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Since 1980, City Arts & Lectures has presented onstage conversations with outstanding figures in literature, politics, criticism, science, and the performing arts, offering the most diverse perspectives about ideas and values. City Arts & Lectures programs can be heard on more than 130 public radio stations across the country and wherever you get your podcasts. The broadcasts are co-produced with KQED 88.5 FM in San Francisco. Visit CITYARTS.NET for more info.
 
This audio series offers entertaining, informative discussions about the arts and events at the National Gallery of Art. These podcasts give access to special Gallery talks by well-known artists, authors, curators, and historians. Included in this podcast listing are established series: The Diamonstein-Spielvogel Lecture Series, The Sydney J. Freedberg Lecture in Italian Art, Elson Lecture Series, A. W. Mellon Lectures in the Fine Arts, Conversationricans with Artists Series, Conversations w ...
 
Do you want to like craft beer but don't know where to start? Do you feel like having a favorite Doppelbock will earn you street cred? (Wait. What's Doppelbock, again?) Drinking Biddies Keryl Brown and Jamie Tunkel will always drink a bottle on air, review it, tell stories, and discover a few things about beer along the way. They'll sometimes have guests and sometimes be antisocial. They're just two girls on a journey. A beer journey. Disclaimer: If you're looking for boring, informational l ...
 
The "Lapses" project, developed for the Pavilion of Turkey, consists of projects that demonstrate how the perception of "occurring events" can vary and lead to the differing narrations of history because of lapses in collective memory. The project has been realized through works by two artists: Banu Cennetoglu's "CATALOG" and Ahmet Ögüt's "Exploded City". Both projects reveal the possibility for diverse memory formations or diverse narratives, conceivable through lapses.??The project is acco ...
 
Maria W. Stewart was America's first black woman political writer. Between 1831 and 1833, she gave four speeches on the topics of slavery and women's rights. Meditations From The Pen of Mrs. Maria W. Stewart—published in 1879, shortly before her death—is a collection of those speeches as well as her memoir, some meditations and prayers. They are political, poetical and sermon all at the same time; but in the mileu in which she lectured, they were a critically important part of the abolitioni ...
 
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Crosstalk is a two-part series of compiled conversations between City Arts & Lectures guests from the previous three years discussing literary identity and the sometimes pleasurable, sometimes painful, act of writing. Guests include Ocean Vuong, Zadie Smith, Marlon James, Ottessa Moshfegh, Tommy Orange, Eileen Myles, Rebecca Solnit, and Ta-Nehisi C…
 
From surrealism and science fiction to inspiration drawn from historic objects in stately homes and the painting of Francis Bacon: Shahidha Bari hosts a conversation with Will Harris, who has written long-form poems; new Fellows of the Royal Society of Literature Max Porter and Chloe Aridjis, who have written poetic novels which play with form; and…
 
Contributor(s): Dr Kitty Stewart | A campaign by the Manchester United footballer, Marcus Rashford, has prompted the UK government to provide extra support for children from low-income families during the pandemic. Even before coronavirus, child poverty had been rising for several years. This latest bite-sized episode of LSE iQ explores the questio…
 
Contributor(s): Professor Rohini Pande | Join us for the annual Coase-Phillips Lecture which this year will be delivered by Rohini Pande.Even before COVID-19 changed the trajectory of global poverty reduction, the returns to economic growth were increasingly unequally divided in developing economies. Based on lessons from India’s myriad social prot…
 
April 1916. By the Nile, the foremost poets of the Middle East are arguing about Shakespeare. In 2004, Egyptian singer Essam Karika released his urban song Oh Romeo.Reflecting on his travels and encounters around the Arab world, New Generation Thinker Islam Issa, from Birmingham City University, discusses how canonical English writers (Shakespeare …
 
From Tudor courts to plantations to the Arab Spring and modern political philosophy: a debate in partnership with Bristol Festival of Ideas hosted by Shahidha Bari.Jeffrey Howard is an Associate Professor of Political Theory at University College London. He writes and teaches about the moral obligations of democratic citizens and political leaders,…
 
The colourful life of Arthur MacMurrough Kavanagh overturns everything we think we know about disabled people’s lives in the 19th century. Born without hands and feet, he was an adventurous traveller and a Member of Parliament, a tiger-hunting landowner whose attempts to resist the rising tide of Irish nationalism were ultimately defeated, and whos…
 
Contributor(s): Baroness Tyler, Lord O'Donnell, Professor Lord Layard, Alan Jope | This 30th Anniversary CEP event will ask can wellbeing become the focus for social science? How would this change economics and policy analysis? How would it change policy priorities for a post-Covid-19 world?Alan Jope (@alanjope) was appointed CEO of Unilever in 201…
 
