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Serial killers. Gangsters. Gunslingers. Victorian-era murderers. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. Each week, the Most Notorious podcast features true-life tales of crime, criminals, tragedies and disasters throughout history. This is an interview show spotlighting authors and historians who have studied their subjects for years. Their stories are offered with unique insight, detail, and historical accuracy.
 
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On the morning of July 16, 1936, the crumpled body of nineteen-year-old college student Helen Clevenger was found by her uncle in her room at Asheville, North Carolina’s Battery Park Hotel. She’d been shot in the chest and her face had been cut. A black bell hop named Martin Moore would ultimately confess after the murder weapon was found under his…
 
The Texas Rangers in the late 1880s were a tough and colorful lot, especially the members of Company F. And while they made their livings hunting down outlaws, none proved more cunning than Willis Conner and his sons, a fugitive family accused of murdering two neighbors in a business dispute over pigs. My guest is Joe Pappalardo, author of "Red Sky…
 
Between July 1st and 12th, 1916, a sensational series of shark attacks terrorized seaside resorts and communities along the Jersey Shore. Four people would ultimately die before the shark thought responsible was found and killed. My guest, Dr. Richard Fernicola, is the world's foremost expert on the subject. He not only tells the story of how the a…
 
In September of 1916 a mysterious fire consumed a cottage nestled on Ossipee Lake in New Hampshire, and when local law enforcement searched the wreckage they made a horrifying discovery. The smoldering body of Florence Small was pulled out of the basement, partially preserved by rainwater. The immediate suspect was her husband, Frederick Small, who…
 
In August of 1892, one of the most famous double murders in American history was committed in brutal fashion. Andrew and Abby Borden were hacked to death in their Fall River house, and their daughter Lizzie, home at the time, became the number one suspect. What followed was a spectacular trial, fought by brilliant attorneys, in a courtroom packed w…
 
Dr. Michael Conforti Following on from his talk: “Slaughter of the Innocents: an archetypal understanding of the tragedy of school shootings,” Dr. Michael Conforti, Jungian analyst, author and founder and director of the Assisi Institute, examines the escalation of child killings through his psychoanalytic lens. He explains why our approach to scho…
 
Dr. Michael Conforti Following on from his talk: “Slaughter of the Innocents: an archetypal understanding of the tragedy of school shootings,” Dr. Michael Conforti, Jungian analyst, author and founder and director of the Assisi Institute, examines the escalation of child killings through his psychoanalytic lens. He explains why our approach to scho…
 
Wyatt, Virgil and Morgan Earp and their wives united in Tombstone, Arizona in 1879 with the intent to make their fortunes, but along the way crossed paths with a gang of lawless cowboys that included Ike Clanton, Curly Bill Brocius and Johnny Ringo. In October of 1881, tensions between the Earps and their adversaries climaxed with a shootout in a T…
 
The tranquility of Ohio's Pleasant Valley was forever scarred in June of 1896 when tragedy struck the Rose family. Twenty-three-year-old Ceely Rose was infatuated with neighbor boy Guy Berry. When he did not reciprocate her feelings, her family ordered her to stop following him, and she in turn used rat poison to murder them. A trial would follow, …
 
In the summer of 1932, with the Cubs in the thick of the pennant race, Billy Jurges broke off his relationship with Violet Popovich to focus on baseball. The famously beautiful showgirl took it poorly, marching into his hotel room with a revolver in her purse. Both were wounded in the ensuing struggle, but Jurges refused to press charges. Even with…
 
In the early morning hours of October 17, 1953, a frightened, battered woman named Diane Wells told a horrific tale to police. She said intruders had broken into the top-floor penthouse apartment she shared with her husband Cecil, murdered him, beat her, and then made their escape. It was an especially sensational story because 31-year-old "blonde …
 
In 1835 Marcus and Narcissa Whitman arrived to the Pacific Northwest, building a mission on Cayuse land near the present day Washington/Oregon border with hopes of converting members of the Cayuse tribe to Christianity. However when a deadly measles outbreak devastated the area, it disproportionally killed Cayuse over whites, leading tribal leaders…
 
Americans are used to being on the lookout for a scam, but authorities are warning of a new kind of fraud. Puppy Kingpin shines a spotlight on Jolyn Noethe, a secretive businesswoman from Iowa who is accused of laundering puppies like drug money. Over the course of 7 episodes, investigative reporter and host Alex Schuman exposes the scheme and an u…
 
In February of 1896 the decapitated corpse of a young woman, who would later be identified as Pearl Bryan, was discovered in the woods of Northern Kentucky. Evidence would lead investigators to two dental students in Cincinnati, Ohio named Scott Jackson and Alonzo Walling. My guest is Robert Wilhelm, creator of Murder by Gaslight, an online compend…
 
