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Cedille is a not-for-profit record label dedicated to extraordinary classical music and the brilliant artists who create it. We enhance the world's catalog of recorded music through audiophile-quality recordings featuring Chicago's finest musicians. Each episode of Cedille's Classical Chicago Podcast highlights a new release and feature interviews with your favorite Cedille artists. To support Cedille and its mission, please visit CedilleRecords.org
 
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On this episode of Classical Chicago, Cedille President Jim Ginsburg talks with the Dover Quartet's Joel Link about the chamber group's album "Beethoven Complete String Quartets: Volume 3 — The Late Quartets." This triple-CD release comprises Beethoven’s very last compositions — remarkable and often daunting works that upended the concept of the st…
 
On this episode of Classical Chicago, Cedille President Jim Ginsburg talks with violinist Rachel Barton Pine about Violin Concertos by Black Composers Through the Centuries: 25th anniversary edition. The album features Pine's new recording of Florence Price's Violin Concerto No. 2, with the Royal Scottish National Orchestra & Jonathon Heyward, and …
 
I discuss the idea of statically typed region-based memory management, proposed by Tofte and Talpin. The idea is to allow programmers to declare explicitly the region from which to satisfy individual allocation requests. Regions are created in a statically scoped way, so that after execution leaves the body of the region-creation construct, the ent…
 
In this episode, I start a new chapter (we are up to Chapter 16, here), about verifying safe manual management of memory. I have personally gotten pretty interested in this topic, having seen through some simple experiments with Haskell how much time can go into garbage collection for seemingly simple benchmarks. I also talk about why verifying mem…
 
I discuss a book edited by Freek Wiedijk (pronounced "Frake Weedike"), which describes the solutions he received in response to a call for formalized proofs of the irrationality of the square root of 2. The book was published in 2006, and made an impression on me then. The provers we have discussed so far all have a solution in the book, except for…
 
In this episode, I outline the argument for why the proof-theoretic ordinal (in the sense of Rathjen, as presented last episode) is epsilon-0. My explanation has something of a hole, in explaining how one would go about deriving induction for ordinals strictly less than epsilon-0 in Peano Arithmetic. To help paper over this hole a little, I discuss…
 
Ordinal analysis seeks to determine the strength of a logical theory by assigning an ordinal to it. Which one? In this episode I describe a definition of the proof-theoretic ordinal of a logical theory from a paper by proof theorist Michael Rathjen. It is basically a measure of how strong an induction principle is derivable in the theory. (The firs…
 
Ordinal analysis is an important branch of proof theory, which seeks to compare, quantitatively, the strengths of different proof systems. The quantities in question are ordinals, which extend the ordering character of natural numbers into the infinite. In this episode, I discuss these ideas a bit further, and also review a little the ordinals up t…
 
We saw in the last few episodes that proofs in natural deduction can be simplified by removing detours, which occur when an introduction inference is immediately followed by an elimination inference on the introduced formula. What corresponds to this for sequent calculus proofs? The answer is cut elimination. This episode describes the cut rule and…
 
Sequent calculus is a different style in which proof systems can be formulated, where for each connective, we have a left rule for introducing it (in the conclusion of the rule) in the left part of a sequent G => D (i.e., in G), and similarly a right rule for introducing it in the right part (D). The beauty of sequent calculus is disjunction is han…
 
This episode begins the discussion of the style of proof known as Natural Deduction, invented by Gerhard Gentzen, a student of Hermann Weyl, himself a student of David Hilbert (sorry, I said incorrectly that Gentzen was Hilbert's own student). Each logical connective (like OR, AND, IMPLIES, etc.) has introduction rules that let you prove formulas b…
 
We continue our gradual entry into proof theory by talking about reflecting meta-logical reasoning into logical rules, and naming the three basic proof systems (Hilbert-style, natural deduction, and sequent calculus). Advertising for the October 3-session Zoom mini-course on normalization continues. Email me if you are interested! This is just for …
 
I highlight two basic points in this continuing warm-up to proof theory: there are different proof systems for the same logics, and it is customary to separate purely logical rules (dealing with propositional connectives and quantifiers, for example) from rules or axioms for some particular domain (like axioms about arithmetic, or whatever domain i…
 
Analogously to the decomposition of a datatype into a functor (which can be built from other functors to assemble a bigger language from smaller pieces of languages) and a single expression datatype with a sole constructor that builds an Expr from an F Expr (where F is the functor) -- analogously, a recursion can be decomposed into algebras and a f…
 
Last episode we discussed how functors can describe a single level of a datatype. In this episode, we discuss how to put these functors back together into a datatype, using disjoint unions of functors and a fixed-point datatype. The latter expresses the idea that inductive data is built in any finite number of layers, where each layer is described …
 
This episode continues the discussion of Swierstra's paper "Datatypes à la Carte", explaining how we can decompose a datatype into the application of a fixed-point type constructor and then a functor. The functor itself can be assembled from other functors for pieces of the datatype. This makes modular datatypes possible.…
 
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