show episodes
 
The surprising connections in science and technology that give you the Big Picture. Astronomer Seth Shostak and science journalist Molly Bentley are joined each week by leading researchers, techies, and journalists to provide a smart and humorous take on science. Our regular "Skeptic Check" episodes cast a critical eye on pseudoscience.
 
Space Talk features discussions on a variety of space related topics from SpaceRef and our partners as well as public domain sources such as NASA. Topics include robotic and manned space exploration, space science, space policy, Mars, Astrobiology and everything in between.
 
UNKNOWN — a UFO podcast —is a monthly show led by a team of UFO journalists and researchers who approach the UFO subject with responsible skepticism and the scientific, journalistic attention it deserves. On each episode, they discuss current UFO stories, revisit the history of the modern UFO era, and hang out with special guests as they explore the mysterious and fascinating UFO subject.
 
Indian Genes is committed to bringing in ideas and thoughts from Global leaders in their field to every listener and home, with the intention of providing free and easy access to this information to all that would want to continue their quest for continuous learning. We also are very focused on our young talent that would benefit from this exposure as they plan and move ahead in the careers and life path, hopefully inspiring them to greater heights and clarity in thought that builds both cha ...
 
Ask An Astrobiologist is in interactive talk show sponsored by the NASA Astrobiology Program, SAGANet.org, and the Blue Marble Space Institute of Science. Each episode, our hosts, Dr. Sanjoy Som and Dr. Graham Lau (Blue Marble Space Institute for Science), interview one of the best and brightest scientists from the field of astrobiology, as well as fielding YOUR questions from Twitter, Facebook, and the SAGANet.org chat room. Tweet @saganorg with #AskAstrobio to get your burning questions ab ...
 
This show is a weekly conversation between Tig Notaro and her co-hosts Kyle Dunnigan and David Huntsberger, in which they focus on a central theme they find interesting. The topics range from scientific to philosophical to metaphysical. Looking for the archives? All episodes older than 6 months can be found exclusively on Stitcher Premium, ad-free. Go to stitcher.com/premium and use promo code EARWOLF for 1 month free (and $5 off the annual plan!).
 
SIT'N Listen is a production of Science in the News - a graduate student run organization at Harvard University committed to (1) bridging the communication gap between scientists and the rest of the world and (2) catalyzing discussions between scientists, other experts and enthusiasts. Here at SITN we bring scientists to you! Listen in.
 
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show series
 
How do we find life in a galaxy, or galaxies, far far away while sitting here on Earth? It’s not just by looking through telescopes or sending probes. Those will tell us a few things, but not everything. We need a multi-disciplinary approach. One that combines astronomy, biology, oceonography and chemistry - and that’s just to name a few. Enter Ast…
 
They’re cute and cuddly. But they can also be obnoxious. Science writer Mary Roach has numerous tales about how our animal friends don’t always bow to their human overlords and behave the way we’d want. The resulting encounters, such as when gulls disrupt the Vatican’s Easter mass, make for amusing stories. But others, such as wolves threatening fa…
 
The last month or so has seen several cases of small things being discovered. The first is an asteroid, 2021 27PH, which gets closer to the Sun than Mercury. What could we learn about fundamental science from such an object?The second is one of the smallest exoplanets detected, at less than half the mass of Venus. It orbits very close to its star, …
 
Above the Arctic Circle, much of the land is underlaid by permafrost. But climate change is causing it to thaw. This is not good news for the planet. As the carbon rich ground warms, microbes start to feast… releasing greenhouse gases that will warm the Earth even more. Another possible downside was envisioned by a science-fiction author. Could anc…
 
Jeffrey Hawkins speaks exclusively to Indian Genes, he is the American founder of Palm Computing and Handspring where he invented the PalmPilot and Treo, respectively. He has since turned to work on neuroscience full-time, founding the Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience (formerly the Redwood Neuroscience Institute) in 2002 and Numenta in 2…
 
Without sand, engineering would be stuck in the Middle Ages. Wooden houses would line mud-packed streets, and Silicon Valley would be, well, just a valley. Sand is the building material of modern cities, and we use more of this resource than any other except water and air. Now we’re running out of it. Hear why the Roman recipe for making concrete w…
 
Our guest is Dr. Alfonso Davila, an astrobiologist at NASA Ames Research Center! His research focuses on the biological and biosignature potential of terrestrial environments considered to be analogous to extraterrestrial environments, and using that knowledge to develop strategies to search for evidence of life beyond Earth. His current research i…
 
