show episodes
 
Brought to you by the Liberal Arts Collective at the Pennsylvania State University, “Unraveling the Anthropocene” brings together academics, artists, activists, and community members from around the world to discuss issues at the intersection of race, environment, and pandemic.
 
Green Dreamer is a listener-supported, in(ter)dependent podcast exploring our paths to collective healing, ecological regeneration, and true abundance and wellness *for all*. Curious to unravel the dominant narratives that stunt our imaginations, and called to spark radical dreaming of what could be, we share conversations with an ever-expanding range of thought leaders—each inspiring us to deepen and broaden our awareness in their own ways. Subscribe to the show to learn from our diverse gu ...
 
Earth. We broke it; we own it; and nothing is as it was: not the trees, not the seas – not the forests, farms, or fields – and not the global economy that depends on all of these. Bionic Planet is your guide to the Anthropocene, the new epoch defined by man's impact on Earth, and in each episode, we examine a different aspect of this new reality: sometimes financial, sometimes moral, but always practical.
 
Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Science Weekly podcast will now explore some of the crucial scientific questions about Covid-19. Led by its usual hosts Ian Sample, Hannah Devlin and Nicola Davis, as well as the Guardian's health editor Sarah Boseley, we’ll be taking questions – some sent by you – to experts on the frontline of the global outbreak. Send us your questions here: theguardian.com/covid19questions
 
The Anthropocene is the current geological age, in which human activity has profoundly shaped the planet and its biodiversity. On The Anthropocene Reviewed, #1 New York Times bestselling author John Green (The Fault in Our Stars, Turtles All the Way Down) reviews different facets of the human-centered planet on a five-star scale. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with A ...
 
Life is complicated, but we love simple answers. AI and robotics are changing the nature of work. Emojis change the way we write. Fossil Fuels were once the engine of progress, now we're in a race to change how we power the planet. We're constantly trying to save ourselves...from ourselves. Join Anthropologist and culture expert Dr. Adam Gamwell for curated conversations with humanity’s top makers and minds on our creative potential through design, culture, business and technology. Change yo ...
 
stopGOstop, explores the idea that sound recordings can act as sediment– as an accumulation of recorded cultural material– distributed via rss feed, and listened to on headphones. Each episode is a new sonic layer, field recordings, plunderphonics, electroacoustic, all composed together in one episode, or presented individually as striations. Produced by John Wanzel
 
Conservation journalist Byron Pace speaks with scientists, environmental advocates, conservationists, wildlife managers and a diverse array of global guests, to uncover the complex nature of the world we live. Into The Anthropocene aims to make the science of conservation more accessible, exploring stories and research from the frontline. Only through understanding our world can we improve our decision making and define the Anthropocene for the betterment of humanity and the planet. Visit: w ...
 
How do we learn to negotiate a world of growing complexity and uncertainty? Perpetual Novelty is a six-episode set of conversations from Perry Chen, artist and the founder of Kickstarter. A long-time critic of the attention economy, Chen served on the Knight Commission on Trust, Media, and Democracy from 2017-18 to examine and make recommendations in response to the collapse in trust in U.S. democratic institutions, media, journalism, and the information ecosystem. In 2018, he was honored wi ...
 
An honest podcast about the state of our relationship with wild nature. Renouncing harmful anthropocentric ideals, focusing on true essentials for an adequate life as a human being; and recognizing the indispensability of our tremendously diverse world by establishing a greater sense of place within that world. ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ It will host an on-going discussion about the needs of nature, exploring the current environmental crisis, the importance of our reconnection t ...
 
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Unpolitical & Incorrect

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Unpolitical & Incorrect

Henry Kocatekin & Kai Dreyfus-Ballesi

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Why can some people dance in public, seemingly immune to the judgement of others? Can we do things that are objectively probably not the best, like littering, using plastic or eating meat, and justify our actions by big companies doing worse? What is the best hobby? You know all those ideas that pop into your head, live rent-free for a while, then disappear? We want to catch those ideas and look beneath the surface. Honestly, we could be called The Debt Collectors. We want to demand that if ...
 
Two philosophers—or what comedian Mel Brooks fondly refers to as "bullshit artists"—from different generations join in deep yet casual conversation covering a wide range of topics, including especially politics and the human condition. Jack Crittenden—professor emeritus of political theory at Arizona State University—and Rory Varrato—PhD candidate in the Philosophy and Education program at Teachers College, Columbia University—have known each other for more than ten years, first as teacher-s ...
 
Did you know that humans have now changed the earth more than all other natural forces combined? What the heck is the Anthropocene? How does it affect you and your life? In this series, we answer those questions as we journey across this planet and dig into some of the most urgent issues of our time. This is our world as you’ve never thought of it before. Hosted by Sarain Fox. New episodes are released on Tuesdays. This podcast was produced to go along with the exhibition Anthropocene, featu ...
 
