show episodes
 
30,000 Leagues explores the depths of some of the most vexing policy questions of our time. Hosted by David Yokum, cognitive neuroscientist and Director of The Policy Lab at Brown University, 30,000 Leagues features researchers and policymakers who use rigorous scientific methods in pursuit of a better understanding of what actually works in the world, leading to more effective policies and the future of evidence-based government. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
 
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show series
 
Year Up is a workforce development program that aims to bridge the opportunity divide and help young low-income adults who don't have a college degree find meaningful work. But how effective is it? Join us for a conversation with David Fein of Abt Associates about his newly-released five-year results from a major randomized controlled trial evaluat…
 
Governor Dan McKee became the 76th Governor of Rhode Island in unique circumstances, but he is no stranger to governing. In this episode, David Yokum sits down with Governor McKee to discuss how his experience as Mayor and Lt. Governor prepared him to lead, policy priorities for Rhode Island, and the role of science in government. Take a deep dive …
 
You're mindlessly scrolling through your phone, holding the entirety of the internet in your hand, but you're still bored out of your gourd. Why? And what can you do about it? In this episode, David Yokum sits down with John Eastwood, co-author of Out of My Skull: The Psychology of Boredom and Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology at York Univ…
 
It’s April 28th, 2020, and we’re a few months into the Covid-19 pandemic. Here in Rhode Island we’ve been under a stringent, stay-and-home order for the past 30 days. States across the country are starting to consider when and how to responsibly lift these restrictions. Yesterday, Governor Raimondo released a framework for how to reopen the state, …
 
On any given day, about half a million people are locked in jail, but not yet convicted of any crime. The most common reason by far is an inability to pay cash bail. Bail is the main driver of mass incarceration, but what is cash bail? How should it work in theory? And how does it work in practice? Are reforms needed? And if so, in what ways? Today…
 
We're in an unusual moment. Schools are closed. We're being asked to socially distance ourselves from our neighbors and in general. Society is bunkering down in the face of novel coronavirus. What is COVID-19 what can it do to our bodies and what are the risks? How should we respond both as individuals, families, and as a society? Should you be buy…
 
Humans have built hugely complex societies and technologies, but most of us don't even know how a pen or a toilet works! How have we achieved so much despite understanding so little? In this episode, David Yokum sits down with Steve Sloman, author of The Knowledge Illusion and Professor of Psychology at Brown University to discuss the extensive res…
 
Corporate America knows you better than ever before, but is that a good thing? The apps we use, the electronic books we read, and the digital coupons we shop with may be convenient, but they also provide businesses with an increasingly fine-grained map of our daily activities. Meanwhile, the new discipline of neuromarketing uses brain scans to prob…
 
Can money make you happy? How should you spend the 20 dollars in your pocket right now? Is mo’ money really mo’ problems? We are joined today by Mike Norton, a Professor of Harvard Business School and Co-author of Happy Money: The Science of Smarter Spending, which tries to answer these common questions. This conversation, though funny, will also l…
 
A few weeks ago there was a blackout in New York City and it caused all sorts of problems: traffic and subway gridlock, people trapped in elevators, no working appliances or computers. It is really a window into what our life would look like if there weren’t abundant electricity everywhere. So today we talk with Macky McCleary, former Administrator…
 
A conversation about the messy intersection of data governance, evidence building, and privacy in pursuit of leveraging our administrative data for the public good. With Amy O'Hara, Director of the Massive Data Institute at Georgetown University. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.…
 
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