehlor joins Adam and Naresh to discuss how she creates the stories she's writing (like her new book Paola Santiago and the Forest of Nightmares), how she managed to get connected with renowned author Rick Riordan, and …
 
Are premortems as morbid as their name suggests or are they difficult but necessary measures to take for identifying possible future threats? This is the topic we explore today and we have our guest extraordinaire Sophie Creutz back on the show to help us tackle it. Our discussion is filled with strong arguments from both sides of the table. On the…
 
The simple story of Yahoo! Is that they were an Internet search company that came out of Stanford during the early days of the web. They weren’t the first nor the last. But they represent a defining moment in the rise of the web as we know it today, when there was enough content out there that there needed to be an easily searchable catalog of cont…
 
Heidi St. John, known as "The Busy Mom", is a Congressional Candidate in the GOP primary for the 3rd District of Washington State; #1 bestselling author of Bible Promises for Moms, Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling, Becoming MomStrong: How to Fight with All That's in You for Your Family and Your F…
 
Today we have a really fun episode in which we are joined by our friend Sophie Creutz to discuss the parallels between Dungeons & Dragons and the world of software development! There are clear links and common threads that seem to run between these two worlds and we start off this conversation considering why the game of D&D might immediately appea…
 
What is the nature of innovation? Is it overhearing a conversation as with Morse and the telegraph? Working with the deaf as with Bell? Divine inspiration? Necessity? Science fiction? Or given that the answer to all of these is yes, is it really more the intersectionality between them and multiple basic and applied sciences with deeper understandin…
 
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