Opinion Has It by Project Syndicate features conversations with leading economists, policymakers, authors, and researchers on the world’s most pressing issues. Tune in for biweekly analyses and insights with our host Elmira Bayrasli, Foreign Policy Interrupted co-founder and Project Syndicate contributor. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
Emergence Magazine is an online publication with annual print edition exploring the threads connecting ecology, culture, and spirituality. As we experience the desecration of our lands and waters, the extinguishing of species, and a loss of sacred connection to the Earth, we look to emerging stories. Our podcast features exclusive interviews, narrated essays, stories and more. During this pandemic, we are publishing new content that explores the deeper themes and questions emerging at this t ...
 
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Habitations

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Habitations

The Sage Magazine Podcast

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Habitations is the podcast of Sage Magazine, the environmental journalism and arts publication at the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies. It explores the relationships between humans and the places that they inhabit, through interviews and narrative pieces.
 
A is for Anthropocene: Living in the Age of Humanity is a bi-weekly podcast that digs into the multitude of questions about human impact on our planet. Host Sloan MacRae and Steve Tonsor interview experts in science and the arts to tackle tough issues like climate change and species decline without giving up hope that we can still leave the Earth in excellent condition for generations to come.
 
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The Schumacher Lectures

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The Schumacher Lectures

The Schumacher Center for a New Economics

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The 1st Annual E. F. Schumacher Lectures of October 1981 emphasized the importance of vibrant regional economies at a time when the focus of the nation was on an expanding global economy. Much has happened since then. The promise of the global economy has faded in face of ever greater wealth disparity and environmental degradation. There is growing interest in building a new economy that is just and recognizes planetary limits. The speakers of the Schumacher Lecture Series continue to be at ...
 
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show series
 
Kai starts by getting emotional over some celebrity's opinion. Henry proves incapable of succinctly answering what he likes about the audiobooks he listens to. Somehow the two white hosts segue to talking about fixing racism in the world. Strap on in, these theories are definitely well-founded! Finally, Kai calls Henry a tool. This time when the mi…
 
Soprano Renée Fleming today releases Voice of Nature: The Anthropocene, her new album with Yannick Nézet-Séguin, on Decca Classics. Inspired by the solace Fleming found while hiking near her Virginia home during lockdown, the album explores the centrality of nature in Romantic-era songs and highlights the peril and fragility of the natural world to…
 
Whether it's the discussion on rising sea levels or nuclear waste, islands have gravitated to the epicentre of the geopolitical zeitgeist. But why are we more interested in islands than ever before? Professor at the Centre for the Study of Democracy, David Chandler explores the importance of islands in the Anthropocene. See Privacy Policy at https:…
 
In this episode, LAC member Müge Gedik interviews Dr. Özlem Öğüt Yazıcıoğlu. Dr. Öğüt Yazıcıoğlu discusses her new book project Shamanism in the Contemporary Novel: Histories of Lands, Animals, and Peoples beyond the Nature/Culture Divide on shamanism in contemporary literature, encompassing Northern Siberia, China, North America, Australia, and Tu…
 
A new generation of technologies are transforming the world’s food-production system. Food scientists are producing cruelty-free meat in the lab, growing salad underground in vertical farms and bringing aquaculture on land. The Economist's US digital editor Jon Fasman uncovers the future of food. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out inform…
 
Two months after the Taliban’s victory, civilians face a looming disaster. Will Western governments dig their heels in, or turn the aid taps back on? India’s government has increasingly turned to high-tech means for delivering government services. But its digital-first solutions are inaccessible to millions of citizens. And we look at the business …
 
Both a symbol of the Mubarak government’s power and a component in its construction of national identity, football served as fertile ground for Egyptians to confront the regime’s overthrow during the 2011 revolution. With the help of the state, appreciation for football in Egypt peaked in the late 2000s. Yet after Mubarak fell, fans questioned thei…
 
Exploring the relationship between gender and events, Doing Gender in Events: Feminist Perspectives in Critical Event Studies (Routledge, 2021) delivers an ethnographic analysis of the celebration of gender equality in the context of the culture-led event. Drawing upon Critical Event Studies, Anthropology of the Festive, and Gender Studies, it prov…
 
Listen to this interview of Aliyah Kovner, science writer and also host of the podcast A Day in the Half-Life. We talk about who science communication reaches: peers, other experts, non-experts, you, me, everyone. Aliyah Kovner : "That's definitely a thing not talked about enough, that is: often the audience for science communication is the scienti…
 
