Asia Institute, The University of Melbourne public
[search 0]
More

Download the App!

show episodes
 
E
Ear to Asia

1
Ear to Asia

Asia Institute, The University of Melbourne

Unsubscribe
Unsubscribe
Monthly
 
Ear to Asia is produced by Asia Institute, the Asia research specialists at the University of Melbourne, Australia. In Ear to Asia, we talk with Asia experts to unpack the issues behind news headlines in a region that is rapidly changing the world. Subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts.
 
Loading …
show series
 
Taiwan and Korea were colonised by Imperial Japan for much of the first half of the 20th century, and liberated only after Japan surrendered to allied forces in 1945. While North and South Korea continue to share a deep resentment towards Japan, Taiwan exhibits a more positive attitude towards their former coloniser. Why is there such a stark diffe…
 
While non-violence and detachment may be central to Buddhist teachings, there are growing accounts of human rights abuses – often along ethnic lines – in Buddhist-majority countries like Myanmar and Sri Lanka, often carried out in the name of Buddhism. So how does Buddhism intersect with political power? And how has Buddhism itself been changed by …
 
China’s meteoric economic rise over the last 40+ years has been accompanied by hundreds of millions of people leaving the countryside to seek opportunities in the nation's metropolises. Housing this immense influx has been and continues to be a challenge for authorities. So how is China meeting the challenges of providing a roof over the heads of 1…
 
The recent change of government in Australia and a less strident tone in messaging from the Chinese leadership are being taken by some as a promising turn for fractured bilateral ties. But as Australia remains caught in the great power rivalry between the United States and China, what kind of relationship can we realistically expect between Canberr…
 
Protesters returned to the streets of Bangkok in late 2021 – after a hiatus due to COVID-19 restrictions – with anger over curbs to civil and political rights as well as calls for reform of the Thai monarchy. In response, Prayut Chan-o-cha’s government has sought to quell the pro-democracy protests by restricting and monitoring internet use, and by…
 
Malaysia has witnessed a succession of prime ministers and political alliances over the past four years in what some observers say is the most serious era of political instability since independence in 1957. Meanwhile, Malaysia’s grand old party, UMNO, dealt an unprecedented defeat in 2018 following a global corruption scandal and mass protests, is…
 
India has now on four occasions abstained from voting in the United Nations to censure Russia over its invasion of Ukraine. New Delhi’s muted response to Moscow’s military offensive may seem mystifying given India’s own experience of armed incursions by China, as well as its membership in the US-led Quadrilateral Security Dialogue (“the Quad”). So …
 
Having built a Shariah-compliant global finance industry now worth US$3 trillion, Islamic legal experts are now grappling with the question of whether cryptocurrencies are permissible for the world’s 1.8 billion Muslims. Just how are religious laws from the 7th century adapted to meet the present-day needs and economic aspirations of believers? How…
 
Pachinko, the New York Times best-selling novel and now major TV series, shines a light on the history and plight of the Zainichi – ethnic Koreans long resident in Japan – and their struggle to make lives for themselves despite persistent discrimination and ethnic stereotyping. Zainichi researchers Drs Jon Glade, Cindi Textor and David Roh join pre…
 
For Japan, China is both its largest trading partner and its greatest strategic threat. And while Tokyo has garnered admiration for how it walks the line between its ally Washington and Beijing, it’s now set to draw up a new defence strategy with China likely top of mind. So what has the Xi Jinping era meant for bilateral ties? And how much of the …
 
The South Korean mega-hit Squid Game is but one example of an ever growing pool of Asian video content riding the boom in streaming services to a global audience. And while translations are key to bridging the language divide, what are the factors that make for a good translation? Will fan-based translation and artificial intelligence make trained …
 
China’s Communist Party is known to prize loyalty and conformity among its more than 90 million members. If good policies are forged through deliberation and debate, how does the CCP handle the weighing of opinions, counter-proposals and objections while ensuring ideological purity? And how does a party member of good will conscientiously object? D…
 
As Australia’s relationship with China continues to sour, it should come as no surprise that Canberra is bolstering security ties with New Delhi. Additionally, the two governments are working hard to forge a comprehensive trade agreement. But is a mutual suspicion of Beijing a sound basis for closer ties? What are the real issues that bind -- and s…
 
As US president, Donald Trump rewrote the rule book for dealing with China, breaking norms enshrined in bilateral relations since the days of Richard Nixon. Yet even Trump’s harshest critics have since warmed to his assertive, unconventional approach to Beijing, and there’s now recognition that there is no return to the China policy of old. But was…
 
Despite being well into his final term as Indonesia’s president, Joko Widodo continues his coalition building, and retains the backing of political and business elites. And, while critics point to poor pandemic management and eroding democracy under his watch, Jokowi remains very popular with ordinary Indonesians. So why is Jokowi still actively am…
 
For many, outgoing Philippines president Rodrigo Duterte will be remembered for his call for the extra-judicial killings of alleged drug dealers. He's also gone after his critics in the media, the judiciary, and the legislature. But despite his apparent excesses, Duterte remains popular with ordinary Filipinos. What's been the basis for his endurin…
 