In this third and final part of my interview with Dr. Edgar Epperly, the "little minister" Lyn George Jacklin Kelly is examined as a primary suspect in the 1912 Villisca Axe Murders. Although Kelly spoke obsessively about the case and even confessed to the murders, many believed that the confession was the result of mental illness and police coerci…
 
Frank Fernando (F.F.) Jones seemed to be one of the most obvious suspects in the aftermath of the horrific 1912 Villisca Axe murders. He had a contentious business rivalry with the patriarch of the slain Moore family, Josiah (Joe) Moore, intensified further because Moore was having an affair with his daughter-in-law. However there was no direct evi…
 
June 9th (or) 10th marks the 110th anniversary of one of the most notorious crimes in American history - the brutal axe murders of Josiah and Sarah Moore, their four children (Herman, Katherine, Boyd and Paul) and Ina and Lena Stillinger, two neighbor girls who had the terrible misfortune of sleeping over that night. It's a case steeped in mystery,…
 
The Ocean Monarch, captained by James Murdock, was a disciplined and safety-conscious passenger ship that should have smoothly sailed from England to the United States in 1848. Not long after its departure, however, a devastating fire broke out on board, turning the boat into a living hell on water. Close to two hundred people would die in the ensu…
 
Constance Mallinson, Los Angeles-based artist, writer and curator talks about the history of the Sublime in landscape painting and how climate change has influenced the way today’s artists represent landscape and nature, with examples from the exhibited in Mapping the Sublime: Reframing Landscape in the 21st Century at the Brand Library and Art Cen…
 
Constance Mallinson, Los Angeles-based artist, writer and curator talks about the history of the Sublime in landscape painting and how climate change has influenced the way today’s artists represent landscape and nature, with examples from the exhibited in Mapping the Sublime: Reframing Landscape in the 21st Century at the Brand Library and Art Cen…
 
On the afternoon of December 2nd, 1945, a fourteen-year-old student named Thora Chamberlain walked with friends to a high school football game in Campbell, California. A man wearing a U.S. Navy uniform pulled up beside them in his sedan and told them he needed a babysitter - and would compensate generously for the help. Thora accepted, got into his…
 
Marine scientist Christopher Gobler holds the Endowed Chair of Coastal Ecology and Conservation in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University explains the four “Horsemen of the Apocalypse” stressors affecting the waters and marine systems of Long Island’s bays as well as the Island’s human population. Then, Professor Go…
 
In October of 1905, the schooner Harry A. Berwind was intercepted off the coast of North Carolina. On board were four Black sailors, three of them alive and one dead. The survivors told conflicting stories - blaming each other for the murder of the ship's four White officers, who had been shot and thrown into the sea. The men would be arrested and …
 
Mary Ann Cotton is considered by many to be England's first female serial killer, with allegations that she used arsenic to poison over twenty people, including her children, mother and husbands in the 1850s, 60s and 70s. But was she really a heartless killer who preyed upon those in her care for money to buy the expensive dresses she loved so much…
 
Arnie Bernstein was one my first guests on Most Notorious, way back on episode #26, and talked about the horrifying 1927 Bath Consolidated School massacre. Since the initial publication of his book "Bath Massacre: America's First School Bombing" in 2009, he's conducted more first-hand survivor accounts, which he has included in the updated and expa…
 
Ramzy Baroud This month’s guest on Tidings is Palestinian-American author and journalist Ramzy Baroud who, in addition to his numerous books and writings, is author of the recently published Common Dreams article: “From Korea to Libya: On the Future of Ukraine and NATO’s Neverending Wars.” Today on Tidings, Baroud discusses the new world order he s…
 
Ramzy Baroud This month’s guest on Tidings is Palestinian-American author and journalist Ramzy Baroud who, in addition to his numerous books and writings, is author of the recently published Common Dreams article: “From Korea to Libya: On the Future of Ukraine and NATO’s Neverending Wars.” Today on Tidings, Baroud discusses the new world order he s…
 
Mildred Gillars, known to American GIs as "Axis Sally", was one of Nazi Germany's most notorious radio propagandists. Hired by German State Radio because of her American accent and seductive voice, she finally achieved her own version of stardom after years of pursuing a failed acting career in the United States. My guest is Richard Lucas, author o…
 
Amy Folk, Southold Town historian, talking about the North Fork Project and its goal of naming all the town’s enslaved people. In an interview expanded from the original broadcast during Black History Month, Folk describes the process of finding the enslaved as well as their enslavers, considers how Southold’s residents will respond to the project …
 
On Christmas Eve, 1900, 44-year-old dry goods store owner Frank Richardson was shot to death in his Savannah, Missouri home. Suspects included his wife Addie, his teenage lover Goldie Whitehead, and the man whom he suspected his wife of having an affair with, Stewart Fife. Kimberly Tilley makes her third visit to the podcast. Her book "Has it Come …
 
