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The Short Term Rental Profits Show

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The Short Term Rental Profits Show

Air DNA, Homee, InvitedHome, Garrett Sutton, Vacation Rental Management Ass

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Navigate the rapid rise of short term real estate investment properties with the SHORT TERM RENTAL PROFITS podcast. Airbnb and VRBO have created new opportunities for savvy income property investors to increase cash flow and maximize ROI. Listen to SHORT TERM RENTAL PROFITS and learn how to identify the best markets to invest in as each city offers unique ratios of risk and profitability. Learn how property managers can simplify the experience for investors and how you can leverage dynamic p ...
 
KCRW’s DnA: Design and Architecture explores who and what matters in our designed world – on air, online and at public events. Host Frances Anderton talks to designers, users and experts about products, fashion, buildings and more, in Los Angeles and beyond –revealing how we shape today’s world and how it shapes us.
 
What will the future look like? The Future of Everything offers a kaleidoscope view of the nascent trends that will shape our world. In every episode, join our award-winning team on a new journey of discovery. We’ll take you beyond what’s already out there, and make you smarter about the scientific and technological breakthroughs on the horizon that could transform our lives for the better. Hosted by Janet Babin.
 
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Sports Yak

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Sports Yak

studioDNA | Corey Mann

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CHUCK FREEBY - Indiana’s 2017 Sportscaster of the Year, WHME Sports Director Chuck Freeby knows the complete Michiana sports scene as well as anyone…mainly because he’s been a part of it all his life. Born in South Bend, he is a 1982 graduate of Elkhart Central High School. In 1986, he received a B.A. in American Studies from the University of Notre Dame. These days, he is well known for his love of area high school sports. His passion showed for 17 years at WNDU-TV, where Chuck pioneered ex ...
 
Wanda Means is BLUNT. She will talk about anything and everything. Parenting. Divorce. Life. Dating in your 40’s. Different lifestyles. And, of course, Sex. She goes from a childhood of enduring sex abuse to having a fun and healthy sex life in the bedroom today. She is RAW. She is HONEST. She is UNFILTERED. She is on a mission to bring taboo subjects front and center. Open your mouth. She does and so do you. Don’t be afraid to use it. She isn’t.
 
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Science in Action this week comes from a vast gathering of earth scientists in Vienna, at the general assembly of the European Geosciences Union. Roland Pease hears the latest insights into the cataclysmic eruption of Hunga Tonga in the Pacific ocean from volcanologist Shane Cronin of the University of Auckland. He also talks to NASA's Michael Day …
 
Chi Onwurah tells Jim Al-Khalili why she wanted to become a telecoms engineer and why engineering is a caring profession. As a black, working class woman from a council estate in Newcastle, she was in a minority of one studying engineering at university in London and encountered terrible racism and sexism. She went on to build digital networks all …
 
Tree mortality in tropical moist forests in Australia has been increasing since the mid 1980s. The death rate of trees appears to have doubled over that time period. According to an international team of researchers, the primary cause is drier air in these forests, the consequence of human-induced climate change. According to ecologist David Bauman…
 
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .…
 
The pandemic has changed the way we work and where we work. Now, as companies try to coax their employees back to the office, they are encountering new demands and shifting expectations. In this episode, we bring you a conversation from WSJ’s CEO Council Summit between world-renowned designer Thomas Heatherwick, who has spearheaded huge office comp…
 
The heaviest thing in the Galaxy has now been imaged by the biggest telescope on Earth. This is Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our Galaxy – a gas and star-consuming object, a 4 million times the mass of the Sun. The Event Horizon Telescope is not one device but a consortium of radio telescopes ranging from the South Po…
 
The Mekong Delta is home to 17 million people and is Vietnam’s most productive agricultural region. An international group of scientists warn this week that almost all of the low lying delta will have sunk beneath the sea within 80 years without international action. Its disappearance is the result of both sea level rise and developments such as da…
 
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .…
 
Deadly heat has been building over the Indian sub-continent for weeks and this week reached crisis levels. India experienced its hottest March on record and temperatures over 40 degrees Celsius (and in some places approaching 50 degrees) are making it almost impossible for 1.4 billion people to work. It’s damaging crops and it’s just what climate s…
 
As a series of UN climate reports have warned recently, drastic reductions in greenhouse gas emissions – a halving over the next decade – are needed if we are to keep global warming down to manageable levels. No sign of that happening. An emergency measure to buy time that’s sometimes discussed is solar geoengineering – creating an atmospheric suns…
 
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .…
 
One person’s junk is another person’s treasure. Sometimes it’s even true in science. Nearly 20 years ago, researchers said they had completed a groundbreaking project, sequencing the human genome. But they were missing about 8%. Some researchers at the time called the missing pieces “junk.” Still, a team of about 100 researchers kept going and has …
 
