show episodes
 
Did you know that Europeans used to believe that sheep grew from Mongolian trees? Have you heard about the misbegotten discovery of a new form of water in the 1960s that set off a cold war arms race? Ever seen the gleaming Las Vegas hotel that accidentally shoots heat rays at poolside guests? The Constant is an audio history of getting things wrong. From ancient science to contemporary blunders, we take you on journeys of misadventure and misapprehension, filling your brain with juicy nugget ...
 
Thinking back to our history classes growing up, we had one question: Where the ladies at? Enter, Encyclopedia Womannica. In just 5 minutes a day, learn about different incredible women from throughout history. In Wonder Media Network’s brand new podcast, we’re telling the stories of women you may or may not know — but definitely should.
 
Where History Comes Alive! A fast-paced, well-researched weekly podcast covering a wide range of historical events, persons, places, legends, and mysteries, hosted by Jon Hagadorn. 1001 Heroes Podcast is a proud part of the 1001 Stories Podcast Network, which includes 1001 Classic Short Stories & Tales Podcast, 1001 Radio Days, and 1001 Stories For the Road Podcast. The network enjoyed over 5 million listens in the past year from a worldwide audience. SUPPORT OUR SHOW BY BECOMING A PATRON! w ...
 
The Modern Art Notes Podcast is a weekly, hour-long interview program featuring artists, historians, authors, curators and conservators. Pulitzer Prize-winning art critic Sebastian Smee called The MAN Podcast “one of the great archives of the art of our time.” When the US chapter of the International Association of Art Critics gave host Tyler Green one of its inaugural awards for criticism in 2014, it included a special citation for The MAN Podcast.
 
Learning your history makes you - and your people - stronger. As Black people, we know we’re left out of the history books. That the media images are skewed. That we need access to experts, information and ideas so we can advance our people. Black History Year connects you to the history, thinkers, and activists that are left out of the mainstream conversations. You may not agree with everything you hear, but we’re always working toward one goal: uniting for the best interest of Black people ...
 
Jason Weiser tells stories from myths, legends, and folklore that have shaped cultures throughout history. Some, like the stories of Aladdin, King Arthur, and Hercules are stories you think you know, but with surprising origins. Others are stories you might not have heard, but really should. All the stories are sourced from world folklore, but retold for modern ears. These are stories of wizards, knights, Vikings, dragons, princesses, and kings from the time when the world beyond the map was ...
 
The Irregular Warfare Podcast explores an important component of war throughout history. Small wars, drone strikes, special operations forces, counterterrorism, proxies—this podcast covers the full range of topics related to irregular war and features in-depth conversations with guests from the military, academia, and the policy community. The podcast is a collaboration between the Modern War Institute at West Point and Princeton's Empirical Studies of Conflict Project.
 
JD and Beau sit down every week and talk about the rich history and elegance of pipe tobacco, the custom blends found only at the Country Squire, as well as general shop talk. If you’re a pipe enthusiast looking for a show to listen to on the go or while you’re kicking back enjoying a bowl, this is definitely the place for you.
 
Echoes of India is the story of India like you've never heard it before. Host Anirudh Kanisetti takes you on a journey through its wonders, from the Greek art of Afghanistan to the to the thriving ports of Tamil Nadu. Along the way, monks debate, queens boast, and armies roar. From philosophy to politics to economics, the past comes back to life - noisy, breathing, as thriving as the Indian subcontinent is today.
 
Art & Labor chronicles the stories of social justice organizing within the arts. We hope to center the human cost of the “art world” and advocate for fair labor practices for artists, assistants, fabricators, docents, interns, registrars, janitors, writers, editors, curators, guards, performers, and anyone doing work for art & cultural institutions.
 
The podcast that transports you to the ancient world and back, with some good conversation along the way. It's not just about ancient Greece. It's about a huge chunk of human history that the Greek texts give us access to: from Egypt and Babylon, to Persia, to Carthage and Rome, we'll sail the wine-dark sea of history with some expert guides at the helm. Topics will include archaeology, literature, and philosophy. New episode every month.
 
