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Broken Law

1
Broken Law

American Constitution Society

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Weekly
 
Ever feel like the law is stacked against you? It probably is. Broken Law speaks truth to power in discussing how our laws and legal system serve the few at the expense of the many. This is where law meets real life. Hosted by the staff of the American Constitution Society, we reckon with the origins of our legal system, interview people on the frontlines of the progressive legal movement, and chat about necessary legal reforms to restore our democratic legitimacy and improve the lives of al ...
 
Starting June 19th the Deep Dive podcast will become Panic: Queer True Crime, a podcast, and youtube channel. Season one and two will remain here and on the website. https://reggiedeepdive.com/queerpanicdive/ A little bit about Panic. I created this true-crime channel to focus on the life and murders of LGBTQ+ people. I called the channel Panic because for much more of the recorded history of LGBTQ+ folks there’s been a panic. By investigating everything from hate crimes to domestic violence ...
 
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Creative Tension

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Creative Tension

Elliott Robinson, JD, MDiv - Public Theologian

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Monthly
 
The Creative Tension podcast explores the history and legacy of Jim Crow segregation. Host, Elliott Robinson provides the missing chapters from American History class, through a mixture of interviews, archival audio and roundtable discussions. Creative Tension also uses open and frank discussions, to dissect how the legacy of Jim Crow is still impacting our world today. Creative Tension explores topics like: Confederate monuments; “The Talk;” Black caricatures (Mammy, Aunt Jemima and JJ Evan ...
 
Facing History and Ourselves is an organization created in 1976 by educators who believed that instilling intellectual vigor and curiosity goes hand-in-hand with teaching facts and figures. We provide training, professional development, and resources that support the practical needs, and the spirits, of educators worldwide who share the goal of creating a better, more informed, and more thoughtful society. Our podcast series features voices from the Facing History community and encourages cr ...
 
Southern Hollows is home to the dark side of southern history. These true stories, often little known, take you into historical moments and introduce you to historical figures that we ought never forget. Hear stories of the well-known United States history periods like Reconstruction, Jim Crow, Civil Rights, and Native American Removal, but also stories of the individuals who oppressed and disenfranchised -- and the historical settings that made it possible. If you love challenging stories f ...
 
Meet BlackFacts.com, the Internet's longest running Black History Encyclopedia - Delivering Black History, Culture, Vides and News to our followers. This podcast series provides your daily Black Facts Of The Day™. In addition there will be occasion bonus episodes focused on diversity or other key topics of interest to our BlackFacts audience Learn black history, Teach black history - https://blackfacts.com
 
The church and religion has played and continues to play a big role in the African-American community. Yet, many of us who grew up in the traditional black church do not have an understanding of how our faith evolved under the duress of slavery and discrimination to be and to represent what it does today. The purpose of this broadcast is to provide that background knowledge while also pointing out the dividing line between what is just tradition and true faith in Jesus Christ.
 
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show series
 
Today’s episode picks up where we left off last week, with Part II of our election debrief. First, Lindsay Langholz and Jeanne Hruska take a look at the ballot measures that voters weighed in on in 2022 and the potential for future progressive wins using this powerful tool. Second, Lindsay speaks with Marcia Johnson-Blanco and Anna Chu on election …
 
This week, Joi Chaney, Executive Director of the Washington Bureau and Senior Vice President of Policy and Advocacy at the National Urban League, sits down with Terrance Woodbury, founding partner of HIIT Strategies. Together, they discuss midterm election results, the ‘red wave’ that never happened, and what to expect with Georgia’s upcoming run o…
 
Now that Election Day has come and gone, we are going to take a look at what worked, what didn’t, and what to keep an eye on looking ahead to 2023 and 2024. There is so much to debrief that we will be covering this in two episodes. On Part I of our debrief, Lindsay Langholz speaks with Jessica Huseman about democracy being on the ballot and to debr…
 
The Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) has been a successful federal law since it was enacted in 1978 and is considered by many experts to be the gold standard of child welfare practices. And yet, decades later, a federal court ruled ICWA unconstitutional in a widely criticized 2021 decision. The case, Brackeen v. Haaland, is now before the Supreme Co…
 
