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Project Save the World hosts a town hall on the last Sunday of every month. Here we talk about beavers, wind, cooperation with Russian scientists, mental illness and suicide among youths, spirituality and consciousness, and the predicament of Russians who oppose the war but may be conscripted. Guests include Bill Liekam, Peter Wadhams, Franklyn Gri…
 
Prabhat Jha, M.D. is an epidemiology professor at Dalla Lana School of Public Health, U of Toronto. He has been studying the causes of death in India and Africa and notes that the Covid pandemic is far weaker in Africa than the Delta version was in India. WE discuss the changing trends in smoking, breast cancer survival, and suicide. The study in I…
 
Robert Schaeffer is a sociologist who specializes in macro-level global trends – notably globalization. He sees the period of globalization as ending now, and attributes much of the world-wide swing toward right-wing politics to the popular reaction against its economic effects. (He also attributes some of the effect to the consequences of partitio…
 
Reiner Braun is Director of the International Peace Bureau, the oldest world-wide umbrella organization of peace groups in the world. We discuss the speech given the night before by Vladimir Putin, who is holding a referendum to incorporate the occupied territories of Ukraine into Russia, and who has warned that attacks on the Russian homeland (whi…
 
Nicole Redvers was invited to discuss her book about indigenous medicine, The Science of the Sacred, which is described by Amazon: “Modern medical science has finally caught up to what traditional healing systems have known for centuries. Many traditional healing techniques and medicines are often assumed to be archaic, outdated, or unscientific co…
 
Rajagopal and his wife, Jill Carr-Harris, are Gandhian leaders of a civil society organization in India, Ekta Parishad. They have several ashrams where they train uneducated youths to take the initiative in their villages to challenge corrupt practices and hold officials accountable for providing services to the poor. They have led a march across i…
 
Stephen Zunes is professor at the University of San Francisco, where he teaches about strategic nonviolent action. He recounts the invasion of Western Sahara by Morocco after the withdrawal of the Spanish colonial government. Morocco has organized the migration of an overwhelming number of Moroccans into the occupied territory, and this has been su…
 
Rebecca Fannin is a business journalist with several financial magazines. She has published several books about the transformation of India and (especially) China into corporate and technological entrepreneurs. One of her early books was Silicon Dragon, about China. Now, because of Covid's travel restrictions, she has confined her reporting trips t…
 
Mustafa Bahran teaches physics at Carleton University and was formerly Yemen's minister of energy. He notes that the war has been at least paused for six months. The question is whether the Houthis are just collecting weapons for another round of fighting or whether the extended truces will turn into a ceasefire. He discuss the ideology of the Hout…
 
This is one of our regular town halls. Oded Grajew in Sao Paulo tells us about the upcoming election in Brazil. Lula is the better environmentalist. Erika Simpson, Joni Arends and Robin Lloyd speculate about the dynamics behind the failure of the NPT Review Conference to reach a consensus document; Russia was the reason, but was it about the Zaporh…
 
Jefferson Tester is a professor of engineering at Cornell University, where he is establishing a district heating system on campus. Last year he showed the general design, but now he has completed digging a hole three miles deep there. The rocks at the bottom have a temperature of 90 degrees, so cold water poured down there can be pumped back up at…
 
David Demarey is a soil chemist and farmer; Tom Vanacore owns a quarry and makes rock dust; John Sewuster is an expert on seaweed farming; Ted Wysocki is a farmer, and Ryan Brophy is an agronomist. What they have in common is a conviction that mixing rock dust, biochar, and seaweed produces a soil amendment that can not only improve the quality of …
 
Bruce Conn is a professor of One Health at Berry College and and invertebrate biologist with special interests in insects and bivalve mollusks, so we talk about various mosquito-borne diseases and the services provided by oysters and clams to clean sea water. Antibiotics have been used to fatten cattle (apparently it takes a lot of energy for an or…
 
Brian von Herzen is an expert on seaweed. He is creating platforms in the ocean that are farms for kelp. Wave-powered pumps bring nutrients up from the depths to enable the seaweed to thrive, and around them are vast numbers of fish, that come "for the good stuff" the seaweed provides. About a quarter of the plants fall off and sink to the bottom o…
 
Craig Stephen is a public health professor and One Health expert who began as a veterinarian. Nowadays he teaches by telling stories that show the connections between the narrow medical problem and the environment or social circumstances that are involved. Often, he says, by reducing the risks of the undesirable behavior (eg. drug use), we empower …
 
David Matas is a Canadian international lawyer who published an article in the Globe and Mail suggesting a mechanism by which Canada could charge Putin with the crime of aggression and make it dangerous for him to leave Russia for he might be arrested in other countries. First Canada would have to sign the treaty making war aggression an internatio…
 
John Liu was a television producer and cameraman in China when he was asked to make a documentary film about the Chinese government's project to revive the degraded loess plateau – a region that had been the center of a cradle of civilization. A thousand years ago it had become a desert because of the poor animal husbandry, the cutting of the fores…
 