Avery Trufelman explores stories of people who tried to design a better world — and what happens when those designs don’t go according to plan. Season one, Utopian, is about the perpetual search for the perfect place. From Curbed and the Vox Media Podcast Network.
 
From art lovers to art haters to art-is-just-okay-ers, Art History for All aims to get all kinds of people thinking about art and what it means to them. Each episode, Allyson Healey tackles a single work of art and its history and larger significance, always asking the question: so what? Art History for All takes you beyond the art historical canon and helps you find the way in which art speaks to you (even if it's never spoken to you before)
 
History! The most exciting and important things that have ever happened on the planet! Featuring reports from the weird and wonderful places around the world where history has been made and interviews with some of the best historians writing today. Dan also covers some of the major anniversaries as they pass by and explores the deep history behind today's headlines - giving you the context to understand what is going on today.
 
We tell our children unsettling fairy tales to teach them valuable life lessons, but these Cautionary Tales are for the education of the grown ups – and they are all true. Tim Harford (Financial Times, BBC, author of “The Data Detective” and “The Undercover Economist”) brings you stories of awful human error, tragic catastrophes, daring heists and hilarious fiascos. They'll delight you, scare you, but also make you wiser. iHeartMedia is the exclusive podcast partner of Pushkin Industries.
 
Welcome to the Idea to Value podcast, where in every episode we highlight the latest insights into creativity and innovation from experts across the world. I’m your host Nick Skillicorn, I care about the evidence behind what makes ideas happen, and I have already helped thousands of people like you through my unique insights into recent scientific findings of how creativity works. I also show you how to turbocharge innovation programmes so they can finally deliver on the value and ideas you’ ...
 
I Like Your Work supports artists! Each week artist Erika b Hess interviews artists, gallerists, collectors, and curators to cover topics that will help you in your art practice! From inspiring interviews from the lives of artists to business practices you will walk away ready to get in the studio!
 
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show series
 
A rare Renaissance shield, which was originally stolen by the Nazis from Konopiště Castle during the Second World War, is now being returned to the Czech Republic by the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Representatives of both the museum and Czech institutions signed an agreement earlier this week, ending a several-year verification process.…
 
As the Nazi war machine rampaged across Europe it did not just take territory and resources from its conquests but also many thousands of pieces of art and other antiquities. Stolen from both galleries and individual victims of Nazi crimes allied troops discovered hidden caches of priceless artworks throughout Europe. As the war had proceeded it ha…
 
Journalist and author Charlie English shares the story of a remarkable collection of artworks by psychiatric patients in Weimar Germany and also explores the devastating impact of Nazism on modernist art and people with mental illnesses. (Ad) Charlie English is the author of The Gallery of Miracles and Madness: Insanity, Art and Hitler’s first Mass…
 
With memories of Sept. 11, 2001 fading for some, and images of that day unknown to a younger generation, the Smithsonian Institution is working at piecing together history object by object. William Brangham takes a behind-the-scenes look as part of our arts and culture series, "CANVAS." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/ab…
 
In The Life and Times of Louis Lomax: The Art of Deliberate Disunity (Duke University Press, 2021), Thomas Aiello traces the complicated and fascinating life of a pioneering Black journalist and media personality. A witness to some of the most iconic moments of the 1960s, Lomax remains an important yet overlooked civil rights figure, who emerged as…
 
Internationally recognized artist Amir H. Fallah is known for his vibrant figurative work that draws from western painting vocabulary and turns the history of portraiture on its head. The work explores how one reconstructs identity and asks the question, how do you describe someone without showing their physical likeness? It’s incredibly powerful w…
 
In this episode of The World in Time, Lewis H. Lapham and Philip Hoare discuss Albrecht Dürer’s brilliance, what his art meant to people throughout history, and the centuries-long ubiquity of his woodcut of a rhinoceros—an animal the artist had never seen.Lewis H. Lapham speaks with Philip Hoare, author of “Albert and the Whale: Albrecht Dürer and …
 
