show episodes
 
Everywhere around us are echoes of the past. Those echoes define the boundaries of states and countries, how we pray and how we fight. They determine what money we spend and how we earn it at work, what language we speak and how we raise our children. From Wondery, host Patrick Wyman, PhD (“Fall Of Rome”) helps us understand our world and how it got to be the way it is.
 
Discover ancient Egypt, in their own words. This podcast uses ancient texts and archaeology to uncover the lost world of the Nile Valley. A tale of pharaohs, pyramids, gods, and people. The show is written by a trained Egyptologist and uses detailed, up-to-date research. We dive deep into the ancient society, to uncover their fascinating tales. A member of the Agora Podcast Network. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
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Hysterical History

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Hysterical History

Alexis Lord and Hailey Strickon

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Hysterical History is a comedy podcast where Alexis and Hailey, friends and history lovers, tell each other wacky yet factual stories from the past. Join them every TUESDAY for laughs and weird history realness. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
The podcast that transports you to the ancient world and back, with some good conversation along the way. It's not just about ancient Greece. It's about a huge chunk of human history that the Greek texts give us access to: from Egypt and Babylon, to Persia, to Carthage and Rome, we'll sail the wine-dark sea of history with some expert guides at the helm. Topics will include archaeology, literature, and philosophy. New episode every month.
 
Did you know that Europeans used to believe that sheep grew from Mongolian trees? Have you heard about the misbegotten discovery of a new form of water in the 1960s that set off a cold war arms race? Ever seen the gleaming Las Vegas hotel that accidentally shoots heat rays at poolside guests? The Constant is an audio history of getting things wrong. From ancient science to contemporary blunders, we take you on journeys of misadventure and misapprehension, filling your brain with juicy nugget ...
 
This podcast is an introduction to Anglophone literature, from ancient times to the present, done by a Ph.D. with lots of books and musical instruments. A typical episode offers a summary of a work, or part of a work of literature, followed by some historical analysis. The episodes include original music, some comedy songs, and goofy jokes. You can listen to the shows in any order, although from time to time, episodes will make brief mention of previous or upcoming ones.
 
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History of Africa

1
History of Africa

The History of Africa Podcast

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Take a deep dive deep into African history with this in-depth podcast. From Casablanca to Cape Town, tune in to this podcast to learn about the magnificent and oft-forgotten history of Africa. To access more free resources about African history, provide feedback, or support the show, check out our associated website at https://historyofafricapodcast.blogspot.com
 
The Irish History Podcast brings you on a journey through Ireland's fascinating past. This podcast is not just dates but an enthralling account of Ireland's history, looking at daily life through the ages. The show is currently focused on the Great Irish Famine of the 1840s (see below), while the archive contains the stories of Ireland's ancient High Kings, Viking raiders and the Norman Invasion of the Middle Ages. The story of the Great Famine has proved the most popular to date, Between 18 ...
 
A podcast about the history of ancient Greece for people new to and familiar with Ancient Greek history.The Casting Through Ancient Greece podcast will focus on telling the story of Ancient Greece starting from the pre history through Archaic Greece, Classical Greece and up to the Hellenistic period. Featured throughout the podcast series will be Major events such as the Greek and Persian wars, The Peloponnesian war and Alexander the Greats war against Persia. www.castingthroughancientgreece ...
 
A fast-moving history of the western world from the ancient world to the present day. Examine how the emergence of the western world as a global dominant power was not something that should ever have been taken for granted. This podcast traces the development of western civilization starting in the ancient Near East, through Greece and Rome, past the collapse of the Western Roman Empire into the Dark Ages, and then follows European and, ultimately, American history as the western world moved ...
 
Proudly brought to you by the fine folks at the Astonishing Legends Podcast- Not just another show but a place you can go: The Midnight Library. You alone, can climb the stairs of the strange, old Victorian mansion and be somewhat welcomed by your Hosts, Miranda Merrick & Mr. Darling. Curl up in a window seat or beside the grand fireplace and hear a tale of times long ago. Be transported to forgotten lands, learn about ancient customs and mysterious happenings… all in the company of your unu ...
 
Mongol Invasions, Napoleonic Wars, Diadochi Wars, Rome and the Cold War. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our world. Hosted by David Schroder for Kings and Generals.
 
A podcast for all ancient history fans! The Ancients is dedicated to discussing our distant past. Featuring interviews with historians and archaeologists, each episode covers a specific theme from antiquity. From Neolithic Britain to the Fall of Rome. Hosted by Tristan Hughes.
 
