show episodes
 
Radiolab is one of the most beloved podcasts and public radio shows in the world. The show is known for its deep-dive journalism and innovative sound design. Created in 2002 by host Jad Abumrad, the program began as an exploration of scientific inquiry. Over the years it has evolved to become a platform for long-form journalism and storytelling. Radiolab is co-hosted by Lulu Miller and Latif Nasser.
 
Every Friday, Amy Walter brings you the trends in politics long before the national media picks up on them. Known as one of the smartest and most trusted journalists in Washington, D.C., Amy Walter is respected by politicians and pundits on all sides of the aisle. You may know Amy her from her work with Cook Political Report and the PBS NewsHour where she looks beyond the breaking news headlines for a deeper understanding of how Washington works, who's pulling the levers of power, and how it ...
 
The Peabody Award-winning On the Media podcast is your guide to examining how the media sausage is made. Hosts Brooke Gladstone and Bob Garfield examine threats to free speech and government transparency, cast a skeptical eye on media coverage of the week’s big stories and unravel hidden political narratives in everything we read, watch and hear. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the ...
 
Every week, WNYC tells you about the best documentaries as they become available on screens of any size. Our hosts are Thom Powers and Raphaela Neihausen, co-founders of the Pure Nonfiction podcast and the DOC NYC festival, the largest non-fiction film festival in the U.S. WNYC Studios is the producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, Freakonomics Radio, 2 Dope Queens, Death, Sex & Money, On the Media and many more.
 
Death, Sex & Money is a podcast about the big questions and hard choices that are often left out of polite conversation. Host Anna Sale talks to celebrities you've heard of—and to regular people you haven't—about the Big Stuff: relationships, money, family, work and making it all count while we're here. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, The Experiment, The New Yorker Radio Hour and many others.
 
In this intensely divided moment, one of the few things everyone still seems to agree on is Dolly Parton—but why? That simple question leads to a deeply personal, historical, and musical rethinking of one of America’s great icons. Join us for a 9-episode journey into the Dollyverse. Hosted by Jad Abumrad. Produced and reported by Shima Oliaee. Dolly Parton’s America is a production from OSM Audio and WNYC Studios.
 
Aria Code is a podcast that pulls back the curtain on some of the most famous arias in opera history, with insight from the biggest voices of our time, including Roberto Alagna, Diana Damrau, Sondra Radvanovsky, and many others. Hosted by Grammy Award-winner and MacArthur “Genius” Fellow Rhiannon Giddens, Aria Code is produced in partnership with The Metropolitan Opera. Each episode dives into one aria — a feature for a single singer — and explores how and why these brief musical moments hav ...
 
Award-winning actor Alec Baldwin takes listeners into the lives of artists, policy makers and performers. Alec sidesteps the predictable by going inside the dressing rooms, apartments, and offices of people we want to understand better: Ira Glass, Lena Dunham, David Letterman, Barbara Streisand, Tom Yorke, Chris Rock and others. Hear what happens when an inveterate guest becomes a host.
 
He’s the President, yet we’re still trying to answer basic questions about how his business works: What deals are happening, who they’re happening with, and if the President and his family are keeping their promise to separate the Trump Organization from the Trump White House. “Trump, Inc.” is a joint reporting project from WNYC Studios and ProPublica that digs deep into these questions. We’ll be layout out what we know, what we don’t and how you can help us fill in the gaps. WNYC Studios is ...
 
Is your phone watching you? Can texting make you smarter? Are your kids real? Note to Self explores these and other essential quandaries facing anyone trying to preserve their humanity in the digital age. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts, including Radiolab, Death, Sex & Money, Snap Judgment, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many others. © WNYC Studios
 
It’s easy to forget that the United States started as an experiment: a government of the people, by the people, and for the people, with liberty and justice for all. That was the idea. On this weekly show, we check in on how that experiment is going. The Experiment: stories from an unfinished country. From The Atlantic and WNYC Studios. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts, including Radiolab, On the Media, and Death, Sex & Money. Since 1857, The Atlantic h ...
 
The United States of Anxiety is a show about the unfinished business of our history, and its grip on our future. Each week, host Kai Wright invites listeners to gather for intimate conversations and deeply reported stories about the choices we’ve made as a society -- and the new choices we can imagine now. We’re learning from our past, meeting our neighbors, and sharing the joy (and the work!) of living in a plural society. Our inbox is also open for your voice memos—send them to anxiety@wny ...
 