Listen to this interview of Aliyah Kovner, science writer and also host of the podcast A Day in the Half-Life. We talk about who science communication reaches: peers, other experts, non-experts, you, me, everyone. Aliyah Kovner : "That's definitely a thing not talked about enough, that is: often the audience for science communication is the scienti…
 
Marking the third centenary of the office of Prime Minister, The Impossible Office?: The History of the British Prime Minister (Cambridge UP, 2021) tells its extraordinary story, explaining how and why it has endured longer than any other democratic political office in world history. Sir Anthony Seldon, historian of Number 10 Downing Street, explor…
 
How have the wellness and beauty industries thrived off of a dominant culture of non-acceptance? And what might be the healing potentials that lie in plant medicines—when their sacred origins and rituals are honored and respected? In this episode, we welcome Fariha Róisín. As a multidisciplinary artist who is a Muslim queer Bangladeshi, she is inte…
 
JS Bach's English Suites 1-3 Performed on the piano by Ashkenazy Purchase the music (without talk) at: JS Bach: English Suites 1-3 (classicalsavings.com) Your purchase helps to support our show! Classical Music Discoveries is sponsored by La Musica International Chamber Music Festival and Uber. @khedgecock #ClassicalMusicDiscoveries #KeepClassicalM…
 
Kai listens to last week's episode and decides to visit a cemetery. Henry meets an old funny guy, Mal at a new one he's visited. He then remembers reading about living arrangements where the young and old share one roof. Questions arise: if you're young, would you live with an old person? And if you're old, would you live with a young person? It's …
 
An old episode recorded before the pilot, it was released because it still contained some unusual thoughts. As has been established, Henry may not be your quintessential 20-something year old. But can he convince Kai on the benefits of visiting cemeteries...as a pastime...regularly...when you know no one buried there?! Moral of the episode: A facto…
 
The World Health Organisation recently declared that air pollution is the greatest environmental threat to health globally. What do cities and governments need to do to clean up their act? Also, we explore how Occam’s razor, ​​a theory from a medieval theologist, has influenced science. And, could music be an effective way to communicate with extra…
 
The World Health Organisation recently declared that air pollution is the greatest environmental threat to health globally. What do cities and governments need to do to clean up their act? Also, we explore how Occam’s razor, ​​a theory from a medieval theologist, has influenced science. And, could music be an effective way to communicate with extra…
 
In a Covid world we have been focused on safety. Yet almost all of us choose to engage in activities, from swimming in the sea to driving a car or having a bottle of wine, that carry risks. In fact, more died globally last year from alcohol than Covid. So how do we assess what risks to take and how much time and resource to protect ourselves from f…
 
Dara McAnulty is a teenage autistic author, naturalist, and conservationist from Northern Ireland. After several years of writing his blog, Naturalist Dara, he published his debut book, Diary of a Young Naturalist, when he was fourteen years old. The book won the 2020 Wainwright Prize for Nature Writing, and Book of the Year for the Narrative Non-f…
 
Just as the country was moving towards democracy, its generals have overthrown the civilians—again. We look at what sparked the unrest, and why coups in Africa are on the rise. Ecuador declared a state of emergency last week over a wave of violent crime. It’s just one of several headaches for Guillermo Lasso, the country’s president. And we explain…
 
Many experts have called for the reintroduction of some public health measures to reduce transmission rates. However, the government has repeatedly said it is not yet bringing in its so-called ‘plan B’ for England. Madeleine Finlay speaks to science correspondent Nicola Davis about what ‘plan B’ could entail and whether it would help us avoid the n…
 
Christine Schwöbel-Patel's Marketing Global Justice: The Political Economy of International Criminal Law (Cambridge UP, 2021) is a critical study of efforts to 'sell' global justice. The book offers a new reading of the rise of international criminal law as the dominant institutional expression of global justice, linking it to the rise of branding.…
 
Connected: How a Mexican Village Built Its Own Cell Phone Network (U California Press, 2020) is the true story of how, against all odds, a remote Mexican pueblo built its own autonomous cell phone network—without help from telecom companies or the government. Anthropologist Roberto J. González paints a vivid and nuanced picture of life in a Oaxaca …
 
The Immigrant-Food Nexus: Borders, Labor, and Identity in North America (MIT Press, 2020) considers the intersection of food and immigration at both the macroscale of national policy and the microscale of immigrant foodways—the intimate, daily performances of identity, culture, and community through food. Taken together, the chapters—which range fr…
 
In Defending Beef: The Ecological and Nutritional Case for Meat (Chelsea Green, 2021), Nicolette Hahn Niman makes the expanded case for large ruminants as part of the solution to the climate crisis. In our discussion, Hahn Niman does some myth-busting and presents a system for managing beef cattle that can enhance ecosystems rather than degrade the…
 
