show episodes
 
With all the noise created by a 24/7 news cycle, it can be hard to really grasp what's going on in politics today. We provide a fresh perspective on the biggest political stories not through opinion and anecdotes, but rigorous scholarship, massive data sets and a deep knowledge of theory. Understand the political science beyond the headlines with Harris School of Public Policy Professors William Howell, Anthony Fowler and Wioletta Dziuda. Our show is part of the University of Chicago Podcast ...
 
Where politics, religion and history collide - and it's not always polite! Political opinion podcast hosted by former political science instructor and current political observer Jaye Pool. Left-leaning yet not perfectly bound by ideology. Historical context with a dose of progressive Christianity in the mix. #StirThePot #Resist #p2 #progressiveChristian #Exvangelical
 
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show series
 
Something curious has happened in American politics. Andrew Yang of 2016 presidential election fame has launched a third party, The Forward Party, and he's attracting some attention. A key feature of this party is a belief in ranked choice voting and raising up the possibility that through ranked choice voting, we might recover our our democracy.We…
 
In a public release of this bonus episode originally released on Patreon in November 2019, Jaye talks more urban legends by discussing a couple of processed food-related legends. Is McDonalds adding animal byproducts and other gross fillers to their hamburgers? Are popular meat substitutes such as Beyond Burger and the Impossible Burger "indistingu…
 
Nearly a decade ago, the Supreme Court effectively removed the "preclearance" process in its Shelby County v. Holder decision. That process had been implemented for decades as part of the Voting Rights Act and required places with a history of racial discrimination to get approval from the Justice Department before changing their voting procedures.…
 
Advocates for the striking down of Roe by the Supreme Court say this will improve our politics by allowing people’s preferences to be better represented at the State level. But do State and local governments accurately match the preferences of their citizens when responding to their demands? It’s a difficult question to answer, but one paper by NYU…
 
Author and former evangelical pastor George Azar joins Jaye to discuss his new book, My Gay Church Days, his memoir about his life while in evangelical Christianity, where he eventually joined church leadership, while keeping secret his truth as a gay man. This real and candid conversation touches on themes such as belonging and the cost of accepta…
 
There’s long been a belief that the Supreme Court rarely departs from precedent. But as the court appears to intend to strike down Roe, we’re wondering what the data tell us about how consistent the Supreme Court has been at honoring precedent. And, is the Supreme Court more likely to depart from precedent in constitutional cases than other types? …
 
In this episode of Potstirrer Podcast, Jaye reacts to the leaked draft US Supreme Court Opinion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization. Written by Justice Samuel Alito, the draft majority opinion signals an overturning of the Roe v. Wade precedent regarding abortion, and would leave abortion rights up to the states. Jaye argues that Alito'…
 
There are many questions surrounding the nature of money in politics, but one of the first order questions we should be asking is who exactly is donating that money? We now have access to more data than ever due to a dramatic increase in small donations through online fundraising platforms. Georgetown University Economist Laurent Bouton digs throug…
 
CONTENT WARNING: This episode contains content discussing explicit sexuality, sexual assault and harassment, violence, and suicide. Listener discretion is advised. In this public release of a Patreon bonus episode originally released in November 2018, Jaye goes back in time to tell the story of the impeachment of President Bill Clinton in 1998, and…
 
As the academic year draws to a close at The University of Chicago, our hosts are busy attending to the last minute activities of a professor. So, this week we wanted to re-share one of our favorite episodes interrogating a radically different proposal to fix the filibuster rather than abolishing it altogether. The filibuster is still one of the mo…
 
One of the biggest questions surrounding the conflict in Ukraine is to what extent the shadow of nuclear war affects the degree of involvement by Western countries. Much of the literature in nuclear deterrence theory assumes the incentives of mutually assured destruction are strong enough to avoid a nuclear war, and hence the existence of nuclear c…
 
Activist, artist and podcaster Andrew Pledger joins Jaye on this episode of Potstirrer Podcast to share his compelling story about growing up in Christian fundamentalism and his road to recovery from spiritual abuse. The conversation includes discussion of mental health, religious trauma and abuse, and the role of ultra conservative Christianity in…
 
When it comes to cable news, Fox and CNN have pretty partisan viewers. So, what would happen if Fox viewers tuned into CNN for a month? Would they suddenly adopt different views more aligned with CNN? UC Berkeley political scientist David Broockman and his colleagues wanted to find out. When they paid Fox News viewers to watch CNN, they found that …
 