Join host Roger Bennett of Men in Blazers for this story of the U.S. men’s soccer team that swaggered onto the international stage and set out to win the 1998 World Cup in France. When they arrived, they faced only one serious opponent: themselves. WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts, including On the Media, Radiolab, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many others. © WNYC Studios
 
Tanis is a bi-weekly podcast from the Public Radio Alliance, and is hosted by Nic Silver. Tanis is a serialized docudrama about a fascinating and surprising mystery: the myth of Tanis. Tanis is an exploration of the nature of truth, conspiracy, and information. Tanis is what happens when the lines of science and fiction start to blur... Support TANIS to hear exclusive MINI and BONUS EPISODES and more! http://patreon.com/tanispodcast Please rate and review on iTunes if you enjoy TANIS! http:/ ...
 
WNYC Studios and Futuro Studios present “La Brega: Stories of the Puerto Rican Experience”: a seven-part podcast series that uses narrative storytelling and investigative journalism to reflect and reveal how la brega has defined so many aspects of life in Puerto Rico. Available in English and Spanish. Creado por un colectivo de periodistas, productores, músicos y artistas boricuas; presentado por Alana Casanova-Burgess.
 
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show series
 
Margaret Atwood reads her story from the April 26 & May 3, 2021, issue of the magazine. Atwood has published more than two dozen books of fiction, including the story collection “Stone Mattress,” and the novels “The Handmaid’s Tale” and “The Testaments,” which won the Booker Prize in 2019.By WNYC Studios and The New Yorker
 
Broadway and movies have both been deeply impacted during the pandemic. To get a sense of what lies ahead, Alec checks in with Robert Wankel, chairman and CEO of the Schubert Organization, and Pamela McClintock, senior film writer for the Hollywood Reporter. Broadway shuttered completely on March 12, 2020, and reopening remains a challenge due to s…
 
New York City officials have announced plans to boost many individual public school budgets, allowing those schools to avoid layoffs and invest in teachers, social workers, activities and support for students. At a press conference Monday morning, Mayor Bill de Blasio and Schools Chancellor Meisha Porter said the city will invest an additional $600…
 
Steven Mufson, business of climate change reporter at The Washington Post, talks about the role of EVs in meeting the U.S. climate goals, President Biden's proposed boost to the industry in his infrastructure plan, and the practicalities of shifting from gas-powered vehicles to electric ones. Plus, Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish and his newest…
 
The United States is in the midst of an epidemic of gun violence. This year alone there have been at least 152 mass shootings and more than 12,000 deaths from gun violence and it’s only April. The fact that public spaces, including grocery stores and workplaces, have become grounds for violence takes a toll on those attempting to go about everyday …
 
Another mass shooting, another workplace, another city, another uniquely American story. Gun violence has become pervasive in the U.S., and it takes both a physical and an emotional toll. At this point, you’d be hard pressed to find anyone who hasn’t been touched by it in some way, whether directly or just through the experience of collective traum…
 
In March, 13-year-old Adam Toledo was shot and killed by police in Chicago. Local community leaders and family members have spent the past several weeks demanding answers and accountability for what many residents are saying was an unjustified act. But the case is now gaining national attention after the Chicago Police Department released body came…
 
Every Tuesday evening through May 4th, The Greene Space and the non-profit advocacy organization Worth Rises are holding virtual panel discussions about the business side of the prison industry, asking: who profits when people get put away? We're previewing those discussions with a weekly segment here on The Brian Lehrer Show. Today: Private transp…
 
Emile Mosseri wrote the moving soundtrack to the family drama film Minari, (about a Korean-American family struggling to achieve the American dream in the 1980’s) and has been nominated for an Academy Award for it. (It's also up for best director, Lee Isaac Chung, and best film.) The pianist and songwriter also wrote the scores to The Last Black Ma…
 
“Surviving the Crackdown in Xinjiang” is a expansive and detailed account of Xi Jinping’s policies against ethnic Uyghurs and Kazhaks in China’s northwestern region, which culminated in the detainment of a group estimated to number more than a million, in the largest civilian internment since the Holocaust. The staff writer Raffi Khatchadourian tel…
 
In some ways, Biden is confounding the expectations of those to his ideological left. But recent blowback from many he considers allies on refugee issues led to a sudden policy reversal. On today's show, Philip Bump, national correspondent for The Washington Post, talks about the latest national political news, including the news that President Bid…
 
A retired NYPD detective says the force’s stubborn, insular culture was built to last. And Elie Mystal explains a 1989 Supreme Court ruling that made killing “reasonable.” Armed with the lessons from a 20-year-long career in law enforcement, retired NYPD Detective Marq Claxton talks about the police mindset and how a badge never shielded him from t…
 