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Fan of History

1
Fan of History

Dan Hörning & Bernie Maopolski

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Dan and Bernie discuss the events of ancient history all over the world, decade per decade, starting at 1000 BC and moving forwards. Learn all about the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the mighty Pharaohs and the great kings of the Zhou Dynasty and more. Meet personalities like Ashurnasirpal II, Homer, Sennacherib, king Mu and the Buddha. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
In "Hardcore History" journalist and broadcaster Dan Carlin takes his "Martian", unorthodox way of thinking and applies it to the past. Was Alexander the Great as bad a person as Adolf Hitler? What would Apaches with modern weapons be like? Will our modern civilization ever fall like civilizations from past eras? This isn't academic history (and Carlin isn't a historian) but the podcast's unique blend of high drama, masterful narration and Twilight Zone-style twists has entertained millions ...
 
An Everyperson's guide to a 150 years of research into the history presented in the Bible, for people of all faiths and backgrounds. I explore the religion of ancient Israel, the beginnings of Christianity, then finally the evolution of the heirs of Abraham to the year 200. I discuss every single book in every Bible (there are more than you think!). Lightly garnished with a dash of drollery, a soupcon of scrutiny, and not one ounce of objectivity. Not one ounce!
 
Germany has been a major player in the last 100 years for the world and is well known for its role in World War 2 and creating the world we know today. But how much do you know about the Germany before? Or about the Germany after? Did you know that the German tribes conquered most of Roman Europe and Africa? What about Prussia, the nation to unite Germany, was formerly abolished in 1947? This podcast will cover aspects of culture, politics, military, gender, and day to day life from when we ...
 
Barbarians, political breakdown, economic collapse, mass migration, pillaging and plunder. The fall of the Roman Empire has been studied for years, but genetics, climate science, forensic science, network models, and globalization studies have reshaped our understanding of one of the most important events in human history. PhD historian and specialist Patrick Wyman brings the cutting edge of history to listeners in plain, relatable English.
 
Survive the Jive podcast is about history and ancient religions and folklore. Hosted by historian Thomas Rowsell who is also a documentary film maker, this podcast focuses mainly on Indo-European cultures and most specifically on Germanic/Norse paganism. The podcast takes a holistic approach to programming that informs, educates and improves us. It sometimes covers scientific topics but is mainly concerned with pre-Christian religions of Europe. Sometimes the podcasts are based on videos fro ...
 
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show series
 
What tales kept people from thousands of years ago up at night? This Halloween, Ancient History Fangirl teams up with Liv Albert from Let’s Talk About Myths, Baby! to delve into spooky stories from the ancient world that will send a shiver up your spine—tales of shrieking Banshees, deathly Furies, and the terrors of Samhain. So spread some salt ove…
 
Support the podcast on Patreon: www.patreon.com/bookishthoughtsFollow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/thatsancientAnd check out our website: https://www.jeanmenzies.com/podcastCheck out host Jean's book on greek myths: https://amzn.to/3oVrqKvAnd discover more about antiquity in video format on her YouTube channel: https://www.jeanmenzies.com/anc…
 
Occult Series #3 of 4. Whether we’ve ever really given it any study, we’re all at least a little familiar with the link between the Nazi party and the occult. Movies like Captain America and Hellboy have plot lines that center on supernatural obsessions of Nazi leadership, desperately trying to find magical or supernatural ways of winning the war a…
 
In the 4th century BCE the region of Thessaly underwent a transformation. It went from being fractured to becoming a unified state under the leadership of Jason. In a short time Jason became a prominent player in Greece, earning the admiration of Xenophon and calling the shots after Leuctra. But then it all ended abruptly. How did he achieve this? …
 
Located to the south of Egypt, in today’s Sudan, ancient Nubia had a complicated relationship with the old state of the Nile, and scholars have traditionally understood it through the shadow of its much better understood northern neighbor. But, as Dr. Geoff Emberling of the University of Michigan explains, Nubia had a long and fascinating history o…
 
Magellan had made it through several mutinies. But he had yet to defeat his most intractable foe: the strait. But where was this mysterious strait around South America? To find it, Magellan would need to pass through the Dragon's Tail. Find more content at westerncivpodcast.com. Become a Patron today at patreon.com/westerncivpodcast…
 
Greg Jenner is joined by comedian Elis James and historian Dr Katherine Hurlock to explore the life and political career of medieval Welsh rebel Owain Glyndŵr, the last Welsh-born Prince of Wales, who led an uprising against English rule. It’s an extraordinary tale of war, vengeance, poetry, annoying next-door neighbours, top-notch gardens and prob…
 
**Give Away details** To coincide with this episode release I will be running a giveaway where I will be offering up 2 copies of Eric Cline’s Book, 1177 BC the Year Civilisation Collapsed, where winners will be drawn on the 1st of November 2021. 1 copy I will be offering as a general giveaway, where all you need to do to go into the draw is to prom…
 