In Japan, the norms of human connection and physical intimacy are evolving, with arranged marriages on the wane, and defacto relationships and same-sex unions no longer rare. As the nature of unions changes, so is the practice of parting, with increases in late-life and women-initiated divorces. What’s driving these societal changes in Japan? How a…
 
What's at stake and who are the stakeholders in steering health policy in Indonesia? While the right to health for all Indonesians has been embraced by progressive, populist and technocratic political forces in recent years, oligarchic elites with ties to business and the military are now reemerging to thwart further improvements in healthcare for …
 
While relations between China and Australia have been on a protracted downward spiral, with on-the-ground issues continuing to hamper bilateral ties, how much of the impasse is down to a mutually poor grasp of the opposite number? China legal veteran Dr Andrew Godwin and China political scientist Assoc Prof Delia Lin make the case that an appreciat…
 
India has been slipping down the league tables of democratic health recently, with concerns over persistent crackdowns on dissent by the Hindu nationalist-led government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Just how robust is the nation’s democracy? How does India reconcile its membership in coalitions of democracies, such as the Quad, with criticism a…
 
In Japan, slender bodies are prized and body size is regarded as a personal responsibility. Meanwhile, Japan’s government views the trend of increasing average body weight as a public health problem. In this social milieu, how do those with non-conforming body sizes feel about themselves? How is Japan’s conception of body image changing? Gender stu…
 
China’s natural environment has paid a high price for the nation’s economic success. And despite the Chinese government’s aversion to collective action, there are NGOs working hard to save the environment. So how do NGOs operate in this milieu? How much of Beijing’s recent concern for the environment is owed to the actions of civil society? Human g…
 
India’s caste system remains alive and thriving, both in India and in its global diaspora. Seven decades after the passing of laws to fight discrimination, caste continues to dictate who Indians can marry, their prospects for education and jobs, and even where they may live. Caste’s pernicious effects also extend to businesses, from Mumbai to Silic…
 
For Australia, proficiency in the languages of its major Asian trading partners can yield important insights into what makes those societies and economies tick. But does Australia possess the linguistic skills for deep engagement with the region? And what will it take to get more Australians to take up Asian languages? Prof Melissa Crouch and Dr Le…
 
China and Russia are now arguably closer than they've ever been, with rapidly growing military and economic cooperation. Will the strength of these ties herald the end of U.S. hegemony in the Western Pacific? And do the two authoritarian giants share a vision by which they can reshape the world? International relations experts Professor Elizabeth W…
 
Australia is finding itself increasingly torn between its largest trading partner, China, and its long-time ally, the United States. So, what is the value vs the cost of Australia’s alliance with the US? And what will it take to repair relations with China? International strategy expert Professor Michael Wesley examines this geopolitical triangle w…
 
Colonialism has often left diverse and mutually hostile ethnic groups trapped inside a common national border. In Asia, countries like Myanmar and Sri Lanka have played out their unresolved ethnic divisions in prolonged civil unrest and bloodshed. How can ethnically splintered nations find a way forward? Can federalism be utilised to ease conflict …
 
Afghanistan’s Taliban is poised to take the reins in Kabul with the looming withdrawal of US troops. Although dependent on Pakistan in the past, the Taliban are now more geopolitically savvy. So what influence would Islamabad have in a new Taliban-led Afghanistan? And what can the world expect from a Taliban 2.0 government? South Asia observers Ass…
 
While traitors are despised in most societies, the preferred term in China, hànjiān, is not only highly charged but also takes on ethno-centric dimensions. So how has the Chinese concept of the traitor been put to political use by China’s post-dynastic governments? And what is regarded as treasonous behaviour in contemporary China? Dr Craig Smith a…
 
India is the world’s largest donor of COVID-19 vaccines despite having the world’s second highest caseload of coronavirus. What are India’s motivations for this bold move? Will India have enough vaccines for its 1.3+ billion people, and what does India’s apparent generosity say about the vaccine nationalism of the west? Political scientist Dr Prade…
 
How do people at the intersection of LGBTQIA+ and Asian ethnicity fare when migrating to Australia, why do they choose to make their lives here, and what challenges do they face as they seek genuine inclusion? Associate Prof Claire Maree and Dr Jay Song, both of Asia Institute, examine their lived experiences and life challenges. Presented by Ali M…
 
While the majority of the 650,000+ China-born people living in Australia are here permanently, most choose to forgo Australian citizenship. So how do members of Australia’s mainland Chinese community view themselves, and how are they viewed by others -- particularly now that the relationship between Canberra and Beijing is at an ebb? Asia Institute…
 
Although Mandarin is the national language of China, it remains incomprehensible to 20% of the population. Beijing is now pushing the use of Mandarin hard among ethnic minorities, but while fluency in the common tongue brings economic benefits, what is the cost to the native languages and identities of those affected? Dr Lewis Mayo and Dr Gerald Ro…
 