Corin Throsby looks at the extraordinary fan mail received by the poet Lord Byron. The New Generation Thinkers scheme is ten years old in 2020. Jointly run by BBC and the Arts and Humanities Research Council, each year it offers ten academics at the start of their careers a chance to bring fascinating research to a wider public. This week we hear f…
 
Contributor(s): Professor Stephanie J. Rickard, Professor Barry Eichengreen | Explanations for variants of populism are typically framed as a contest between culture and economics. Building on his recent book, The Populist Temptation, Professor Barry Eichengreen (University of California-Berkeley) will consider the arguments for both. Utilising dat…
 
Would you don a diving suit or take a drug in a quest to understand the life of someone else? "Following in the footsteps" is an obsession for biographers as they travel the world to bring their subjects to life, sometimes with dangerous consequences.Hull University Professor of Creative Writing Martin Goodman, biographer of the sorcerer Carlos Cas…
 
Contributor(s): Ginette Azcona, Dr Roopa Dhatt, Dr Roopa Dhatt, Megan O’Donnell | This event brings together global experts on gender issues to discuss the urgent need to support women. How can women’s vulnerability be considered in pandemic preparedness and response? And what is the role of the policymaker in reestablishing the path to a more equa…
 
Our guests are a chef and a scientist who are tackling climate change through creating sustainable food. Pat Brown is a biochemist and founder of Impossible Foods, a company at the forefront of making nutritious meat and dairy products from plants to satisfy meat lovers and address the environmental impact of animal farming. Traci Des Jardins is th…
 
Democracy, Hong Kong and USAFree ThinkingHong Kong has seen elections postponed, pro-democracy protesters arrested and a sweeping new national security law imposed by Beijing this year outlawing sedition and subversion. Rana Mitter asks whether Hong Kong can retain its unique identity and how the city's culture can help us make sense of these turbu…
 
Contributor(s): Professor Michael Tomasello | Humans are biologically adapted for cultural life in ways that other primates are not. Humans have unique motivations and cognitive skills for sharing emotions, experience and actions, whereas our nearest primate relatives do not.Michael Tomasello, Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke Univer…
 
Teaching writing - mentors Helen Mort and Blake Morrison compare notes. Plus as Georges Perec's memoir I Remember is published in English for the first time, we look at the rules of writing proposed by the Oulipo group which was founded in 1960 by Raymond Queneau and François Le Lionnais. Georges Perec (1936 – 1982) came up with a "story-making mac…
 
Melting glaciers, cacophonous refugee camps, voices in heads, bathroom altercations and indigenous communities in crisis are the subjects of this year's AHRC Research In Film Awards.Eleanor Rosamund Barraclough talks to researchers and filmmakers from the winning films, which are:Inspiration Award: ‘To Be A Marma’ - Ed OwlesBest Doctoral of Early C…
 
Contributor(s): Professor Vivien Schmidt | In this lecture, Vivien Schmidt will define democracy and legitimacy, discuss it's split-level nature in the EU and detail the processes of Eurozone governance that led to deteriorating economic performance and the rise of populism.Europe’s crisis of legitimacy stems from the European Union’s ‘governing by…
 
Contributor(s): Dr Panayiota Vassilopoulou, Ellie Robson, Dr Gregory McElwain | We celebrate the thought of Mary Midgley, whose writing ranges across animal ethics, religion, science, and the natural world, connecting philosophical thought to lived experience.A fierce opponent of the over-reach of science and a lifelong advocate of the humanities, …
 
Contributor(s): Stephen A Schwarzman, Professor Andrés Velasco | Minouche Shafik talks with financier and philanthropist, Stephen A. Schwarzman, author of the new book What It Takes: Lessons in the Pursuit of Excellence, which draws on his experiences in business, philanthropy, and public service.Stephen A. Schwarzman is Chairman, CEO and Co-Founde…
 
Our guest is chef and author Yotam Ottolenghi, whose best-selling cookbooks have earned him a cult following among home chefs around the world. Born in Israel, Ottolenghi now lives in London where he operates six restaurants and delis. On October 15, 2020, Ottolenghi spoke to Isabel Duffy from his test kitchen in London. The two discussed his lates…
 
Would you change your nose if you could? What about an entire face transplant? Des Fitzgerald speaks to researchers investigating the past and future of facial difference and medical intervention and looks at videos from participants in the AboutFace project, which are being launched as part of the Being Human Festival this November.Emily Cock, fro…
 
What connects a "double elephant" sized map, an academy of dissenters and Daniel Defoe? Shahidha Bari makes a virtual visit to the University of Derby's hub for the Being Human Festival 2020. Today the East Midlands city of Derby is often overlooked, but it was one of the powerhouses of the industrial revolution. Historians and archivists have been…
 
Contributor(s): Anthony Gardner, Beatrice Kilroy-Nolan, Luisa Santos | As the UK steers its post-Brexit future, it is placed between US and EU trade policies. What might these mean for the UK’s economic future? With multilateralism under threat, what are the implications for a ‘Global Britain’ strategy? Can the UK balance its US and EU interests or…
 