In part two of this two-part series, Ben is joined once again with guest host Alex Williams to explore the harrowing tale of the New England Vampire Panic, tracing how increasingly desperate communities resorted to ritualistic desecration of graves to combat the horrors of what some believed to be a supernatural affliction. (And how the rest of the…
 
The discovery of 21,000-23,000-year-old human footprints at White Sands National Park in New Mexico is one of the most exciting developments in the study of the deep past in recent years. But do these footprints hold up to real scrutiny? And if they’re real, how do they change our understanding of the first people in the Americas? I asked two exper…
 
Gold and horses! 2,500 years ago, in the area of the Great Steppe that is now Eastern Kazakhstan, an extraordinary ancient Scythian culture reigned supreme. They were called the Saka, renowned for their skill as horse archers and for their elaborate elite burials. Ancient Persian and Greek sources labelled them a barbaric, nomadic people – a scourg…
 
Dan and Bernie continue to discuss religon in Assyria. This is a podcast by Dan Hörning and Bernie Maopolski. If you like what we do you can support the Fan of History project on https://www.patreon.com/fanofhistory Contact information: http://facebook.com/fanofhistory https://twitter.com/danhorning https://www.instagram.com/dan_horning/ Music: “Tu…
 
While historians continue to explore the details of the infamous Salem witch trials, another, earlier panic swept through New England -- something modern historians often refer to as the "Vampire Panic." In part one of this two-part series, Ben is joined again with guest host Alex Williams, creator of the Ephemeral podcast, to explore the brutal re…
 
Join in as we talk to Jesse Alexander and Cathérine Pfauth who work on the absolutely fantastic project called Glory and Defeat. This project provides a needed indepth study of the Franco Prussian war including a week by week study of the war. You can find their channel at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCB1eDEd1AYG3YrRIJSZzMOQ…
 
I sit down for an interview with historian and author Edward Shawcross to discuss his new book, The Last Emperor of Mexico. Did you know that in the 1860's Emperor Napoleon III of France tried to put an Austrian Archduke on the throne of Mexico? Did you know this is where we get the origin of Cinco de Mayo? Find out all this and more here and buy t…
 
Education is a deeply-held value embedded in families and throughout the North Caucasus. From early childhood through the university years, high levels of academic achievement are considered “normal,” according to our guest today. Madina from Ingushetia shares about her personal experience growing up as a student, and now as a top English tutor in …
 
Seek and Discover. In this episode, we begin the tale of the most famous tomb in history. KV62, a small monument, in the lower reaches of the Valley of the Kings. Overlooked for three thousand years, the tomb finally emerged thanks to a persistent excavator and a stroke of good fortune. However, the Tomb of Tutankhamun has built up its own mytholog…
 
Brussels sprouts aren’t the favorite of many, and there could be a good reason for that. The often-overboiled side dish comes complete with a mushy texture, yellowed color and a rotten-egg smell that stays in your house and your hair for days. But, if you cook them right, it’s a whole other story. And you better cook them right, because some say ev…
 
A long story, made short, and then long again, is finally ready to end. Join us for part three, the story of one guy who singlehandedly solved the most difficult problem in human history. Sort of. Kinda. Not really. But a little bit! If you enjoyed this saga, give Dava Sobel's Longitude a read. Continue your education via University of California I…
 
This week, we lift our spirits (oooOOOooo) with a round-up of monsters. We explore their origins and effects on us, with examples ranging from memories of very real things in the past to a hypothesis that doesn't quite have legs (unlike griffins). Links Why we'll always be obsessed with – and afraid of – monsters (The Conversation) Why the scariest…
 
The most controversial part of Plato's Republic is its fifth book, wherein Socrates argues for the political equality of men and women, the abolition of the nuclear family, a strange eugenics program, and the idea that philosophers kings and philosopher queens should be put in charge of political affairs. With us to discuss book 5 is Mary Townsend,…
 
This is the first of three back-to-back episodes that will take us through one of the most critical periods of the war. The Autumn of 1920 witnessed an intensification of the conflict as British Crown forces began to get the upper hand on the IRA. This lead to two key events in Dublin - the Fernside Raid & the Execution of Kevin Barry. While these …
 
You know the legend he created. Tonight, our reading will tell you just how eerily all of the spooky pieces of Bram Stoker’s life fell precisely into place so that he could give the world--DRACULA! Stoker had the right illness, the right grim mother, friends, books, and even the right nightmare that contributed to the making of the perfect literary…
 
In 417 CE, the Roman poet Rutilius Namatianus journeyed from Rome back to his homeland of Gaul, not knowing whether there was a home to return to. Episode 95 Quiz: https://literatureandhistory.com/index.php/episode-95-quiz Episode 95 Transcription: https://literatureandhistory.com/index.php/episode-095-rutilius-namatianus Bonus Content: https://lit…
 