Brain scanning experiments reveal how psilocybin works to relieve severe depression. Psilocybin is the psychedelic substance in 'magic mushrooms'. The psychoactive chemical is currently in clinical trials in the UK and US as a potential treatment for depression and other mental illnesses. Professor David Nutt of Imperial College London tells Roland…
 
Jason Hartman is joined by cost segregation specialists AJ and Randy Lyons, who’ve created DIY Cost Segregation to help you accelerate the depreciation on your residential rental properties and decrease your tax burden! Income property is the most tax favored asset class in America and the IRS has allowed people to depreciate a property over a 27.5…
 
Just over two months ago, the undersea volcano of Hunga Tonga erupted catastrophically, generating huge tsunamis and covering the islands of Tonga in ash. University of Auckland geologist Shane Cronin is now in Tonga, trying to piece together the sequence of violent events. Edinburgh University palaeontologist Ornella Bertrand tells us about her st…
 
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .…
 
“As We Work” is a new podcast from the Wall Street Journal about the changing workplace and what you need to know to navigate it. Every week, we’ll speak with experts, Journal reporters, and you about how our jobs intersect with everything else. In season one, we break down how our relationship to work has evolved in the wake of the pandemic and ot…
 
Russian forces in the forested exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear site may be receiving potentially dangerous levels of radiation. After the nuclear accident trees were felled and radioactive material was buried across the site. As the forest regrew its took up much of that radiation - making it the most radioactive forest in the world acc…
 
Ailie's first engineering challenge was working out how to get the solids to settle in a mixture of raw sewage at a treatment plant in Stuttgart. Years later, she worked on the Boston Big Dig and realised that large-scale construction projects were her thing. A seven lane highway was rerouted underground and a bridge built using blocks of expanded …
 
Ben Garrod is an obsessive bone collector and wild animal behaviourist. He was destined for a career in medicine but a chance encounter with primatologist Jane Goodall reignited his life long passion for conservation and led to him managing and researching the habituation of wild chimpanzees in Africa. It was a chance to record primate behaviour th…
 
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .…
 
It’s been more than a decade since the European Organization for Nuclear Research (known as CERN) discovered the Higgs Boson, using their gigantic particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider. After three years of upgrades, they’re turning the world’s largest machine back on. What secrets of the universe are they hoping to discover? Will there b…
 
Analysis of wastewater from sewage systems has provided an early warning system for the presence of Covid-19 in communities – showing up in the water samples before people test positive. It’s also possible to identify the variants and even specific genetic mutations. Davida Smyth of Texas A&M University has been using this technique in New York and…
 
Steve Brusatte analyses the pace of evolutionary change and tries to answer big questions. Why did the dinosaurs die out and the mammals survive? How did dinosaurs evolve into birds? If you met a Velociraptor today you’d probably mistake it for a large flightless bird, says Steve. His intense interest in T. rex, Triceratops and all the other dinosa…
 
Join Jason today as he welcomes Dr. Peter McCullough, MD. Dr. McCullough has over 50 peer-reviewed papers and is an extremely credible person in the medical field. You can also watch the video NOT on YouTube (having been censored) but on Jason’s other video sites: JasonHartman.com/Rumble JasonHartman.com/Bitchute JasonHartman.com/Odysee https://tra…
 
Hong Kong had been very successful at preventing the spread of Covid-19. Testing and isolation measures were very effective. However, vaccine uptake was low amongst elderly people and that says virologist Malik Peiris has now left them vulnerable to the highly infectious Omicron variant. The bombing of a scientific institute in the Ukrainian city o…
 
Jason Hartman discusses today's economic boom or bust and real estate trends with a very special guest and absolute wealth of knowledge, Dr. Vikram Mansharamani. He talks about identifying bubbles in various markets, and whether or not real estate should continue to be a profitable play over the long run. Dr. Mansharamani gives his outlook on other…
 
Sir Shankar Balasubramanian is responsible for a revolution in medicine. The method he invented for reading, at speed, the unique genetic code that makes each one of us who we are, is ten million times faster than the technology that was used in the human genome project at the turn of the century. What’s more, it can be done much more cheaply than …
 
Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks, Scientific American ’s senior health editors Tanya Lewis and Josh Fischman catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from vaccines to new variants and everything in between. You can listen to all past episodes here .…
 
Pay attention to the news not being reported! In the midst of all the chaos in Ukraine, Jason encourages you to take action against the FED using his patented Inflation Induced Debt Destruction! Also, save the date- April 1 and 2, 2022 for the Jason Hartman University virtual event! More details to come! And today, Jason welcomes geopolitical exper…
 
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