Contributor(s): Professor Amina Mama, Dr Siphokazi Magadla | The coronavirus pandemic has magnified existing inequalities, particularly along lines of gender. In Africa, like in other regions around the world, containment measures including lockdowns, confinement and drastic reductions in sociability have significantly impacted women. Access to pai…
 
What does it mean to make art to commemorate histories of conflict? Anne McElvoy's guests are artists Es Devlin and Machiko Weston, Art Fund director Jenny Waldman, chair of the Fourth Plinth Commissioning Group Ekow Eshun and Paris Agar from the IWM as Radio 3 joins with the Imperial War Museum for the 2020 Remembrance Debate.Es Devlin and Machiko…
 
Contributor(s): Jennifer Epps-Addison, Professor Jeff Manza | What do the results tell us about the changing bases of voting behaviour and what do they mean for the left in the US and beyond?Jennifer Epps-Addison (@jeppsaddison) serves as the President and Co-Executive Director of the Center for Popular Democracy and CPD Action's network of partner…
 
Contributor(s): Professor Odd Arne Westad | For most of the past five millennia, the world has been dominated by empires. These mega-states have set the agenda for much of human development, but their rule has never been uncontested. Anti-imperialism is as old as empires. Economic change and devastating wars have weakened some states and promoted o…
 
Matthew Sweet and guests discuss the history and ideas behind the charity shop, our relationship with 'stuff', and musical typewriters - aspects of November's Being Human Festival.Matthew talks to researchers whose work is featured in the festival, which showcases research from a series of UK universities. His guests are anthropologist and soprano …
 
Contributor(s): Effie Bitrou, Dr Charalambos Tsekeris, Professor Calliope Spanou | The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted further – and indeed raised critically – the importance of digital connectivity and digital literacy for economic and societal resilience. From enabling teleworking during times of lock-downs to facilitating social contact with v…
 
Contributor(s): Ilham Gassar, Khalif Abdirahman, Dr Nisar Majid, Mark Bradbury | Galkaio town represents a boundary on the ground and in the imagination within Somali society. The 1993 Peace Accord held a fragile peace for many years as political and developmental trajectories differed markedly on either side of this border town. This talk explores…
 
Contributor(s): Professor Anne-Marie Slaughter, Professor Naomi Oreskes, Professor Lord Stern, Laurence Tubiana | Taking place one week after the election, this panel assesses the outcome of the US election and the prospects for the future of American and international climate policy.The outcome of the 2020 US Presidential Election could have a las…
 
This week, we’re broadcasting a conversation with Alicia Garza and Megan Rapinoe, recorded four days before the presidential election. Alicia Garza is an activist and writer. In 2013, she posted a Facebook response to the murder of Trayvon Martin in which she used the hashtag “Black Lives Matter”, and it sparked a major social movement. Garza has n…
 
Contributor(s): Professor Meena Bose, Dr David Smith, Professor Jeffrey Tulis, Professor Linda Yueh | Will President Trump be able to win a second term in the White House? Or will former Vice President, Democrat Joe Biden be able to beat the incumbent? Join us for a lively evening of discussion with academic experts on US politics who will review t…
 
This November sees the 25th anniversary of the UK Disability Discrimination Act. As we consider what contemporary progress has been made we'll uncover the long history of disabled people’s political activism, look back at the treatment of disabled people in Royal Courts and at fictional portrayals of disability in 19th-century novels from Dickens a…
 
Contributor(s): Professor Nick Chater, Professor Paul Dolan, Dr Grace Lordan, Professor Tali Sharot, Rory Sutherland | The impacts of COVID-19 on society post-COVID and how we deal with them hinge on how politicians, firms and the public respond. What valuable lessons can we learn from behavioural science in a post-COVID-19 world? These unique insi…
 
Contributor(s): James O’Brien | Join us for this event with LSE alumnus and writer and broadcaster James O’Brien who will talking about his new book, How Not To Be Wrong.In How Not To Be Wrong, James puts himself under the microscope, laying open his personal beliefs and opinions on everything from racial prejudice to showing emotions, from fat-sha…
 
From East Africa to Arabia, the First World War to Mozambique, Rana Mitter discusses the impact of war on society and culture. Margaret MacMillan's most recent book is called War: How Conflict Shaped Us and takes a deep dive into the history of conflict. Rob Johnson considers what we gain by exploring the overlooked side of Lawrence of Arabia - his…
 
Contributor(s): Professor David Graeber | This episode is dedicated to David Graeber, LSE professor of Anthropology, who died unexpectedly in September this year. David was a public intellectual, a best-selling author, an influential activist and anarchist.He took aim at the pointless bureaucracy of modern life, memorably coining the term ‘bullshit…
 
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