Kehkashan Basu recently attended the Non-Proliferation Conference. James Simeon discussed the new effort to merge a "nexus" of three issues: humanitarianism aid, development, and peace. Unfortunately there can be contradictions in the approaches. Peace issues are about political conflict, and conflicting political or military enemies do not like fo…
 
John Moore was responsible for China's geoengineeing work at a Beijing University. He explains to climatologists Peter Wadhams and Paul Beckwith his proposal to set up underwater panels of unwoven fabric in channels around Antarctica where warm water is flowing under the Thwaite Ice sheet. As a result, the glacier will melt and calve off as iceberg…
 
Amy LeBoeuf's young son contracted Bartellosis from a cat scratch, and her search for medical care led her to found an NGO in Louisiana that educates people about zoonoses – diseases that are transmitted between animals and people. Her search created a friendship with Amanda Elam, the founder and CEO of Galaxy Diagnostics, a company that specialize…
 
Marilou McPhedran is a Canadian senator who recently attended the first meeting of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. We discuss the 77th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Dina Zisserman Brodsky is a Russian Israeli professor who recounts the opinions of Russians toward that atomic bomb. Sam Lanfranco is working o…
 
Michael McFaul, the US Ambassador to Russia during the Obama administration, is now a professor at Stanford who heads an institute that supports democracy movements around the world. They bring activists for training programs where the trainees offer useful advice to the US about the great problems now facing democracy. He doubts that there is any …
 
Peter Wadhams specializes in ice and glaciers. We discuss ways of stopping the runoff of water from Greenland and Antarctica, and of insulating icebergs while towing them to places that need freshwater. We worry about whether Russia will continue to prevent the export of grain from Ukraine, despite having agreed to allow it. Alexey Prokhorenko answ…
 
Maria Puerta Riera is a Venezuelan political scientist living in Florida. Lester Kurtz is a sociologist at George Mason University who has taught several years in Korea. William Geimer is a retired law professor who left the US for Canada because of his disapproval of US wars. They discuss the current dynamics in Asia and the expansion of China int…
 
Dmitri Makarov is the youngest member of the Moscow Helsinki Group's three-person chairmanship, replacing an extraordinary woman, the late Lyudmilla Alexeeva. That group was founded in 1976 by Yuri Orlov and other Russian dissidents, pretending to offer "assistance" to the Soviet government in fulfilling the commitments it had made in the Helsinki …
 
Peter Phillips studies the handful of people who control the global investment money. Harry Glasbeek, a retired law professor, also worries about the control that the corporations have over national governments. James Simeon is focusing primarily on the tragic displacement of people by war, and the use of forced migration as a weapon of war. Simeon…
 
Drs. David Heymann and Ronald St. John are epidemiologists who have worked on various forms of the SARS virus, including Covid 19. Here we discuss GPHIN, the system Dr. St. John developed for monitoring the outbreaks of diseases around the world faster than the WHO could do at the time. Similar techniques are being used now in Sitata, the company t…
 
Whitney Lackenbauer is a professor at Trent University who studies the Canadian North. He is especially enthusiastic about the Rangers who work in their home regions of Canada's Arctic, mainly to provide human security for their local neighbors, but they also support the maintenance of cultural practices, such as the ability to build snow houses: "…
 
Both Both Bruce Flattery and Arthur Edelstein are interested in nonviolence, including especially Gandhi's and Gene Sharp's thinking. Is there any way of applying nonviolence to stop the war in Ukraine? We consider the possibility of Ukrainians' using civilian based defence against an invasion by Russia, along the lines of the resistance by Danes a…
 
Alex Neve was Secretary General of Amnesty International of Canada until a couple of years ago. We discuss the effectiveness of letter-writing campaigns; the question of cultural relativism as a way of evading the duty to defend human rights; and the "enforcement gap" -- the lack of mechanisms for enforcing international laws in general and human r…
 
Mary Olson has been analyzing data from the Hiroshima bombing on the health effects (especially cancer) on survivors who were exposed to ionizing radiation. She has found that for every exposed male who contracts cancer, two exposed woman did so. There are also far greater impacts on infants and small children than on grown-ups. She and physician D…
 
Zviad Adzinbaia is a displaced person from Abkhazia, a region that was part of Georgia until the Russians attacked in two different incidents several years ago. He has studied political science at Tufts University, where he develped a program to monitor and take action against the disinformation campaigns run by Russia. His t-short reads "#suspendK…
 
Sam Lanfranco is an economist now serving on the governance board of the Internet. Reiner Braun is the Secretary General of the International Peace Bureau. We talk about the vulnerabilities in using and becoming dependent on the Internet, but also on the opportunities still available to us too use it for staying in touch with Russians and carrying …
 