In the 1920s through the 1960s indecent proposals, indecent advances, and honor slayings were all buzzwords used to explain one man's rationale for killing another. The handsome singer Louis Kenneth Neu murdered two men for their clothes, their cars, their cash, and his honor. When 35-year-old Lawrence Shead didn't arrive for work his Patterson, Ne…
 
This week, we are going to break down the epic 5+ hour long oral arguments that the Supreme Court heard in two related cases about affirmative action in higher education. It seems, yet again, even well-established precedent is open for re-examination by this packed Court. Lindsay Langholz is joined by Professor Vinay Harpalani to break down the ora…
 
This week, Joi Chaney, Executive Director of the Washington Bureau and SVP of Policy and Advocacy of the National Urban League, sits down with Laphonza Butler, President of Emily’s List, and Latosha Brown, Co-Founder of Black Voters Matter. Together, they discuss the issues voters care about most, races and candidates we should watch out for, and a…
 
This week, Joi Chaney, Executive Director of the Washington Bureau and SVP of Policy and Advocacy at the National Urban League sits down with Congresswoman Gwen Moore, who currently represents Wisconsin's 4th district. She has served in this seat since 2004 and was the first African American elected to Congress from the state. Congresswoman Moore d…
 
We are reportedly “post-COVID.” And yet, just recently, the National Assessment of Educational Progress reported steep declines in math and reading scores amongst U.S. fourth and eighth graders, compared to tests taken pre-COVID. This begs the question, what are ignoring or accepting when we claim we are post-COVID. This week, Jeanne Hruska is join…
 
San Francisco resident 75-year-old James Sheahan had terminal cancer but that wouldn't be his cause of death. It would be his friendship with a man whose greed and desperate need to be with the love of his life that would cost Mr. Sheahan dearly. To report elder abuse or find services for older adults and their families, visit The Eldercare Locator…
 
As millions of student loan debt borrowers prepare for the repayments to resume in January, Joi Chaney, our Executive Director and Senior Vice President of Policy and Advocacy at the National Urban League, sits down with Ashley Harrington, Senior Advisor at the Department of Education's Office of Federal Student Aid. Together, they discuss Presiden…
 
While much attention is being paid this election cycle on which party will control Congress come January, there are several down ballot races that will also have profound effects on our fundamental rights and on the legitimacy of our democracy. These include races for State Attorney General, Secretary of State, state court judges, and district atto…
 
We are just a few weeks out from Election Day and in several states, voters are already going to the polls. Election laws, including voting rights laws, have undergone significant change in many states since the 2020 election. Lindsay Langholz speaks with Jonathan Diaz from the Campaign Legal Center about the good, the bad, and the alarming when it…
 
On October 4, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral argument in Merrill v. Milligan, a case about Alabama's racially gerrymandered congressional map. The question looming over this case is whether the Supreme Court will destroy what remains of the Voting Rights Act. Lindsay Langholz speaks with Bradley Heard from the Southern Poverty Law Center about t…
 
The Supreme Court started its new term on October 3rd, and we are bracing for more cases where the Court could ignore precedent and judicial restraint, and eliminate safeguards to our civil rights and to our democracy. We preview several of the cases on the Court's docket and discuss their potential ramifications. These cases cover voting rights an…
 
In America, it is a fantasy to believe that people accused of a crime will have their case decided by a jury of their peers. The reality is that most convictions are achieved through plea bargains controlled by prosecutors. Is there a way to unwind this broken system of fast-tracked convictions? Christopher Wright Durocher speaks with Dan Canon, au…
 
This week, Marc Morial, President and CEO of the National Urban League and Joi Chaney, our Executive Director and Senior Vice President of Policy and Advocacy, sits down with Karine Jean-Pierre, the first Black woman, Caribbean and open-LGBTQ+ Press Secretary of the White House. Together, they discuss some of the Biden administration’s priorities a…
 
On this episode, Jeanne Hruska is joined by the co-authors of the new book, "The Constitution in Jeopardy," Russ Feingold and Peter Prindiville to discuss a dangerous effort by factions of the Right to radically rewrite the U.S. Constitution. Russ and Peter explain why more attention needs to be paid to this effort and why we need a "new kind of Co…
 
On this episode, we discuss sex, gender identity, and the Constitution. That's because we are talking about the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA) and the argument that it is already the 28th Amendment to the Constitution. Lindsay Langholz is joined by Kate Kelly, author of "Ordinary Equality," to discuss the ERA’s long journey, the women and queer activ…
 
