show episodes
 
The Choir Director Corner Podcast is dedicated to providing choir directors with practical resources to utilize in their teaching. Matt Walker, the creator of The Choir Director Corner, reveals the teaching strategies, methods, and workflows that he has used in building a successful choral program. Discover tips and strategies that will help you save time amidst your busy schedule, run more productive, engaging and efficient rehearsals, and help you tackle your biggest teaching challenges.
 
The most entertaining and enraging stories from mythology told casually, contemporarily, and (let's be honest) sarcastically. Greek and Roman gods did some pretty weird (and awful) things. Liv focuses on Greek and Roman mythology's (mis)treatment of women, the wild things the gods did, and the all around incredible minds of the ancient world. Gods, goddesses, heroes, monsters, and everything in between. Regular episodes every Tuesday, conversations with authors and scholars or readings of an ...
 
Loading …
show series
 
In Episode 78 of the podcast, I'm excited to share with you my conversation with composer Tim Takach! We cover a lot of ground in our conversation, talking about his time with the group Cantus, his growth and development as a composer, and his compositional process. Tim is a wonderful storyteller, which happens to be one of the main objectives of h…
 
It's that time again... SPOOKY SEASON! This episode celebrates FIVE YEARS OF SPOOKY! With clips and stories from all of my past Halloween episodes, and there have been a lot of them. Fresh new Spooky Season episodes coming the rest of the month. Listen to all of the past Spooky Season episodes in this Spotify playlist. CW/TW: far too many Greek myt…
 
Liv reads Ovid's Metamorphoses (!!!), translated by Bookes More. In the first half of Book II, we hear the story of Phaethon's tragic experience driving the chariot of the sun. CW/TW: Much of this work includes stories of gods assaulting women and nymphs, some of these stories can be particularly troubling. Listen with caution. This is not a standa…
 
It's finally time to look closely at the god of war and gore, Ares, and all the ways he was actually kind of cool. Listen to past episodes on Aphrodite (Apple or Spotify) and Hephaestus (Apple or Spotify) for more on Ares' relationship with the goddess of love. Become a Patron of LTAMB here. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it…
 
Over the years, I've used a number of software programs for tasks involved with music composition. A while back a friend recommended MuseScore, and after trying it out, I've added it to the list of tools that I use on a regular basis. Recently I discovered a new function inside of MuseScore that to me was a game-changer, making MuseScore my "go-to"…
 
Liv is joined by Eva Rummery to talk all things plants in Greek myth and even some archaeology. Plant myths, sacred groves, and even how some plants were grown in the ancient world! Follow Eva on Twitter. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I wou…
 
Ever heard of the time two twin child-giant sons of Poseidon tried to conquer Mount Olympus? Now you have! Become a Patron of the podcast for access to lots of bonus content here. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing …
 
When my kids were little, they used to talk about how "stations" was one of their favorite parts of the school day, because they got to do lots of different things! Which got me thinking--how could we use stations in a choir rehearsal? In Episode 76 of the podcast, I discuss exactly that--situations when stations might be a useful rehearsal strateg…
 
Liv reads Ovid's Metamorphoses (!!!), translated by Bookes More. In the second half of Book I, we get the stories of Apollo and Daphne, Jupiter (Zeus) and Io, and an introduction to Phaethon. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's a reading of an ancient source, audiobook style. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv R…
 
In this final episode on the Orphic tradition we look at some weird and wild alternate theogonies, the so-called Orphic gold tablets, and the Orphic hymns. Yes, it's a lot. CW/TW: **this episode includes particularly egregious assault and incest, even for Greek myth** Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as defer…
 
You know what I don't talk enough about? The ruins of Pompeii. Author Elodie Harper joins me to talk ancient Pompeii and writing the lives of enslaved people living in ancient Rome. It's a dark topic, but we have fun (I promise). Find Elodie's two novels, The Wolf Den and The House With the Golden Door wherever you get books. Follow Elodie on Twitt…
 
Zagreus, Zagreus, Zagreus. What a mess of a story. It's gross, it's weird, it's both an afterthought and supremely important. Welcome to the story of thrice born Dionysus, better known as Zagreus. CW/TW: **this episode includes particularly egregious assault and incest, even for Greek myth** far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fict…
 