My conversation about the life of Eliot Ness continues with A. Brad Schwartz. After years battling The Outfit in Chicago, Ness was hired as Director of Public Safety in Cleveland, Ohio. Tasked with ridding the city of crime and corruption, he found himself confronted by a serial killer nicknamed "The Mad Butcher", aka "The Cleveland Torso Murderer,…
 
Throughout the 1920s Chicago was a cesspool of corruption and violence, due in large part to the obscene amounts of money being made through the illegal manufacture, transportation and sale of alcohol. Much of the business was being done by The Outfit, led by the charming and publicity hungry Al Capone, who viciously knocked off his competitors at …
 
In June of 1970, the body of 24-year-old Nancy Morgan was found inside a government-owned car in Madison County, North Carolina. It had been four days since anyone had heard from the bubbly, hard-working brunette who had moved to the Appalachian community less than a year prior as an organizer for Volunteers in Service to America. At the time of he…
 
A great interview with Tamara Winfrey Harris, author of “The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America” in which she exposes anti-black-woman propaganda and shows how real black women are pushing back against distorted cartoon versions of themselves. (First broadcast in 2017. Produced by Tony Ernst.)…
 
A great interview with Tamara Winfrey Harris, author of “The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America” in which she exposes anti-black-woman propaganda and shows how real black women are pushing back against distorted cartoon versions of themselves. (First broadcast in 2017. Produced by Tony Ernst.)…
 
On June 25th, 1973, Suzie Jaeger was abducted from her tent while camping with her family in Montana. The FBI was baffled by the mystery, until two agents began using new profiling techniques to narrow in on a local oddball named David Meirhofer. Assisting them was Suzie's brave mother, Marietta Jaeger, who over a series of phone calls with the kil…
 
Journalist Wayne Hoffman had been long intrigued by a family story, vague on details, about the murder of his great-grandmother Sarah Feinstein at the hands of a sniper in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Encouraged by his mother, he decided to search for the truth behind the tale, but his research journey became more difficult when his mother's health began to…
 
In October of 1946, a chiropractor and rancher named Willis "W.D." Broadhurst was beaten with a wrench and finished off with a shotgun on a lonely eastern Oregon road. Investigators would soon accuse his wife Gladys of plotting the doctor's murder with the help of his young cowhand and her lover, Alvin Williams. Stunning details of her deception wo…
 
Brewster Kahle, founder of the Internet Archive and the Wayback Machine, is this month’s guest on Tidings. Not only was he present at what he calls “the trailing edge of the hippies” of the Internet’s birth, but his participation continues deep within the ethos shaping the Creative Commons, Public Domain, open source technology and Wikipedia (Noam …
 
In this second half of my interview with Steve Oney, he shares details of the dramatic events that unfolded after the trial of Leo Frank for the murder of thirteen-year-old factory worker Mary Phagan. Steve Oney is author of "And the Dead Shall Rise: The Murder of Mary Phagan and the Lynching of Leo Frank". He has spent forty years researching and …
 
In 1913, thirteen-year-old Mary Phagan was found brutally murdered in the basement of the Atlanta pencil factory where she worked. The factory manager, a college-educated Jew named Leo Frank, was arrested, tried and convicted in a trial that seized national headlines. When the governor commuted his death sentence, Frank was kidnapped and lynched by…
 
As a special, I have selected four interviews from North Fork Works and Tidings, to honor and celebrate Black History Month: Amy Folk, Southold Town historian, one of the contributors on the North Fork Project’s goal to name all its enslaved people; author Mark Torres’ book documents North Fork’s migrant labor camps; Eleanor Morris Lingo, 95-year o…
 
North Fork environmental activists Mark Haubner and Margaret de Cruz, talk about zero waste, the circular economy and biomimicry, linking these concepts to the product stewardship paradigm, extended producer responsibility and the right to repair movement which gives consumers the right to repair their devices themselves. The discussion ends with t…
 
On the heels of Lizzie Borden's infamous double murder, another woman named Lizzie was arrested for a series of killings, this time in New York's Catskill Mountains. Lizzie Halliday was arrested in September of 1893 for not only her husband Paul's murder (found buried under the kitchen floorboards of their home) but also for the murder of two women…
 
Pennsylvania’s Eastern State Penitentiary has a rich and fascinating history. Built in the 1820s as a place to reform criminals, it saw an increase in violence over the decades before finally closing in 1971 as a working prison. It now operates as a history museum. Among the more notorious inmates was Willie Sutton, who was involved in the most fam…
 
Elizabeth Bigley - better known as Cassie Chadwick - might be the most successful confidence artist in American history that you've never heard of. She swindled her way across the eastern United States during the height of the Gilded Age, committing fraud at every opportunity. In her greatest con, she posed as the illegitimate daughter of robber ba…
 
Although we hear about climate change every day, we actually know more about its impact on the planet itself than we do about its effects on our mental health. In this Tidings from Hazel Kahan, climate psychology experts talk about what climate change is doing to our human psyches. (Rebroadcast on WPKN January 12, 2022)…
 
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