Evelin Lindner and Linda Hartling both wrote Ph.D.. dissertations on the subject of humiliation. They see it as a form of domination that, like shame, deeply wounds a person and may be the motivation for a war. Yet shame itself can contribute usefully to society, and it must be invoked as a way of inducing people to behave well. In this conversatio…
 
Stellan Vinthagen is a sociology professor at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, specializing in nonviolent direct action for social change. He notes that civil resistance has not less successful for the past 15 years or so in ousting dictators. This is because organizers of movements have not devoted enough attention to political preparat…
 
Jonathan Granoff and Ward Wilson are experts on nuclear weapons; Joan Kerr specializes in community gardening and IEEE, but they all discuss nukes during this schmooze session. Jonathan and Ward assert that they are the realists, whereas the hard-nosed nuclear weapons strategists are living according to several myths that are manifestly untrue. War…
 
Lori Stahlbrand is a professor at George Brown College. Debbie Field is coordinator for the Coalition for Healthy School Food. Both are deeply concerned about the sustainability of food security. They believe that food should mostly be produced locally, and with reference to the indigenous knowledge of people who have lived in the region for centur…
 
John Manza was Assistant Secretary General for Operations in NATO; Frederic Pearson and Alvina Pearson are retired professors at Wayne State University, and Erika Simpson is a political science professor at Western University. All are knowledgeable about NATO's nuclear strategy. They discuss the new plans arising from this week's NATO summit and ho…
 
Alyn Ware, a Right Livelihood laureate, reports that the laureates as a whole are taking climate change and nuclear weapons to the International Court of Justice and the Human Rights Council. Paul Werbos is troubled by the difficulty of getting advanced technical information about energy production to the people who actually can introduce the real …
 
Nancy Ruth and Lois Wilson have both retired after serving in Canada's senate. Marilou McPhedran is currently serving there. Nancy worked largely on gender-based issues while Lois focused on human rights and now, in retirement, on a United Church network to promote a guaranteed basic income. Marilou had been an educator about human rights issues an…
 
David Harries was educated and worked as a nuclear engineer. Leon Kosals is a sociologist professing criminology at University of Toronto, and James Simeon is head of McLaughlin College, York University. David answers Leon's question about whether nuclear winter is a real possibility (yes, but mainly if there is escalation). They both agree with Ja…
 
Konstanty Gebert is a Polish journalist with a special interest in covering genocide. We discuss the Rwandan and Nazi genocides - the precursors and the circumstances that enabled especially the Germans to become repentant and therefore a moral leader in Europe by accepting over a million refugees. Now Poland is welcoming huge numbers of refugees f…
 
Bruce Kidd was an Olympic athlete who became an academic scholar specializing in kinesiology and sport. He has been president of Scarborough College at the University of Toronto and advises government and sports associations. We talk about the connection between political and sports rivalries and the ethical standards to maintain when disciplining …
 
Dale Dewar and Georgina Bartos discuss Canada' plans to store radioactive wastes near the Ottawa River. Alexey Prokhorenko reports on the state of mind prevailing in Moscow, and Charles Tauber offers to help Russians who need counselling about the war. Leda Raptis tells us about her cancer research and the plight of black male scientists in Canada.…
 
Richard Denton, Barbara Birkett, and Neil Arya are all Canadian physicians who are deeply engaged in International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War Canada and concerned to end the war in Ukraine. The people they know are overwhelmingly in favor of Ukraine, but now worrying that Russia is likely to win the war and keep Ukrainian territor…
 
Before Landon Pearson became a Canadian senator, she had raised five children and lived with her husband Geoffrey Pearson in several countries where he worked in embassies. In Moscow he was Canada's ambassador and, since her children were grown by then, Landon visited schools playgrounds, observing the childrearing practices, then wrote a book, Chi…
 
Liz Carmichael is an Oxford professor who spent the last four days in ceremonies observing Elizabeth's 70 years on the throne. She was moved by it and shared her feelings – though Rachel Small did not see the monarchy the same way, but described them as exploitive of indigenous people, among other bad traits. We talk about the meaning of monarchs a…
 
Budd Hall is a professor of adult education in Victoria BC and co-chair of a UNESCO project on community-based research. Beginning in Tanzania in the 1970s, he helps local citizens discover questions to which they need answers and which are "researchable." Often people in the community collaborate with academic scholars to produce reports that are …
 
Stephen Devereux studies famine. He has developed a scale for assessing the severity of food insecurity and has compared 70 recent historical cases of famine. Many of them are complex situations involving conflict, some actually caused by the political actions of states' policies, as in Afghanistan now sanctions are maintained against the Taliban t…
 
Olivia Ward is a journalist who covered numerous wars, including the Soviet war against Chechnya. Michael Beer works with Nonviolence International, which has developed a list of potentially helpful suggestions for speeding up the end of the war in Ukraine. Much depends upon the communication among Russians and their knowledge of the situation, as …
 
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