SMS isn’t the original instant messaging system. Plants can send chemical warnings through their leaves in a fraction of a second. And while we love being in the messaging loop – frenetically refreshing our browsers – we miss out on important conversations that no Twitter feed or inbox can capture. That’s because eavesdropping on the communications…
 
A friend of mine recently poased a question on his podcast about carrion plants. If you don't know what one is, the carrion plant emits an odor that is very similar to rotting flesh.This odor attracts flies which serve to pollinate the flower. The question posed on my friend’s show was how? How does the plant know to do this? For show notes and mor…
 
It was a radical idea a century ago, when Einstein said space and time can be bent, and gravity was really geometry. We hear how his theories inspire young minds even today. At small scales, different rules apply: quantum mechanics and the Standard Model for particles. New experiments suggest that muons – cousins of the electron – may be telling us…
 
They were developed in a matter of months, and they’re 90 percent effective at stopping infection. They protect against serious illness or death. And yet, roughly one-third of Americans refuse to get the Covid vaccine. How can this be? How could something that our ancestors would have considered a miracle be refused by so many? The reasons are many…
 
Richard Bunting works with Rewilding Britain and has over 30 years’ experience campaigning with NGOs such as Amnesty International, UNICEF, WHO, Trees for Life and the UN. Today, Richard discusses this concept of Rewilding, how this conservation method differs from others, and how its reach extends to not only animals and biodiversity, but also bat…
 
Indian Genes talks exclusively to Alfred Mele, Alfred Remen Mele is an American philosopher and the William H. and Lucyle T. Werkmeister Professor of Philosophy at Florida State University. He is also the past Director of the Philosophy and Science of Self-Control Project (2014-2017) and the Big Questions in Free Will Project (2010-2013). Mele is t…
 
In late June an interesting object was discovered heading inwards from the outer solar system, identified in archival images from a survey of the sky. It was initially thought to be worth keeping an eye on over the next decade or so, as it approaches the orbit of Saturn before heading back out to the outer reaches - a chance to keep an eye on a dis…
 
A Twist of Slime Your daily mucus output is most impressive. Teaspoons or measuring cups can’t capture its entire volume. Find out how much your body churns out and why you can’t live without the viscous stuff. But slime in general is remarkable. Whether coating the bellies of slithery creatures, sleeking the surface of aquatic plants, or dripping …
 
New Water Worlds The seas are rising. It’s no longer a rarity to see kayakers paddling through downtown Miami. By century’s end, the oceans could be anywhere from 2 to 6 feet higher, threatening millions of people and property. But humans once knew how to adapt to rising waters. As high water threatens to drown our cities, can we learn do it again.…
 
Rip van Winkle snoozed for 20 years, and Sleeping Beauty for 100. But seeds in an underground bottle have easily beaten both these records, germinating long after the scientist who buried them a few feet underground had died. We investigate biology’s long haulers–from seeds to small creatures–who are able to wake up and restart their lives, even af…
 
When the government announced it would release a report about strange aerial phenomena, public excitement and media coverage took off like a Saturn V rocket. But what’s really in the report? Do we finally have the long-awaited evidence of alien visitation? We discuss the report’s content and implications with both a former U.S. Air Force pilot and …
 
Our understand of the Universe has changed a great deal in the last 100 years. From Einstein's theories of relativity and measurements of the expanding Universe, to the discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background and the mysterious Dark Energy. But what are the current mysteries and unknowns that we still want to uncover? And how much is our progr…
 
The scientific method is tried and true. It has led us to a reliable understanding of things from basic physics to biomedicine. So yes, we can rely on the scientific method. The fallible humans behind the research, not so much. And politicians? Don’t get us started. Remember when one brought a snowball to the Senate floor to “prove” that global war…
 
In the first episode on our Earth and Space Series, we heard a little bit about how research on Earth’s oceans has had major implications for the search for life in the cosmos. Here, we’ve published an extended interview with a pioneer in this area of exploration: Dr. Christopher German. Dr. German is a Senior Scientist who focuses on geochemistry …
 
Our guest is Dr. Heather Graham, organic geochemist and research associate from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Dr. Graham's research focuses on the scientific development of tools and techniques that can help us identify “agnostic biosignatures” – evidence of living systems that may not share common biochemistry with life on Earth. Dr. Graha…
 