By now, we've heard a lot about how state-owned Russian television is distorting the truth about the war in Ukraine. But Russian TV doesn't just reach Russian viewers. Some Ukrainians can receive its analog television signals. To understand how this propaganda influences Ukrainians, we turned to New York University political scientist Arturas Rozen…
 
In this episode, Jaye focuses on a particular argument politicians and pundits make when countries reckon with past and present incidents of national shame, which is that other countries also have shameful incidents in their histories. Jaye discusses why - although the thought experiment is intriguing - the argument itself is deflection which silen…
 
We know that lobbyists have the power to influence politics. But not all lobbyists are working on behalf of corporate interest groups. Sometimes, city officials actually hire lobbyists to represent the interests of their constituents in the state legislature. Why would cities do this? This is what New York University political science professor Jul…
 
Christian fiction author Allison K. Garcia returns to Potstirrer Podcast to discuss the final installment of the Buscando Home series, Finding Paz. Allison and Jaye's heartfelt discussion includes some of the themes in the novel, such as grief, separation from family, and familial connection on the journey the characters take to find peace. In addi…
 
Russia has invaded Ukraine. This horrible global crisis raises questions about Putin’s ultimate ambitions, and how nations can make credible deterrent threats in incredible circumstances. We’re not experts on the Ukraine conflict, but we can dive into the political science research to get some clarity on the underlying dynamics that may be at play.…
 
In Episode 100, Jaye celebrates the milestone by taking on the topic of cancel culture. Cancel culture is praised by advocates and maligned by critics, but is often ill-defined. Jaye delves into the origin and types of cancel culture, including the deplatforming of celebrities, boycotting of companies, and shaming of private individuals, as respons…
 
You've probably heard this one before: college football games and shark attacks influence elections in favor of incumbents. Surprising findings like these are exciting, and seem to tell us a lot about the stability of our democracy and the rationality of voters. If you listen to our podcasts regularly, you’ve probably also heard this one: Anthony F…
 
Christian ethicist, associate professor and author Maureen O'Connell, PhD joins Jaye on this episode of Potstirrer Podcast to discuss her new book, Undoing the Knots: Five Generations of American Catholic Anti-Blackness, a in-depth, historical and introspective examination of Philadelphia's Irish Catholic community. This rich and thought-provoking …
 
In the annual Potstirrer Podcast holiday special War on Christmas 2021, Jaye's husband Chuckles joins to discuss walking away from political conservatism and the Republican Party. Chuckles and Jaye discuss issues such as the Second Amendment, broken governance, and more. Twitter: @potstirrercast IG: @potstirrerpodcast Facebook: https://www.facebook…
 
We often think of polarization as a single policy spectrum with Democrats to the left and Republicans to the right. But what if this entire framework is wrong, and this error itself is worsening the divides in our country? This is what Michigan State University political scientist Matt Grossman argues in his article: “Ideological Republicans and Gr…
 
This multi-episode series is about efforts to suppress or limit the vote in certain communities across the United States in order to achieve specific outcomes. In Part 3, Jaye talks about the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the voting rights timeline following the VRA being signed into law. Several methods of voter suppression, from gerrymandering to…
 
If you watch cable news or open your twitter feed it may seem like Americans are more polarized than ever. It certainly feels like everyone is on the far ends of two diametrically opposed ideologies. But, if you look closely at the data, this current conventional wisdom may be wrong.Our very own co-host Anthony Fowler has developed a reputation on …
 
CONTENT WARNING: The following episode includes discussion of domestic violence, sexual assault and abuse, including that of children. Listener discretion is advised. This public release of a bonus episode originally released on Patreon in April 2019 includes extra bonus segments from Jaye's conversation with her brother Ervin that were not include…
 
There’s a long tradition in political science of using voter rationality to test the health of our democracy. But could this myopia be misguided? Are there any situations where irrational and uninformed voters could actually generate a healthier democracy? That’s exactly what University of Chicago political scientist Ethan BdM examines in his paper…
 
In this episode, Jaye discusses "The Great Resignation," the abnormally high number of American workers voluntarily walking away from work, which has been a constant trend since April 2021. Why are so many workers leaving their jobs or even careers? Jaye dispels the myth of the "lazy unemployed who don't want to work," and points out what most "qui…
 
When it comes to polarization, most people in American politics blame the voters. But much of the political science data suggests most voters are actually moderates. So, where are all the moderate politicians? In a new book, “Who Wants To Run?: How The Devaluing of Political Office Drives Polarization”, Stanford political scientist Andrew Hall argu…
 