Ian Keable describes some of the most audacious, bizarre and inventive pranks that fooled Georgian Britain From a woman who seemingly gave birth to rabbits to a man who claimed he could climb inside a wine bottle, Ian Keable – author of The Century of Deception – describes some of the most audacious, bizarre and inventive pranks that fooled Georgia…
 
Please forgive sound as I'm away from - and between - homes. Recorded from deepest East Berlin. I have long been interested in the factory buildings that dot Dublin - Art Deco gems like Kodak and Player Wills especially - but who worked in them? And what should be done with them? (Pod Thumbnail: Williams and Woods from G&T Crampton Archive, UCD)…
 
This month, we're going back to school with stories of the most influential women educators in history. History classes can get a bad wrap, and sometimes for good reason. When we were students, we couldn’t help wondering... where were all the ladies at? Why were so many incredible stories missing from the typical curriculum? Enter, Encyclopedia Wom…
 
Underlying every great city is a rich and vibrant culture that shapes the texture of life within. In The Speculative City: Art, Real Estate, and the Making of Global Los Angeles (U Minnesota Press, 2021), Susanna Phillips Newbury teases out how art and Los Angeles shaped one another’s evolution. She compellingly articulates how together they transf…
 
Why are white evangelicals the most skeptical major religious group in America regarding climate change? Previous scholarship has pointed to cognitive factors such as conservative politics, anti-science attitudes, aversion to big government, and theology. Drawing on qualitative fieldwork, Robin Veldman's book The Gospel of Climate Skepticism: Why E…
 
Tracing Mead’s career as an ethnographer, as the early voice of public anthropology, and as a public figure, this elegantly written biography links the professional and personal sides of her career. Paul Shankman's Margaret Mead (Berghahn Books, 2021) looks at Mead’s early career through the end of World War II, when she produced her most important…
 
Oklahoma's Black towns aren't just places of the past - they maintain an enduring allure, and look toward the future, argues Karla Slocum in her new book, Black Towns, Black Futures: The Enduring Allure of a Black Place in the American West (UNC Press, 2019). Dr. Slocum, the Thomas Willis Lambeth Chair of Public Policy and a professor of Anthropolo…
 
Tracing Mead’s career as an ethnographer, as the early voice of public anthropology, and as a public figure, this elegantly written biography links the professional and personal sides of her career. Paul Shankman's Margaret Mead (Berghahn Books, 2021) looks at Mead’s early career through the end of World War II, when she produced her most important…
 
The Derveni Papyrus is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Richard Janko, Gerald F. Else Distinguished University Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan. This wide-ranging conversation covers Prof. Janko’s research on the Derveni Papyrus, Europe’s oldest surviving manuscript from the 4th century …
 
The scientists affiliated with the early Royal Society of London have long been regarded as forerunners of modern empiricism, rejecting the symbolic and moral goals of Renaissance natural history in favor of plainly representing the world as it really was. In Aesthetic Science, Alexander Wragge-Morley challenges this interpretation by arguing that …
 
Kristian Petersen’s new edited volume Muslims in the Movies: A Global Anthology (Ilex Foundation and Harvard University Press, 2021), introduces the subject of Muslims and film. The volume contains nineteen chapters that engage a range of film industries, including Hollywood and Bollywood, but also movies from the Philippines, Indonesia, Nigeria, I…
 
The Derveni Papyrus is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Richard Janko, Gerald F. Else Distinguished University Professor of Classical Studies at the University of Michigan. This wide-ranging conversation covers Prof. Janko’s research on the Derveni Papyrus, Europe’s oldest surviving manuscript from the 4th century …
 
Few figures stand as prominently in Marxist theory and history as V.I. Lenin. The revolutionary who played a pivotal role in one of the most important events in world history has received reverence, damnation, and everything in between, but much of that response depends on deep misunderstandings of both what he thought and what he did. This misunde…
 
The scientists affiliated with the early Royal Society of London have long been regarded as forerunners of modern empiricism, rejecting the symbolic and moral goals of Renaissance natural history in favor of plainly representing the world as it really was. In Aesthetic Science, Alexander Wragge-Morley challenges this interpretation by arguing that …
 