Everyone is familiar with the immediate consequences of a pandemic – sickness and death. But the long-term ramifications can be just as dramatic: a breakdown of the family and society, shifts in political power, and widespread appeals to magical thinking. Plagues are societal disrupters. Their effects can linger long after the pathogens have gone. …
 
Episode 26: We’re back with a new episode of Sit’N Listen, this time with the first part of our two part series on Earth & Space. In this episode we will discuss: How learning about our own oceans can teach us about life in spaceThe benefits of space-age technology, a little closer to home.Space as a final frontier or future landfill This episode w…
 
Rachana Reddy talks to Indian Genes on the latest in Satellite technology and development with great insight into the Space industry and what the future holds instore. Rachana has some very valuable information for the private sector and also guides students that may be interested in this field, preparing them for what to expect and what would be e…
 
The toilet: A ubiquitous appliance that dates to the time of Shakespeare. But billions of people around the world still lack modern sanitation infrastructure. And the incentive to modernize includes the possibility that recycling human waste could help with conservation efforts, energy generation, and even medicine. Also, a sixth-grader puts lipsti…
 
On June 8th, Washington Post congressional correspondent Jacqueline Alemany interviewed Luis Elizondo, the individual who administered the Pentagon’s now-defunct UFO project known as the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program. During the interview, Elizondo asserted that China is working to bring the UFO issue to the United Nations. There…
 
What’s the difference between a bird call and the sound of a pile driver? Not much, when you’re close to the loudest bird ever. Find out when it pays to be noisy and when noise can worsen your health. Just about everyone eventually suffers some hearing loss, but that’s not merely aging. It’s an ailment we inflict on ourselves. Hear how a team in Ne…
 
This month, we're joined by two people who've just been elected to prestigious roles in science here in the UK. Professor Mike Edmunds has just become President-elect of the Royal Astronomical Society, while Professor Bernard Schutz has recently been elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.Both these societies have a long history, and we discuss thei…
 
Whether you yawn, gasp, sniff, snore, or sigh, you’re availing yourself of our very special atmosphere. It’s easy to take this invisible chemical cocktail for granted, but it’s not only essential to your existence: it unites you and every other life form on the planet, dead or alive. The next breath you take likely includes molecules exhaled by Jul…
 
Standing on your own two feet isn’t easy. While many animals can momentarily balance on their hind legs, we’re the only critters, besides birds, for whom bipedalism is completely normal. Find out why, even though other animals are faster, we’re champions at getting around. Could it be that our upright stance made us human? Plus, why arches help sti…
 
A current push for government transparency when it comes to UFOs has people clamoring for the U.S. government to disclose what it knows about UFOs. On this episode, Jason McClellan discusses the topic of government transparency, government UFO disclosure, and the media frenzy related to the impending UFO report coming from the Director of National …
 
Please join us for a special panel episode all about the OSIRIS-REx mission, which just left asteroid Bennu with asteroidal material on its way back to Earth! This episode's guests are all collaborators on the OSIRIS-REx mission: Drs. Eve Berger, Jason Dworkin, and Scott Sandford.Check out our website for the full transcript of this podcast, plus t…
 
Two heads may be better than one. But what about three or more? A new study shows that chimpanzees excel at complex tasks when they work in groups, and their accumulated knowledge can even be passed from one generation to the next. But group-think also can be maladaptive. When humans rely on knowledge that they assume other people possess, they can…
 
Franck Marchis is a Planetary astronomer at the SETI Institute and the CSO at Unistellar. Franck starts the conversation today with some of the real time stats in the search for other worlds, such as numbers of planets and numbers of stars, that really shine a light on our place in the universe. He also discusses Astronomical research itself, and h…
 
This is the first interview Space Hero has given to any media house in Asia and Indian Genes is really happy to be bringing this to you. If you are a Space enthusiast, an explore or just a curious mind this could be your opportunity to win Televisions biggest Prize..a trip to the International Space Station !! We continue to create history here...a…
 
Pint-Sized Science, Season 2 Episode 5Title:How Our Bodies Respond to Viruses and What Sets SARS-CoV-2 ApartInterviewee: Dr. Sara Cherry, Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Interviewer: Hope Merens, PhD Student in Molecular Biology, Harvard UniversityOver the past year, COVID-19 has affected every aspect of o…
 
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