Often up there in the upper echelons of most articles listing Rome's worst emperors, it's fair to say that history has not been kind to Caracalla. Whether it was contemporary sources depicting him as a deranged Heracles and Alexander the Great loving megalomaniac or the 18th century historian Edward Gibbon labelling him 'the common enemy of mankind…
 
While many different explorers discovered new lands, only Magellan tried to circumnavigate the globe. In our first of three Magellan episodes, we discuss not only how the voyage began but the various reasons it almost did not. Check out westerncivpodcast.com for more episodes! Become a Patron for exclusive bonus content at patreon.com/westerncivpod…
 
After marrying and having three children, Ada dove back into the world of poetical science, continuing her correspondence with Charles Babbage as he tried to garner support for his ambitious, expensive analytical engine. In the second part of this two-part series, the guys explore how Ada's work -- and prescience -- created a profound legacy that r…
 
In addition to the latest CHP episode on the L.A. Chinatown Massacre, I also wanted to offer you a reading of an article that appeared in an 1894 edition of The Historical Society of Southern California journal. This article by C.P. Dorland was written only twenty-three years after the incident took place and described the events leading up to, dur…
 
On October 24th, 1871 the Los Angeles Chinatown Massacre took place near the present-day location of Union Station, just north of the core downtown L.A. area. Though mostly unknown rather than forgotten, this incident that happened one hundred fifty years ago this month will be remembered through a number of commemorative events. The Chinese Americ…
 
Appius Claudius: what a man, what a couple of decemvirates! But while the title of this episode might have given some things away, it’s all about how it happens. If our sources are to be believed, 449 BCE was one hell of a year. In our previous episode, we witnessed the end of the tyrannical Second Decemvirate and the Second Secession of the Plebei…
 
The Middle Kingdom, beginning around 2000 BC, was the second of ancient Egypt’s classical ages. Powerful pharaohs ruled from the cataracts of the Nile to the Mediterranean, building enormous monuments and patronizing exceptional art and literature. But on either side of the Middle Kingdom lay two ages of chaos, the Intermediate Periods, when the ph…
 
Dads who devour their children. Disembodied baby heads. Corpses that stand up on the battlefield to prophesy doom. Women who return from the grave to carry on steamy affairs. The Ancient Greeks did ghost stories...a little differently. This week, we team up with Liv Albert from Let’s Talk About Myths, Baby! to bring you three ghostly tales from anc…
 
A theatre, a gymnasium and houses with colonnaded courtyards: these are the hallmarks of an Ancient Greek city. So what are they doing in the city of Ai Khanum, far east of their origins in present day Afghanistan? In this first part of Tristan’s chat with Milinda Hoo, she takes us through the structures found in this ancient city, and what they te…
 
Cannabis sativa has been cultivated by humans for thousands of years both as a narcotic and also for making hemp fabrics. Brand new genetic and archaeological evidence places the original domestication event in China, but indicates that the plant was mainly spread by Indo-European peoples such as the Yamnaya and the Scythians. Cannabis was used in …
 
The number 13 really does have some baggage attached to it, and not all of it is deserving! We as a society may like to think we aren’t superstitious like people from ancient times or even the Middle Ages, but in fact we all still do a lot of things that stem from the superstitions of our ancestors. On this episode, we’re going to show you how the …
 
Today Ada Lovelace is hailed as one of the most important figures in the early history of computing -- but, during her childhood, her mother was worried she might take after her father, the famous poet (and infamous philanderer) Lord Byron. Learn more about Ada's childhood in part one of this two-part series. Learn more about your ad-choices at htt…
 
Tutankhamun's Funeral. Following his death, the body of Tutankhamun underwent mummification. From studying his body, archaeologists can identify strange aspects of his preservation. We also know many details of his burial, thanks to paintings in the tomb, and curious items discovered nearby. From these sources, we can imagine King Tutankhamun’s fun…
 
The Mongols were famous for their ultimatums of destruction and submission. No shortage of thirteenth century states received demands for their unconditional surrender to the Great Khan granted divine mandate to rule by Eternal Blue Heaven. Initially, the Mongol imperial ideology was extremely black and white: you could submit to Mongol rule, or fa…
 
With Osei Tutu killed in action, the Ashanti descend into an extended succession dispute. As chaos envelopes the Ashanti, their capital is sacked by a foreign invasion, leading to a compromise to enstool a new king. The new asantehene was a teenager named Opoku Ware. While nobody knew it yet, the teenage king would eventually go on to double the em…
 
This week, we're taking a turn for the cryptid and spooking local with the legend of West Virginia native son, the Mothman. For a little over a year leading up to December 1967, sightings of a winged humanoid with glowing eyes were reported in and around Point Pleasant, WV. Since then, Mothman has evolved from evil omen to legend to meme. In this e…
 
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