In 1988, 55 year-old, Yale educated Dr. Richard Boggs and business partners 46 year-old, Melvin Eugene Hanson, and 25 year-old John Hawkins joined together in an insurance scam that would net them a million dollars. The only problem was, in order to get the money someone would have to die. The victim of the scheme, 36 year-old Ellis Greene was in t…
 
This is a call to action! The U.S. Senate is back in session this month, and inevitably it has competing priorities between now and the end of the year. That's where this episode comes in. Jeanne Hruska speaks with Russ Feingold, President of ACS, and Zack Gima, Vice President of Strategic Engagement at ACS, about why the Senate should prioritize j…
 
As we head back to school and in honor of Labor Day, Lindsay Langholz speaks this week with Randi Weingarten, President of the American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO, about the myriad of new state laws censoring what teachers can say in the classroom, the resurgence of book bans by school districts, and the broader, purposeful effort to toxify pu…
 
Thank you for joining me for, Intimate Partner Murders. Intimate partner and domestic violence have many of the same root causes as they do elsewhere. Here are three stories of same-sex intimate partner murder. 39-year-old, Dr. Louis Chen, his decade-long partner 29-year-old, Eric Cooper, and their adorable 2 1/2-year child moved into a gleaming Se…
 
It has been nearly two months since the Supreme Court released its decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health, overturning Roe v. Wade and throwing the issue of abortion rights to the states. On this episode, Lindsay Langholz speaks with Professor Mary Ziegler about how the aftermath of Dobbs is playing out in the states. What does Kansas say abou…
 
For decades murders of gay men were happening on the cliffs of Bondi Beaches. Between 1970 and 2010 gay men were hunted, brutally attacked, and in some cases thrown to their deaths from the cliffs of cruising spots above the beautiful beaches of Sydney, Australia. Many of these murders remain unsolved. John Russell was a barmen in Bondi he’d spent …
 
People with disabilities are the largest minority group in the United States and represent a vital voting constituency that is often overlooked. In recent years, several states have enacted voter suppression measures in the name of "election integrity," which disproportionately impact people with disabilities. Evan Monod speaks with Lia Sifuentes D…
 
It can be easy to think that the U.S. democratic system is somehow exceptional, a product and an idea to be exported abroad. But the reality is far more complicated. As U.S. democracy faces a moment of truth, there are lessons to be learned from how elections are conducted and secured in other countries. Lindsay Langholz speaks this week with Ann R…
 
Murder and financial crimes are rare but they do happen and when these crimes are coupled with the desire for love and intimacy they can be doubly complicated to escape. In this episode we’ll take a look at three men who were killed for their money. Jake Merendino thought he found a young handsome man who he could shower with gifts and affection. H…
 
The January 6th Select Committee has now held eight public hearings this summer. Its investigation is ongoing and more hearings are expected this fall. Simultaneously, more information is unfolding about DOJ's investigation into the events of January 6th, and there is separate state investigation underway in Fulton County, Georgia. This week, we di…
 
For me one of the worst types of murder are those commmitted by a family member. In this episode six people, actually seven, murdered by the family. One of the reasons I wanted to compile this list was to illustrate that homophobic hate crimes can happen anywhere from the leafy green suburbs of Los Angeles county to a small town in Iran. A note: I …
 
This week, we continue our review of consequential decisions to come from the Supreme Court this term and turn our attention to Oklahoma v. Castro-Huerta, which will have major implications for tribal sovereignty and jurisdiction going forward. To discuss the decision, Lindsay Langholz is joined by Professor Maggie Blackhawk who explains how, as sh…
 
Between 2010 and 2017 Bruce McArthur killed eight men in the city of Toronto. Despite the imploring of families and friends, despite two separate task forces looking into the missing men, it would take investigators nearly a decade to track a serial killer who had been arrested and detained for assaults and banned from Toronto’s Gay Village. Using …
 
This week, we look back at several of the big decisions that came down from the U.S. Supreme Court in its most recent term, including New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, West Virginia v. EPA, and Vega v. Tekoh. We also look ahead to a couple of the major cases coming down the pike next term and discuss the alarming trends that are a…
 