Connected: How a Mexican Village Built Its Own Cell Phone Network (U California Press, 2020) is the true story of how, against all odds, a remote Mexican pueblo built its own autonomous cell phone network—without help from telecom companies or the government. Anthropologist Roberto J. González paints a vivid and nuanced picture of life in a Oaxaca …
 
The American media has been focused on the Supreme Court’s upcoming abortion cases but a decision in a critical Second Amendment case could overturn public safety laws for 25% of Americans. Next week, the Court will hear arguments in New York State Rifle & Pistol Association v. Bruen, a challenge to a 1911 New York State law that limits carrying gu…
 
Listen to this interview of Jari Saramäki, author of How to Write a Scientific Paper: An Academic Self-Help Guide for PhD Students (2018) and professor of computational science at Aalto University, Finland. We talk about how hard soft skills are. Jari Saramäki : "Yes, I think that there is something to a kind of immersion approach to learning. Beca…
 
Actions to combat climate change have been primarily focused on mitigation - limiting the amount of greenhouse-gas emissions in the atmosphere. But even with those efforts, the planet's temperature will continue to rise, leading to more extreme weather events. How will humanity adapt? Bill Gates, the co-founder of Microsoft, tells us why adaptation…
 
Covid certificates are a global mess, with countries operating a patchwork of incompatible systems. We look at why it’s so difficult to standardise digital health passes. When the results of Uzbekistan’s elections are published today, the only surprise will be the margin of victory for Shavkat Mirziyoyev, the country’s autocratic leader since 2016.…
 
Data is now central to the economy, government, and health systems—so why are data and the AI systems that interpret the data in the hands of so few people? Alex Pentland and Alexander Lipton's Building the New Economy: Data As Capital (MIT Press, 2021) calls for us to reinvent the ways that data and artificial intelligence are used in civic and go…
 
Professor Anna Spain Bradley "wrote this book to be accessible to anyone, because international law is for everyone." In this important book, Professor Anna Spain Bradley explores human choice in international law and political decision making. Human Choice in International Law (Cambridge University Press, 2021) investigates the neurobiological pro…
 
In Political Science, we are very familiar with the work of scholars who try to unpack why the ERA failed to get the required states. But Gendered Citizenship: The Original Conflict over the Equal Rights Amendment, 1920-1963 published by the University of Nebraska in 2021 interrogates how earlier debates on the ERA transcended traditional political…
 
Recorded: October 7, 2021 This week my guest is the delightful Kimiko Glenn! We talk about her childhood dream of being in theater, her experience on “Orange is the New Black” as her first television gig, how acting in “Liza On Demand” introduced her to the YouTube world, her friendship with Liza Koshy, and voicing Izzy Moonbow in “My Little Pony: …
 
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the real-time revolution transforming economics, how insurgency, secessionism and banditry threaten Nigeria (10:06) and our Bartleby columnist on why corporate mission statements deserve more than an eye-roll (17:39) Please subscribe to The Economi…
 
Faust is an opera in five acts by Charles Gounod to a French libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carré from Carré's play Faust et Marguerite, in turn loosely based on Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's Faust, Part One. It debuted at the Théâtre Lyrique on the Boulevard du Temple in Paris on 19 March 1859, with influential sets designed by Charles-Antoin…
 
French-American pianist Julia Den Boer today releases her second album, Kermès, on New Focus Recordings. The album's four stunning works by experimental female composers include Giulia Lorusso’s Déserts, Linda Catlin Smith’s The Underfolding, Anna Thorvaldsdottir’s Reminiscence, and Rebecca Saunders’ Crimson. Kermès Track List 1. Giulia Lorusso — D…
 
Wages are going up and employees are walking out - some to strike, some never to come back. American workers have more leverage than before the pandemic. How permanent is this shift in power? The Economist’s Simon Rabinovitch takes us to a picket line in Pennsylvania and we go back to an earlier walk out in Hollywood. Betsey Stevenson, one of Presi…
 
Beautiful minimalistic music to relax and enjoy the beauties around you. Composed by Erland Cooper and Kathryn Joseph Tracklisting: A Thing of Beauty is a Joy Forever Its Loveliness Increases It Will Never Pass Into Nothingness But Still Will Keep a Bower Quiet for Us And a Sleep Full of Sweet Dreams And Health and Quiet Breathing Watch Erland's Yo…
 
Warning: Explicit Conversations About Politics, Culture, & Sexuality Cruising down the crack of Kink Month, we explore various kinks, fetishes, fantasies, peculiarities and love styles including…• Trumpty Dumpty’s recent unprompted proclamation that he’s *NOT* into “golden showers”—which really means he IS… and the not-so-hidden meaning of MAGA is …
 
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