Often seen as an outlier in science, Gaia has run a long and varied course since its formulation in the 1970s by atmospheric chemist James Lovelock and microbiologist Lynn Margulis. Gaian Systems: Lynn Margulis, Neocybernetics, and the End of the Anthropocene (U Minnesota Press, 2020) is a pioneering exploration of the dynamic and complex evolution…
 
It's a question that requires tapping into your imagination. A question that forces you to explore the possibilities within freedom. And it's a question we ask every guest on Black History Year. "What does Black liberation look like to you?" In this bonus episode, you'll hear some of the most thought-provoking and inspiring responses to this questi…
 
King Henry VIII was deeply religious and started out as a staunch supporter of the Pope and the Roman Catholic church. But everything changed when Henry's need to produce a male successor led to his wanting to divorce Catherine of Aragon and marry Anne Boleyn. In this first of an occasional series of Explainer podcasts, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb …
 
Art and Labor is joined by members of the union-to-be of Baltimore’s Walters Art Museum, the Walters Workers United! OK and Lucia interview Ruby, Garrett, and Allison (who we unfortunately lost connection with!) about their path towards worker organization- from your standard total mismanagement of COVID in 2020 to toxic fumes passing staff out; de…
 
Riz Ahmed's acting and music careers have always gone hand-in-hand. And in his new film "Mogul Mowgli," which he co-wrote, the two art forms collide, with a story that hits close to home. Amna Nawaz speaks to Ahmed about his upcoming films, increasing Muslim representation in Hollywood and 9/11's lasting impact on Muslims 20 years later. PBS NewsHo…
 
Episode No. 515 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast features curator Betsy Kornhauser and art historian Aaron M. Hyman. Along with Shannon Vittoria, Kornhauser is the co-curator of "Jules Tavernier and the Elem Pomo" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The exhibition examines the cultural interchange within Tavernier's Dance in a Subterranean Roundhouse…
 
Dante Alighieri died 700 years ago this year. His enemies had him exiled, hoping he'd disappear from history. But instead he wrote a masterpiece, The Divine Comedy, making himself the hero of his own epic poem — and in so doing, attained literary immortality. This is the final episode in a three-part series that originally aired in May of 2002.…
 
This month, we're going back to school with stories of the most influential women educators in history. History classes can get a bad wrap, and sometimes for good reason. When we were students, we couldn’t help wondering... where were all the ladies at? Why were so many incredible stories missing from the typical curriculum? Enter, Encyclopedia Wom…
 
The horse is an important symbol in India’s culture, as shown by the many stories and works we see of Indian royalty and adventurers on horseback. As noted by Mughal chronicler Abu Fazl, “The horse is a means of attaining personal excellence.” Yet the horse isn’t native to India, with thousands of horses imported from Central Asia and the Middle Ea…
 
In July 1947, not even three months after Jackie Robinson debuted on the Brooklyn Dodgers, snapping the color line that had segregated Major League Baseball, Larry Doby would follow in his footsteps on the Cleveland Indians. Though Doby, as the second Black player in the majors, would struggle during his first summer in Cleveland, his subsequent tu…
 
The first all-encompassing book on Israel’s foreign policy and the diplomatic history of the Jewish people, The Star and the Scepter: A Diplomatic History of Israel (Jewish Publication Society, 2020) retraces and explains the interactions of Jews with other nations from the ancient kingdoms of Israel to modernity. Starting with the Hebrew Bible, Em…
 
Exploring Spinoza is based on an in-depth filmed conversation between Howard Burton and Susan James, Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck, University of London. Susan James is an internationally-renowned Spinoza scholar and author of Spinoza on Philosophy, Religion and Politics and Spinoza on Learning to Live Together which are discussed in detail d…
 
In July 1947, not even three months after Jackie Robinson debuted on the Brooklyn Dodgers, snapping the color line that had segregated Major League Baseball, Larry Doby would follow in his footsteps on the Cleveland Indians. Though Doby, as the second Black player in the majors, would struggle during his first summer in Cleveland, his subsequent tu…
 