The serial killer Stephen Port was able to murder 4 men in plain sight leaving all of his victims within feet of his Barking, East London home. After Port’s trial and sentencing, several inquests were convened to look at why the police failed so spectacularly to identify and stop Stephen Port before he became a serial killer. Over the next two epis…
 
This week, Joi Chaney, our Executive Director and Senior Vice President of Policy and Advocacy, sits down with Kerrie Johnson, Executive Director of the National LGBTQ Task Force. Together they discuss the nation's reaction to the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade and its impact on the LGBTQ community and the importance of including …
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for July 5. Frederick Douglass gave his speech "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?". He was an African American abolitionist, orator, newspaper publisher, and author. He became the first Black U.S. marshal. Douglass was born into slavery on the Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Talbot Cou…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for July 4. Marian Anderson and Ralph Bunche receive the first Medals of Freedom. She was an American singer, and an important figure in the struggle for African-American artists to overcome racial prejudice. Bunche was an American political scientist, diplomat, member of the United Nations for more…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for July 3. Jackie Robinson becomes the first African American to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. He was an American professional baseball player who became the first African American to play in Major League Baseball (MLB) in the modern era. After demonstrating exceptional athletic abili…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for July 2. Lyndon Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act. In the landmark 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that racial segregation in schools was unconstitutional. The 10 years that followed saw great strides for the African American civil rights movement, as non-vio…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for July 1st. Roland Hayes named soloist with Boston Symphony Orchestra. He was the first African American singer to achieve success on the classical concert stage. Hayes was born in Curryville, Georgia, to Fanny and William Hayes, who were former slaves. He wanted an education, but he had to drop o…
 
In its latest term, the U.S. Supreme Court decided two highly consequential decisions pertaining to the religion clauses of the First Amendment: Carson v. Makin and Kennedy v. Bremerton School District. Lindsay Langholz speaks this week with Ira "Chip" Lupu, Professor Emeritus of Law at GW Law School, about these two cases, just how divergent the d…
 
Stalking is a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to feel fear. Victimconnect.org Thomas Whitney came out late in life and when he met Lawrence Wong he thought his life had finally begun. Instead, a relentless campaign of obsession would culminate in an act of violent brutality. Whitney and Wong were…
 
The U.S. Supreme Court's final decision in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health is as bad as we feared it would be. For the first time in history, our highest court has eliminated a fundamental right by overruling Roe v. Wade. On this episode, Lindsay Langholz is joined by returning guests Jenny Ma, Senior Staff Attorney with the Center for Reproductive…
 
Iris SantosThe murders of transgender women of color are alarmingly high once again this year. Frequently, transgender murders go unsolved. Here are eight transwomen of color who's murders remain unsolved. Courtney Eshay Key, Tyianna Alexander, Bianca “Muffin” Bankz, Keeva Scatter, Iris Santos, Nedra Sequence Morris, Duval Princess, Kitty Moore wer…
 
This week, Joi Chaney, our Executive Director and Senior Vice President of Policy and Advocacy, sits down with Dr. David Johns, Executive Director of the National Black Justice Coalition (NBJC). Together, they discuss how to create a safe space for Black LGBTQIA+ members within the civil rights and justice community. Discussed in this episode: LGBT…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for June 30. Lena Horne was born. She was an African-American dancer, actress, Grammy-winning singer, and civil rights activist. Horne left school at age 16 to help support her ailing mother and became a dancer at the Cotton Club in Harlem, New York City. She was discovered by producer John Hammond,…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for June 29. NAACP chairman S.G. Spottswood criticize Nixon's administration. Stephen Gill Spottswood was born in Boston, Massachusetts. He went on to Albright College, earning a B.A. in history in 1917; Gordon Divinity School; and Yale Divinity School, where he earned his doctorate. He joined the N…
 
The January 6th Select Committee held five public hearings in three weeks. Even for folks who are immersed in this, these hearings have provided a lot of information to process. Jeanne Hruska speaks with Barbara McQuade, professor at Michigan Law School and former U.S. Attorney, about the biggest takeaways from the hearings, the recent law enforcem…
 
BlackFacts.com presents the black fact of the day for June 28. The U.S. Supreme Court invalidated the use of racial quotas for university applications. The medical school at the University of California, as part of the university’s affirmative action program, had reserved 16 percent of its admission places for minority applicants. Allan Bakke, a wh…
 
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