In Episode 75 of the podcast, I’m very excited to share my conversation with Dr. Emily Williams Burch! Emily is a fantastic music educator who has taken a unique path in carving out a career in choral music education. In our conversation she talks about her journey and all of her experiences that led her to where she is today. You’ll hear about her…
 
Turns out epiphanies are super fascinating and, basically, everywhere. Gillian Glass joins Liv to talk about epiphanic experiences in antiquity, both Greek mythology and in the Torah. Plus, what do the gods smell like, anyway? Follow Gillian on Twitter. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods…
 
What on Gaia's earth is the Orphic tradition? Liv attempts to break down this mysterious tradition that may or may not have been more of an ancient religion. And it all revolves around that famous Thracian singer, Orpheus. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as de…
 
In Episode 74 of the podcast, I’m very excited to share my conversation with composer Katerina Gimon. I found her music while doing a repertoire search a couple of years ago, and I just fell in love with her work. Her music is so interesting and so creative--she gives singers and conductors the opportunity to explore choral music in some very uniqu…
 
Liv reads Ovid's Metamorphoses (!!!), translated by Bookes More. The beginning of everything, according to Ovid's very Roman (and Ovidian!) take on Greek mythological tradition. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's a reading of an ancient source, audiobook style. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads..." in th…
 
Orpheus and Eurydice are famous for their doomed love story, but it turns out Orpheus is also famous for, well, inventing an entire religion separate from the traditional ancient Greek mythology and practices?! CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as…
 
It’s so important to get the choir year started off with productive, effective rehearsals. There’s always a lot to do, and that’s especially true at the beginning of the year. It’s imperative that we take advantage of every single minute of rehearsal. Not only will that help us get everything done, but that also sets the expectation for the rest of…
 
Liv speaks with CW Marshall, who's literally written the book on Euripides' Helen, about the background, context, and behind the scenes of the play as well as Euripides' fragmentary play Andromeda. Follow Toph on Twitter. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as def…
 
Just a quick reading of the first two choral odes from Euripides' Helen, translated by EP Coleridge. They're very good and don't fit in with the full narrative episode. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's a reading of an ancient source, audiobook style. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads..." in the title! …
 
In this very Euripidean finale, Helen and Menelaus execute their escape from Egypt, and Theoclymenus is visited by unexpectedly divine guests... CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: The Greek …
 
Liv speaks with author Cait Corrain about retelling and adapting Greek myths, both in space and on earth. Follow Cait for updates on Crown of Starlight, Dionysus and Ariadne in space, follow on Twitter and Instagram. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferent…
 
Euripides is really here making us all fall for Menelaus and I don't know how to deal with it. Menelaus and Helen are reunited and plan their escape from Egypt. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sou…
 
When I talk with other choir directors, one of the topics that always seems to come up is setting rehearsal expectations–choir directors want to know what expectations I have for my choirs, how I set rehearsal expectations, and what the logistics of my rehearsals look like. And our conversations often turn to issues with classroom management. In my…
 
A re-airing of Liv's reading of Ovid's Heroides, Paris to Helen and Helen to Paris. Ovid's Heroides are fictional letters between mythological figures... These two are particularly incredible (and in the case of Paris, hilarious). Ovid's Heroides, translated by Grant Showerman. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's simply a bonus rea…
 
Things aren't looking good for Helen in Egypt, but then Menelaus rolls in and... makes things more difficult. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'm not as deferential as I would be were I referencing the real thing. Sources: The Greek Plays edited by Mary Lefkowitz and …
 
One of the biggest challenges we have as choir directors is time management. We have so many duties, so many responsibilities, so many irons in the fire...it's a full-time job just keeping track of everything! I recently came across the work of Rory Vaden, who became widely known a few years ago with a TED talk on how to "Multiply Our Time". While …
 
We're going back to Plato and his Timaeus with Kaitlyn Boulding and it's absolutely fascinating. More context on Plato's work, on his story of Atlantis, and even how he connects with and mimics Hesiod. Follow Kaitlyn on Twitter here. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves gods and/or monsters, I'…
 