Reaction to the recent police killing of a teenage boy in Chicago was immediately followed by local outrage, but newly released video that contradicts initial statements by law enforcement is now drawing national scrutiny. It also brings into focus the history of police violence against Latinos in the United States. From Chicago, we turn to the sub…
 
It’s widely expected that whoever wins the Democratic primary in June will be New York City’s next mayor. And for the first time ever, voters will choose a winner using a system known as ranked choice voting. WNYC’s Gwynne Hogan reports many voters don’t know what that even means.By WNYC Radio
 
The indie musician Michelle Zauner (who records under the name Japanese Breakfast) always had a complicated relationship with her mother, Chongmi. Michelle was born in Seoul and raised in Oregon, where she never felt like she was truly Korean or truly American. While it was sometimes hard for mother and daughter to understand each other, the thread…
 
An unknown number of New Yorkers receiving unemployment benefits may have to pay some of that money back to the state after they were overpaid a year ago. Sydney Pereira of Gothamist has more.The state's Department of Labor says a "small" number of people received double payments in April and May of 2020...back when the state's unemployment system …
 
Comedy clubs, sports arenas and music venues are starting to open back up. So how are they balancing the safety of their customers and the capacity they need to stay afloat? On today's show, Julie Kim, co-owner of Littlefield, a performance and arts space in Gowanus, Brooklyn, and Michael Dorf, founder and CEO of City Winery, and John Abbamondi, CE…
 
In 2017, Congress capped the amount of state and local taxes that could be deducted to $10,000. Before that, there was no limit. The provision has been an item of contention for elected officials in high tax states like New Jersey and New York ever since. New Jersey Congressman Josh Gottheimer has gathered a bipartisan group of 30 colleagues to cal…
 
Biden Administration Announces New Sanctions Against Russia The actions against Russia represent one of the first major tests for the new administration on the international level. Biden Administration Emphasizes Commitment to Israel at a Chaotic Moment in Israeli Politics A visit to Israel from U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin came as Prime Min…
 
Earlier this week, U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin traveled to Israel to meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Defense Minister Benny Gantz. The visit was a signal from the Biden administration that Israel remains an important international ally for the U.S., but it also came at a chaotic moment in Israeli politics. Prime M…
 
In a special episode on the crisis in Xinjiang region of China, the staff writer Raffi Khatchadourian investigates Xi Jinping’s government’s severe repression of Muslim minorities, principally Uyghurs and Kazhaks. Accounts from a camp survivor and a woman who fled detainment show how, even outside the camps, life in the province of Xinjiang became …
 
As The Takeaway looks at U.S. foreign policy under the Biden Administration, the show turns to look at Asia. This week, Japan’s Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga is visiting D.C., making him the first foreign head of state to meet with President Biden. Recently, territorial and political disputes between China and Japan have only escalated, and with th…
 
Conserving More Than Just the Planet’s ‘Beloved Beasts’ Historically, “conservation” simply meant not overhunting a game animal, preserving sufficient populations to continue to hunt the following year. Over time, however, conservationists have learned to broaden their focus from individual animals to entire ecosystems, protecting not just species,…
 
Understanding St. Vincent’s Volcanic Eruption Since April 9th, the Caribbean island of St. Vincent has been rocked by eruptions at the La Soufrière volcano. Over the last week, plumes of ash and gas have rained down on the island, and dense masses of debris, called pyroclastic flows, are destroying everything in their path. Tens of thousands of res…
 
Three of our favorite segments from the week, in case you missed them. The Chauvin Trial Continues (First) | Fighting Pandemics Through Global Cooperation (Starts at 29:15) | The Stories Our Clothes Tell (Starts at 57:45) If you don't subscribe to the Brian Lehrer Show on iTunes, you can do that here.…
 
This week, President Biden announced that all U.S. troops would be withdrawn from Afghanistan by September 11, bringing the country’s longest war to an end. Over the course of two decades, the war in Afghanistan has cost the U.S. trillions of dollars. More than 2,300 US military personnel have died, and more than 100,000 Afghan citizens have been i…
 
On Thursday, the Biden administration announced sweeping new sanctions against Russia over its alleged interference in the 2020 election, cyberattacks, and mounting aggression near the Ukraine border. The administration is also expelling 10 Russian diplomats from the U.S. The actions against Russia represent one of the first major tests for the new…
 
Some corporations are threatening to pull business out of states that make it harder to vote, and even working behind the scenes to soften efforts at what some call "voter suppression." On today's show, Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change, talks about how corporate America is reacting to legislation that generally restricts voting rights …
 
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