China has been punishing Australia via trade sanctions and social media for actions taken by Australia’s government that Beijing regards as part of a US-led strategy to contain its rise. How is Australia to balance its loyalty to its longtime ally, the United States, with the demands of its biggest economic partner, the ascendant China? Former Aust…
 
While Indonesia’s new, so-called Job Creation Law was sold to the public as essential to boosting employment by reducing red tape, it has sparked continued outrage among workers, trade unionists, environmentalists and religious organisations. What are the concerns over how this omnibus law was passed, and who are the real winners and losers? Indone…
 
Many citizens of Hong Kong fear the recently imposed National Security Law is only the latest move by Beijing to wind back civil liberties promised to last till 2047. But what does China’s growing impatience mean for Hong Kongers? How will these changes affect business in the bustling metropolis? China watchers Dr Sow Keat Tok and Dr Kevin Carrico …
 
The constitutions of both Pakistan and Malaysia enshrine Islam as the state religion while also protecting individuals’ rights to freedom of worship. So how do their seemingly parallel legal systems of common law and Sharia jurisprudence operate when it comes to matters of Muslim identity? Dr Matthew Nelson from Asia Institute and Dr Dian Shah from…
 
India and China have been at odds over their common border for over a century, and this year’s deadly military skirmishes are further dashing hopes of a resolution. So why are there such high stakes over barren terrain high in the Himalayas? What would it take to dissolve the intransigence on both sides? Political scientist Dr Pradeep Taneja and se…
 
Turkey is increasingly intervening militarily in the territories of several of its Middle East neighbours, while relations with other regional players are souring. This is in stark contrast to their “zero problems with neighbouring countries” strategy of only a decade ago. Turkish affairs analysts Dr Tezcan Gümüş and Iain MacGillivray discuss Turke…
 
For Vietnamese hunting economic opportunities abroad, it turns out Russia is a popular choice. Entering on short stay visas and overstaying sometimes for decades, they typically find work in urban market complexes, and in some cases resort to illegal activities to make ends meet. So what draws the Vietnamese to Russia? What are their day-to-day liv…
 
In Asia as elsewhere, whom statues commemorate and whom they overlook comes down to power and politics. And while the early post-colonial period was the heyday of statue building in the newly minted countries of Asia, the practice is alive and well today with ever larger and more expensive statues being erected. Asia historians Dr Ruth Gamble and D…
 
Despite its roots in China, Mao Zedong’s theories of class struggle and violent revolution spread around the globe in the second half of the twentieth century, igniting armed uprisings in its wake. Asia historian Dr Matthew Galway and Latin American cultural studies researcher Dr Carlos Amador examine the appeal and impact of Maoism outside of Chin…
 
In Indonesia, pollution from plastics is reaching crisis levels, with the fabled beaches of Bali now strewn with discarded plastics, while on Java the army is called out to unclog rivers from “icebergs” of plastic. How did Indonesia get into this predicament, and who will clean up the mess? Indonesian rock star and environmental activist Gede Robi,…
 
Despite an initial flirt with pandemic denialism, Turkey may well be able to take some pride in its handling of the Covid-19 crisis. Yet, coronavirus continues to impose a huge cost on a nation already grappling with faltering economic growth, deepening existing political and social divides. With us to examine the myriad impacts of Covid-19 on Turk…
 
Special guest former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd joins host Ali Moore to discuss a post COVID-19 world marked by an increasingly assertive China and anaemic US leadership. Will growing Sino-American tensions result in a new cold war? And what’s the future for the global institutions responsible for maintaining world order? Kevin Rudd is Pr…
 
As the Indonesian government’s coronavirus response has shifted from deep denial to broad action, some of its key directives are meeting with public resistance. So what is the pandemic telling us about political leadership, and about existing fault lines in Indonesian society? Long time Indonesia watchers Prof Tim Lindsey and Dr Ian Wilson join hos…
 
Indonesian President Joko Widodo is forging ahead with his grand plans to replace Jakarta with a new capital on the island of Borneo, but beyond the upbeat political rhetoric, many questions remain. How open and transparent has the design process been? Have the needs of the local people been considered? Who will be the real winners in this immensel…
 
India has been making the headlines with the world’s biggest nationwide lockdown to stem the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Epidemiology aside, what is the pandemic revealing about the social, political and economic fault lines already existing in India? Health policy specialist Dr Azad Bali and political scientist Dr Pradeep Taneja join host Ali …
 
Although the Kurds form a very sizable minority in Turkey, there is little tolerance for those who stray from the dominant Turkish nationalist narrative. So how have the Kurdish people navigated Turkey’s political environment in the hopes of achieving their aspirations? Kurdish affairs researcher Dr William Gourlay from Monash University and Asia I…
 
Ambitious construction programs for infrastructure and housing in Asia and elsewhere are leading to skyrocketing use of concrete, of which sand is a key ingredient. Mining of sand, a surprisingly high-stakes enterprise, comes with considerable human and environmental costs. Development researchers Associate Professor Melissa Marschke and Dr Vanessa…
 
Loading …

Quick Reference Guide

Copyright 2022 | Sitemap | Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
Google login Twitter login Classic login