What if Helen of Sparta was never taken by Paris, never brought to Troy at all? Euripides' Helen explores a "ghost theory" of Helen, an eidolon theory. Check out the podcast's curated Spotify playlists or visit the (in progress) categorized stories on mythsbaby.com. CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically …
 
For the fifth anniversary of the podcast, Liv revisits moments from past conversation episodes. They're so fun! We learn so much! KNOWLEDGE! Find all of Liv's past conversation episodes on mythsbaby.com or in this Spotify playlist! (The playlist is more complete... the website is missing many) CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given …
 
On this special FIVE YEAR ANNIVERSARY EPISODE (!!!) Liv looks back on some of her favourite moments, episodes, and quotes from the last five years of Let's Talk About Myths, Baby! (Plus she tells you all how thankful she is to have you as listeners.) Listen to the full episodes clipped in this episode on this Spotify playlist! CW/TW: far too many G…
 
When I talk with choir directors about planning and preparing for the new year, before we get into anything else, we start by talking about setting goals. In Part 1 of my "Back to School" Podcast Series, I talk about five reasons why you should be setting goals, as well as best practices that we should use when setting our own goals. What are your …
 
Liv reads Ovid's Heroides, the letters from Penelope to Ulysses (Odysseus) and Dido to Aeneas, translated by Grant Showerman. Penelope questions where on Gaia's green earth her husband Ulysses has been all this time, and Dido calls Aeneas out for being such an absolute dweeb. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's a reading of an anci…
 
That's right, we're returning to the story of Theseus because there is still more to that oh-so-problematic man! The myths of Theseus are uniquely Athenian, means of tying mythological heroes with Athenian might and the larger mythological history of Homeric tradition. (Begs the question, why did they have stories of him being quite so messy?!) CW/…
 
Liv speaks with Justin Lorenzo Biggi who studies Athenian citizenship, autochthony, and how both intersect with disability in ancient Athens. It turns out Autochthony isn't just about being born of the snakey-legged early peoples of Athenian mythology... CW/TW: far too many Greek myths involve assault. Given it's fiction, and typically involves god…
 
Liv reads Lucian's True History, translated by Francis Hickes. In a satirical novel of epic proportions, on the Island of the Blessed Lucian meets (and gossips about) all the most famous men of myth and history. Then, who's in Tartarus anyway? This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's a reading of an ancient source, audiobook style. For …
 
A re-airing of Liv's conversation with Kyle Lewis Jordan about the complexities of Hephaestus, both in relation to his impairment and as a god of creation and so much else, in addition to scholarship of disability in the ancient world more broadly. Find part two of the conversation here, and my episode on Hephaestus as a god and his mythology here.…
 
Liv reads Lucian's True History, translated by Francis Hickes. In a satirical novel of epic proportions, Lucian and his companions get eaten by a whale, fight a war inside, before they eventually land on the island of the blessed... This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's a reading of an ancient source, audiobook style. For regular epi…
 
I had the chance to hear several different choirs this past spring, and heard some wonderful performances. Along with my own choir performances, singing and directing, I collected several great ideas this spring for programming for your choirs. And in today's episode of the podcast, I'm sharing them with you! They are definitely pieces to keep on y…
 
Liv reads Ovid's Heroides, letters from Leander to Hero and Hero to Leander, translated by Grant Showerman. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's a reading of an ancient source, audiobook style. For regular episodes look for any that don't have "Liv Reads..." in the title! Attributions and licensing information for music used in the …
 
Liv reads Lucian's True History, translated by Francis Hickes. In a satirical novel of epic proportions, Lucian invents a world featuring rivers of wine and trips (and resulting wars!) to the moon and the sun. This is not a standard narrative story episode, it's a reading of an ancient source, audiobook style. For regular episodes look for any that…
 
Liv speaks with Professor Karen Carr about stories of Hero and Leander, and ancient swimming practices across the world. Stories that speak to how different cultures through history saw the act of swimming and what it meant. Follow Karen Carr on Twitter for more, and pick up a copy of her new book Shifting Currents: A World History of Swimming, ava…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login