Hamilton: An American Musical made its record-breaking Broadway debut in 2015—but the musical has reached far beyond typical Broadway audiences to pave a path into political discourse, pop culture, classroom curriculums, and the broader conversation about contemporary American politics. What led to this chain reaction of popularity, and how does it…
 
All regions and places are unique in their own way, but the Ozarks have an enduring place in American culture. Studying the Ozarks offers the ability to explore American life through the lens of one of the last remaining cultural frontiers in American society. Perhaps because the Ozarks were relatively isolated from mainstream American society, or …
 
On October 27, 1964, in a speech supporting the Republican presidential nominee Barry Goldwater, Ronald Reagan speaks of big government, high taxation, and the "war on poverty." He addresses foreign policy issues including the risk of appeasement, "peace through strength," and the Vietnam War. The speech changed his life, establishing him as a risi…
 
Tight hose caused the Black Death, licking a bear into existence, and the Ordeal of Water. In this episode, Danièle tells us about some of the stranger ideas that came up in the Middle Ages. To sign up for Danièle's masterclass, go to https://medievalmasterclass.thinkific.com/ You can listen to the first episode of Bow and Blade at https://www.medi…
 
Jeffrey Brown has the story of prominent poet Rita Dove confronting private pains and public strains; home and history. This report on her book, "Playlist for the Apocalypse," is part of our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/fundersBy PBS NewsHour
 
How many of your life’s ten biggest decisions have you already made? My guest today, psychologist Dr. Adrian Camilleri, would often ask this question to friends and family, and found that it generated a lot of interesting conversation. It also generated a lot of his own thoughts, which made him want to dive more deeply into it and empirically study…
 
In our first episode on Carlo Scarpa, we're trying something new! We've made a video to accompany the episode that you can find on our YouTube Channel, in which you can watch Luke and George discuss the enigmatic architecture of Carlo Scarpa, accompanied by images of the buildings! Make sure you subscribe on YouTube to keep up to date. This is an e…
 
Dante Alighieri died 700 years ago this year. His enemies had him exiled, hoping he'd disappear from history. But instead he wrote a masterpiece, The Divine Comedy, making himself the hero of his own epic poem — and in so doing, attained literary immortality. This is the second episode in a three-part series that originally aired in May of 2002.…
 
Saint Ludmila, the first historically documented duchess of Bohemia, was murdered on the 15th of September in the year 921. Together with her husband Bořivoj I, founder of the Přemyslid dynasty, she sought to spread Christianity throughout the Czech lands, and was de facto ruler of Bohemia after his death, when their sons were too young to sit on t…
 
Nancy Goldstone discusses the 18th-century family saga of Habsburg empress Maria Theresa, and her equally formidable daughters Nancy Goldstone discusses the 18th-century family saga of Habsburg Empress Maria Theresa and her equally formidable daughters (including Marie Antoinette) who married into royal houses around Europe. (Ad) Nancy Goldstone is…
 
This month, we're going back to school with stories of the most influential women educators in history. History classes can get a bad wrap, and sometimes for good reason. When we were students, we couldn’t help wondering... where were all the ladies at? Why were so many incredible stories missing from the typical curriculum? Enter, Encyclopedia Wom…
 
"El Chapo. The Untold Story of the World's Most Infamous Drug Lord" (Atria Books, 2021) is a stunning investigation of the life and legend of Mexican kingpin Joaquín Archivaldo “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera, building on Noah Hurowitz’s revelatory coverage for Rolling Stone of El Chapo’s federal drug-trafficking trial. This is the true story of how El Cha…
 
Howard talks to Henry Hardy, Fellow of Wolfson College, University of Oxford, and the author of In Search of Isaiah Berlin: A Literary Adventure about the many joys—and occasional frustrations—of being the principal editor of one of the 20th century's most captivating public intellectuals. Howard Burton is the founder of Ideas Roadshow, Ideas on Fi…
 
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