Jaye announces a move to a Thursday fortnightly schedule, and introduces Potstirrer Scoops! - a shorter, commentary-based format that will be used for some episodes going forward. In the first episode of Potstirrer Scoops!, Jaye discusses the recent arrest of two Columbus, Ohio police officers on federal drug charges. Topics covered include the dru…
 
In 1964, political scientist Philip Converse published one of the most citied papers in the discipline: “The nature of belief systems in mass publics”. It attempted to define just how consistent and sophisticated are the political beliefs of the American public. In our current moment, when democracy seems in the balance of an ideologically polarize…
 
CONTENT WARNING: The following episode includes discussion of pregnancy termination, sexual assault, gun violence and domestic terrorism. Listener discretion is advised. Jaye gives her thoughts on the recently-implemented Texas law restricting abortion past six weeks gestation. The discussion includes maternal mortality, adoption, surveillance cult…
 
As the delta variant of the coronavirus continues to surge across the U.S. the question of should we lockdown again is on a lot of people’s minds. But, shouldn’t we stop and look at the data to see if lockdowns work?In a new paper, our very own Anthony Fowler has done just that. And what the data say about the efficacy of state imposed shelter in p…
 
The University of Chicago Podcast Network is excited to announce the launch of a new show, it’s called "Entitled" and it’s about human rights. Co-hosted by lawyers and UChicago Law School Professors, Claudia Flores and Tom Ginsburg, Entitled explores the stories around why rights matter and what’s the matter with rights.We’re taking a much needed b…
 
There’s a long standing debate in political science about the problem of strategic voting: when voters cast their ballots not in line with their true preferences, but for the candidate they hate the least whom they think is also most likely to win. In a new paper, University of Chicago political scientist Andrew Eggers shows that a completely diffe…
 
Theology professor, author, and African Methodist Episcopal elder Obery M. Hendricks Jr., Ph.D. joins Jaye on this episode of Potstirrer Podcast to discuss his historically rich and theologically informative book Christians Against Christianity: How Right-Wing Evangelicals Are Destroying Our Nation and Our Faith. This enriching conversation include…
 
This multi-episode series is about efforts to suppress or limit the vote in certain communities across the United States in order to achieve specific outcomes. In Part 2, Jaye discusses the history of voting rights in the United States based on sex from the founding until the immediate aftermath of the 19th Amendment, which prohibited the governmen…
 
You’ve probably seen a lot of surveys recently about how many Republicans believe the 2020 election was stolen, or that they support the January 6th insurrection on Capitol Hill, or that they don’t trust the vaccine. Do these responses predict their behavior in the real world? Or are they just partisan cheerleading? Northwestern Political Scientist…
 
Whether it’s trying to convince you to vote for a particular candidate or get vaccinated, the identity of the person who knocks on your door may matter. So who are the people who volunteer to do this canvassing? Are they likely to succeed? These are all questions that Harvard political scientist Ryan Enos investigates in his paper, “Party Activists…
 
In this public release of a bonus episode originally released on Patreon in December 2019, Jaye discusses the life of Dr. Timothy Leary, the "Godfather of LSD." How did someone so apolitical (in the height of an extremely political era!) make political enemies, and what made President Richard Nixon call him "the most dangerous man in America?" Twit…
 
Infrastructure. It’s one of the hottest topics in politics today. But what does the research say about the effects and politics of infrastructure investment? Political scientist, Jon Rogowski, from the University of Chicago has a surprising paper that shows the long-term economic outcomes of post office developments in the United States. But it als…
 
Activist, former pastor, and professor emeritus Drick Boyd, Ed.D. joins Jaye on this episode of Potstirrer Podcast to discuss his thought-provoking book Disrupting Whiteness: Talking With White People About Racism. This riveting conversation includes themes that are a part of Dr. Boyd's book, teaching and activism, such as understanding one's "race…
 
It seems like extremists politicians like Marjorie Taylor Greene receive a disproportionate amount of attention and money. This has led many political actors to believe that extremism is good politics. There’s even some scientific research to back up that claim. But a new paper by Professor of Politics at Princeton, Brandice Canes-Wrone, shows the …
 
CONTENT WARNING: The following episode includes brief discussion of physical violence and sexual assault. Listener discretion is advised. This multi-episode series is about efforts to suppress or limit the vote in certain communities across the United States in order to achieve specific outcomes. In Part 1, Jaye discusses the history of the vote in…
 
The debate about abolishing the filibuster isn’t going anywhere. Proponents say it forces compromise and consensus, while detractors claim it leads to gridlock and minority rule. But is there a third option? Harvard scholar, Kenneth Shepsle, has a radically different proposal that addresses all these concerns without abolishing the filibuster altog…
 
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